Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Doing Good

One of the last things Mike Puru did before he left The Edge, after 21 years on-air, was to visit Hope and her family in Whangārei to deliver some good news (The Edge Breakfast, 9 December 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

The full feature can be heard online here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

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Merry Christmas

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

’tis the season, we’re getting into the Christmas spirit with some audio excerpts from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Sound Collection.

 

Clip 1: White boots, a red coat with an ermine trim and a hat with a bell… one of Wellington’s early Father Christmases,  85 year old Mr Parks, talks about becoming a  department store Santa in 1905, when he was hired by the D.I.C. department store on Lambton Quay. (Ref. 148010)

 Clip 2: The sounds and smells of a South Island beech forest are beautifully evoked by novelist Dame Ngaio Marsh in this wonderful description of Christmas camping in the bush,  just before World War I. (Ref. 1474)

Glentui, Canterbury, looking down creek with trees on either side. The Press (Newspaper) :Negatives. Ref: 1/1-009860-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/29942387
The forest where Dame Ngaio Marsh camped. Glentui, Canterbury, looking down creek with trees on either side. The Press (Newspaper): Negatives. Ref: 1/1-009860-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/29942387

 

Clip 3. The Christmas carol “Tūpono Mai  - While Shepherds Watched,” sung in Māori and English by the children of Hiruhārama School, just outside Ruatōrea in 1939. Their school choir became quite famous from the 1930s onwards for the quality of their singing.  Prime Minister Peter Fraser visited the school when he was Minister of Education, and was so impressed he arranged for the children to go to Wellington to make some recordings and radio broadcasts, which he thought would be useful for other schools to hear.  (Ref. 30000)

Audio excerpts from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

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Rewind NZ

By Diane McAllen (Digital Programme Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Earlier this year we screened Rewind This (2013), an American documentary that celebrated the VHS format. The documentary featured an array of angles on the demise of this physical format: from enthusiasts who revel in the hunt for the rare and fantastic VHS limited editions, to the filmmakers and distributors at the height of the launch of VHS tape onto the domestic market.

On the opening night we invited Andrew Armitage, Louise McCrone, and David Summerfield to contribute to a panel discussion following the screening. We primarily wanted to know what impact VHS and its subsequent demise had had on New Zealand. We discovered on the night that we could have scheduled hours for the discussion. Here is a snapshot of the topics we covered:

Andrew Armitage opened the doors of the Aro Video Shop in 1989, with a collection of VHS tapes to cater for urbanite tastes beyond the mainstream. In this clip from the panel discussion he recounts what motivated him to go into the video rental trade, and the transition to DVD:

David Summerfield is an avid VHS enthusiast and collector. In this clip he talks about what drew him to VHS, the nostalgia, and a little about the VHS collector scene in New Zealand. Andrew adds that New Zealand was seen as a rental rather than a collector’s market, and mentions the impact of classification legislation on the distribution of cult videos in New Zealand: Continue reading

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NZBS Mobile Unit Collection: Tahakopa Sawmill

Audio Conservator Alex Porter is currently working on a project to digitise and describe the New Zealand Broadcasting Service Mobile Unit Collection. The project will take the best part of the next year, during this time Alex and her colleague Camilla will listen to every part of the collection. In this blog post Alex shares interesting snippets of audio she has come across this week, recorded by the Mobile Unit at the Tahakopa timber mill, in the Catlins.

The Tahakopa Sawmill was located 10km from the township of Tahakopa, in the isolated bush of the Catlins District, Otago. Situated right at the end of the Catlins River branch railway line, specifically built to manage the logging industry, the Tahakopa timber mill was one of many mills felling red and black pine, tōtara, and kāmahi trees from both state and privately owned forestlands.

In this recording from November 1948, an unidentified New Zealand Broadcasting Service announcer introduces the mill and interviews Mr Ab Griffin, Manager of the Harg and Company Sawmill, Tahakopa:

 

This clip features an NZBS commentary – with sound effects – of a tree being felled, recorded on the same occasion:

 

 - By Alex Porter (Audio Conservator, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

Learn more about the New Zealand Broadcasting Service Mobile Unit and Alex and Camilla’s work with this collection here.

 

Audio excerpts from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Cancelling Christmas

With Jay-Jay, Mike & Dom from the Edge Breakfast listening in, Nikolai cancels Nana’s Christmas (broadcast 9 December 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

The full feature can be heard online here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

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Audio Archiving in Australia

In November, Gareth Watkins, the Radio Collection Developer at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, visited a number of Australian archives and attended the Australasian Sound Recordings Association conference in Sydney. Some of the interesting learnings he brought back with him follow.

The conference’s theme was “Play It Forward – Sustainability in a Time of Rapid Change,” and it explored the many issues faced by audiovisual institutions in order to remain sustainable into the future.

Watch Gareth’s report back to staff on his travels:

Links of Interest

- By Gareth Watkins

 

Minor corrections to the above presentation:

  1. The buy-up of Studer tape parts was in 2004 (not in 2014 as mentioned)
  2. The NFSA “intern” describing collection items is actually a volunteer role
Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Music in Braille

In 1824 Louis Braille thought up a six-dot system to enable blind people to read and write. But, as  Lisette Wesseling explains, Braille is also being used nowadays to represent the language of music (RNZ Concert, 25 October 2015).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

The full feature can be heard online here.

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.

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Otago Museum’s “Hākui: Women of Kāi Tahu” Exhibition

By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

The lives of fifty Māori women of Te Waipounamu (the South Island) are the focus of a new exhibition at the Otago Museum, which is enriched by sound recordings from the radio collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

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Hākui: Women of Kāi Tahu was developed over two years by the museum in close partnership with whānau and papatipu rūnaka around the South Island. 

The exhibition opened on November 20 to coincide with the biennial Hui-ā-Iwi gathering that saw over 2,000 iwi members arrive in Dunedin for the weekend celebration of Kāi Tahutanga.

The term hākui is an acknowledgement of respect and a form of address to a female elder, and this exhibition celebrates mothers, aunties, grandmothers, taua, great aunts, great grandmothers, and tūpuna wāhine.

Fifty women are profiled in the exhibition, and their accomplishments shared through taoka*, photographs, memories and sound recordings. Interactive elements also feature, inviting visitors to step inside Aunty’s kitchen, hear the pronunciation of Māori words and placenames, and plenty more.

Curator
Migoto Eria (Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Kahungunu), Curator, Māori at the Otago Museum, listening to one of the archival sound recordings from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

Migoto Eria (Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Kahungunu), Curator, Māori at the Otago Museum, says the process of deciding which of the women to focus on was led by the iwi, with a steering committee representing local rūnaka set up in 2013.:

“The hākui featured in this exhibition have facilitated the growth and nourishment of their mokopuna; they have protected and shared their knowledge; and they have provided vital guidance and support to their iwi,” she says. “So it has been an honour to work closely with whānau and rūnaka on this important kaupapa.”

Last year Migoto contacted us at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s radio collection in Christchurch, to see what sound recordings we might hold relating to these wāhine. Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Dot’s Building a Castle

Dot Smith talks to Kathryn Ryan about the castle she is building with her husband, Neil, just north of Oamaru (“Nine to Noon,” Radio New Zealand National, 15 April 2014). The castle includes a secret passage, dungeon, drawbridge, moat and towers.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of this item please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

You can hear the full interview here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently during 2015.