Tag Archives: 1990s

Happy St Patrick’s Day!

To get in the spirit for Ireland’s national day you can listen to this “Spectrum” radio documentary from 1996, about Auckland’s St Patrick’s Festival.

 

Dancers at the Irish National Feis, Kilbirnie, Wellington - Photograph taken by John Nicholson. Dominion post (Newspaper) :Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1986/5281/18-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23030957
Dancers at the Irish National Feis, Kilbirnie, Wellington – photograph taken by John Nicholson. Dominion post: photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1986/5281/18-F. Alexander Turnbull Library http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23030957

 

Or tune in to Sarah Johnston talking to RNZ’s Jesse Mulligan about Irish recordings in our Sound Collection.  

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“How Bizarre” Turns 21

“How Bizarre,” the catchy hit by OMC (Otara Millionaires Club), was released 21 years ago today, on 15 December 1995.

“How Bizarre” reached the number one spot in New Zealand, Australia, Austria, Canada, Ireland, and South Africa, was on the US Billboard Mainstream Top 40 for 36 weeks, and won Single of the Year at the 1996 New Zealand Music Awards.

Master copies of the music video are preserved in the collections of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

Watch the music video and sing along:

Video courtesy of umusic NZ.

References

NZHistory, “OMC Release ‘How Bizarre’”

Young Hercules

By Zak Reddan (Ngā Taonga Cataloguer / Researcher)

Did you know Young Hercules, the title character in the 1998-99 TV series filmed in New Zealand, was played by a teenaged Ryan Gosling?

The US series was the second spin-off from Hercules: The Legendary Journeys (1995-9), following Xena: Warrior Princess (1995-2001).

In scripted banter with his The Nice Guys (2016) co-star Russell Crowe at the 4th Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards, Gosling referred to his time here: “I lived in New Zealand for, like, two years. I’m sweet as, bro.”

Young Canadian Ryan Gosling in Young Hercules. Image: (Image: Wikipedia).
Young Canadian Ryan Gosling in Young Hercules. Image: Wikipedia.

Pity he grows up to be Kevin Sorbo.

Some episodes of Young Hercules are available for viewing in our Wellington medialibrary (see Episode 44 – Home for The Holidays and Episode 46 – Herc’s Nemesis).

References

International Business Times, “Ryan Gosling Mistakes New Zealand For Australia In Hilarious AACTA Awards Skit with Russell Crowe,” 30 January 2015.

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US Presidents – The Kiwi Connection

With the results from the United States presidential election due to start coming in later today, we thought it a good time to take a look back at New Zealand’s previous Presidential encounters, as they have been captured in recordings held in the Sound Collection of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

American President Lyndon Baines Johnson shaking the hand of Clem Thorn, aged five years, while he sits on his father's shoulders amongst the crowd at Wellington Airport. Photographed by an Evening Post staff photographer on the 20th of October 1966. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23083703
American President Lyndon Baines Johnson shaking the hand of Clem Thorn, aged five years, while he sits on his father’s shoulders amongst the crowd at Wellington Airport. Dominion Post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP/1966/4545-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23083703

 

The first visit to our shores by an incumbent US leader was by Lyndon Johnson in 1966. He came to office after the assassination of John F. Kennedy in November 1963. That event shocked the world – and most New Zealanders who were alive at the time can probably still remember where they were when the news broke. Here is New Zealand’s Prime Minister at the time, Keith Holyoake, addressing the country on the tragedy:

 

New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation recording of Keith Holyoake (November 1963)

 

After the assassination of President Kennedy, Lyndon Baines Johnson was sworn in , and he paid New Zealand flying visit in 1966, primarily to shore up our support for the increasingly unpopular war in Vietnam.

It was a whirlwind 24 hour visit to Wellington, with a welcome at the airport, a motorcade through the capital and an official lunch at Parliament, while Mrs Johnson toured Wellington’s Botanic Gardens and Cable Car. Continue reading

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Remembering Terence Bayler

We remember Terence Bayler, who passed away in early August.

Terence starred in Broken Barrier (1952), in which he plays Tom, the Pākehā journalist, and was in a number of other Pacific Films productions in the 1950s before he headed off to Britain to pursue an acting career. He also had a role in Pictures, Pacific Films’ 1981 feature.

Broken Barrier (Pacific Films, 1952) film trailer

During the centenary of New Zealand Cinema in 1996 the Film Archive (as Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision was then known) worked with NZ Post to release a special set of film related stamps, and Broken Barrier was selected for the $1.50 stamp. The stamp is a wonderful photo of him and Kay Ngarimu (who plays Rawi). Terence came back to New Zealand and was present at the stamp launch. At that time Jonathan Dennis (the first director of the Film Archive) did an interview with Terence and John O’Shea (of Pacific Films), which was then used on his Film Show on Radio New Zealand.

Terence also acted in The Life of Brian (1979), Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001) and Brazil (1985)

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Audio Curios: Children Will Listen

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has recently acquired a set of Insight documentaries, spanning 1997-2000, deposited  by Adriann Smith, a former Radio New Zealand producer. Insight is now the longest-running documentary programme on RNZ, having started back in the late 1960s. Gavin McGinley, RNZ National scheduler, recalls:

“As I remember, the National programme used to have a documentary on Sunday mornings in the 1960s. Most of the time they were BBC programmes with the occasional one from the ABC, CBC or SABC. Then I think they began to alternate – one homegrown documentary, one overseas. The first time I remember Insight being used as a series title was about the time I moved to 2ZD Masterton in 1969. And for the next few years the programme was known as Insight ‘69, Insight ‘70, Insight ‘71, etc.”

Adriann’s documentaries from the late 1990s cover a diverse range of subject matter – from revamping the public service to body image.

One that caught my eye from 1997 was “Culture and Cool” – young people speak about cultