Tag Archives: 1910s

LyttletonFeature

Bringing Lyttelton’s Past to Life

- By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Co-ordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Historic figures from Lyttelton’s past have been brought to life in a new exhibition of 23 compelling portraits, accompanied by archival sound recordings from the RNZ collection at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

 Artist Julia Holden used current Lyttelton residents as models for the portraits – first creating the costumes, hats, wigs and (on occasion) clay, for the hair, before painting directly over everything with house paint, then photographing the results. You can listen to Julia talking to RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan about the project here. 

 

The Nurse: Nona Hildyard (Laura MacKay) – on display at Lyttelton Health Centre
The Nurse: Nona Hildyard (Laura MacKay) – on display at Lyttelton Health Centre

 

The finished photo portraits are then hung in various locations around Lyttelton, which relate to either the subject or the sitter. The port town’s museum was destroyed in the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes and the project, which is called Lyttelton Redux, aims to help the museum maintain visibility in the community while it operates without a physical building or exhibition space.

A map and audio walking tour of all the portrait locations are available until the end of March 2017 via a free app.

By downloading the app you can listen to the sound recordings and view each of the portraits, making the exhibition accessible to everyone, even if you can’t make it to Lyttelton.

As well as archival audio relating to the historical figure (courtesy of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision) all of the modern-day sitters also contributed recordings, including members of Lyttelton’s well-known music community.

 

The Sheep Stealer: James McKenzie (Adam McGrath) – on display at Lyttelton Police Station
The Sheep Stealer: James McKenzie (Adam McGrath) – on display at Lyttelton Police Station

 

Excerpt from The Romance of Lyttelton (1953, ref. 159065) Continue reading

TaranakiPicnic

105 Years Ago: New Plymouth’s East End Annual Picnic

105 years ago today, New Plymouth’s East End Annual Picnic took place. The seaside games and festivities – including swimming, canoeing, a lolly scramble, greasy pole battles, sticky bun contests, and a tape chewing competition – were recorded by New Plymouth filmmakers Garnett H. Saunders and Brandon Haughton. The film was played to a full house at the local cinema one week later.


Scenes at the East End Annual Picnic, New Plymouth (Garnett H. Saunders and Brandon Haughton, 25 January, 1912)

British Mark I male tank near Thiepval, 25 September 1916. (Image: Wikimedia Commons, from the collection of Imperial War Museums)

The New Zealanders – and Tanks – Make Their Debut on The Somme

By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

September 15 marks the centenary of the New Zealand Division’s entry into fighting on the Somme in Northern France in 1916.   Commemorative services are being held in France on the 15th and on Sunday  the 18th at Pukeahu National War Memorial in Wellington. Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Wellington will also be hosting a screening of the 1916 film, The Battle of the Somme, on 15 September.

Lindsay Merritt Inglis. S P Andrew Ltd : Portrait negatives. Ref: 1/1-014100-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23020325
Lindsay Merritt Inglis. S P Andrew Ltd : Portrait negatives. Ref: 1/1-014100-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23020325

 15 September 1916 was the first real day in action on the Western Front for the New Zealand Division – and it was also the first day that tanks were ever used in battle. The two went into action together, as an interview from our Sound collection reveals. You can hear me talking about this recording with RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan here or read more below.

Lindsay Merritt Inglis, a solicitor from Timaru, was in command of a company of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade on the 15 September  1916. In 1964 he was interviewed about his experience and seeing those first tanks.

The British military command had been developing tank technology to try and break the stalemate of trench warfare. Their allied forces had been in the Somme area since July, with both sides quickly becoming bogged down in trench warfare and heavy artillery shelling was causing horrific losses. On the first day, they suffered over 57,470 casualties – the worst day in the history of the British Army. Continue reading

BattleOfTheSomme

The Battle of the Somme

This year marks the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. Imperial War Museums (IWM) and members of the First World War Centenary Partnership are working together to show the UNESCO listed film The Battle of the Somme (1916), to audiences across the world.

We will be commemorating 100 years since New Zealand joined the Battle of the Somme on 15 September 1916 at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Wellington, with a free screening of the film on Thursday 16 September 2016, at 7pm.  Find out more about Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s screening here.

The British High Commission, in partnership with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, Wellington City Council, Ticketek New Zealand, and RSA National will also be presenting special free screenings of the film with live musical accompaniment. At these screenings, on Saturday 24 September at 3pm and 7pm, at the Michael Fowler Centre, the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra will play a specially commissioned orchestral score by the British composer Laura Rossi. Find out more about the British High Commission screenings here.

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision will then offer additional opportunities to see the film at 7pm, Mon 29 Sept, Sat 1 Oct, Wed 5 Oct & Fri 7 Oct.

Read on for more information about the film, as well as the work that has gone into the restored version audiences here in New Zealand, and around the world, will be watching later this month.

Advert for "The Battle of The Somme" in "The Dominion," 18 October 1916, p.7. Image: Papers Past.
Advert for “The Battle of The Somme” in the “Dominion” (NZ), 18 October 1916, p.7. Image: Papers Past.

Continue reading

ERFeature

Physics and Passchendaele

By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Coordinator – Radio, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

This Tuesday was the 145th birthday of Lord Ernest Rutherford, who was born near Nelson in 1871. He is the man on our $100 note and “the father of nuclear physics” who was awarded the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 1908.

Ernest Rutherford aged 21 (image: Wikimedia Commons).
Ernest Rutherford aged 21 (image: Wikimedia Commons).

Last weekend also saw the re-opening of “Rutherford’s Den,” the cupboard-below-the-stairs where he carried out some of his earliest experiments at Canterbury University College in Christchurch. This is now a fully-fledged interactive science exhibit about the man and his discoveries and it features archival recordings from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s sound collection, including the voice of the man himself. You can hear me talking to RNZ’s Jim Mora about the recordings here or read more and find links to the recordings below.

ChristchurchArtCentre
The Clock Tower building at the Christchurch Arts Centre.

The Rutherford’s Den museum is in the Clock Tower building of the Christchurch Arts Centre, which has been undergoing a massive, multi-million dollar restoration after suffering earthquake damage.  Rutherford attended university there from 1890-94, gaining three degrees before winning a scholarship to study in England.   Continue reading

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Audio Curios: It’s in the Boot!

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Earlier this week I stumbled across a number of delightful game shows in the radio collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

The first programme featured the much-loved entertainer Selwyn Toogood. In this excerpt, he hosts “It’s in the Bag’” from Dannevirke in 1955.

 

“It’s in the Bag,” 1955, NZBS

You can hear a longer version of this show here.

 

Then I came across “One Minute Please,” a New Zealand Broadcasting Service panel game that was recorded in front of a live audience. Two teams of three, one male and one female were given topics to discuss for one minute, with general rules of impromptu speaking. Continue reading

CorporalWilliams

Audio Curios: The Horses Stayed Behind

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has started acquiring the arts programme Upbeat, which broadcasts every weekday on RNZ Concert. Upbeat covers a wide range of art topics, and – to my knowledge – is the only national daily radio arts programme in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

"The Horses Stayed Behind," courtesy of Cat Auburn, http://www.catauburn.com
“The Horses Stayed Behind,” courtesy of Cat Auburn

 

A recent interview saw host Eva Radich interview Sarah McClintock from the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui about the art work The Horses Stayed Behind. The work by artist Cat Auburn is a memorial to the thousands of horses that were transported from Aotearoa and died in Word War I. The artwork is made up of hundreds of rosettes created using horse hair sourced from across the country.

Sarah McClintock, Upbeat, 16 May 2016

 

Continue reading

SunnyNapier

Hawke’s Bay on Film 1913 – 1985

- By Jane Paul (Community Programme Coordinator, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision and Historic Places Hawke’s Bay showed a compilation of films focused on Hawke’s Bay history in MTG’s beautiful theatre in Napier.

MTG Theatre.
MTG Theatre.

People started arriving an hour early, and soon the foyer was crammed with people ranging in age from 2 months to 95 years!

Fifteen-year-old Bonnie Allen – who provided musical accompaniment for the silent films – set herself up at the grand piano, and people streamed into the cinema.

audience.
Audience members gathered for “Hawke’s Bay on Film.”

The programme began with a look at the fishing industry in 1913 –  a fascinating glimpse of life on the trawlers and the use of carrier pigeons to convey information about the catch back to the mainland. Sunny Napier – The Brighton of New Zealand (1929) kept the audience enthralled with scenes of old, pre-earthquake Napier.

Interestingly, Alec Douglas Lambourne’s film of the great earthquake in Hastings drew the most applause. Continue reading

Huia birds, male and female. Harris, Esme, fl 1980-1981 : Photographs. Ref: PA11-046-11. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23081750

Te Karanga a te Huia | The Call of the Huia

By Sarah Johnston (Client Services Co-ordinator, Radio – Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

If you have been to see Taika Waititi’s film The Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016) you will remember the scene in which the two main characters discover the long-believed-extinct huia bird, while they are deep in the bush.

In real life, the last authenticated sighting of a huia is generally believed to have been in 1907 in the Tararua Ranges, north of Wellington. Sound recording technology was in its infancy when the huia died out, so there are no recordings of the actual bird call itself. However, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s sound collection holds several recordings about the huia, including eyewitness descriptions of it – and a re-creation of the bird’s call by a man who remembered them well. You can hear me talking about these recordings with RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan here or listen to the full recordings below.
 

Huia birds, male and female. Harris, Esme, fl 1980-1981 : Photographs. Ref: PA11-046-11. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23081750
Huia birds, male and female. Harris, Esme, fl 1980-1981 : Photographs. Ref: PA11-046-11. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23081750

 

The sad tale of the huia holds a great deal of fascination for many people – both Māori and Pākehā, as well as people overseas. In my role as Client Services Co-ordinator, I handle requests from people who want to hear sound recordings from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s collection. In the case of the huia, these might be ornithologists, academics interested in aspects of extinction, or artists and musicians inspired by the melancholy idea of being able to hear the call of the bird that has long been silenced.

This usually leads them to one particular recording, which is the re-creation of the huia’s call.

 

Re-Creation of Huia Calls (Hēnare Hāmana, 2YA, 1949)

Continue reading

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: George Bissett’s Bugle

Producer Shelley Wilkinson visits the National Army Museum Te Mata Toa to learn about the shrapnel-torn bugle of twenty-year-old bugler George Bissett, killed on the 27 April 1915 – just two days after landing on Gallipoli (“Bugle Stories,” RNZ Concert, 24 April 2015).

Learn more about George here.

You can hear the full radio feature here.

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Audio from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz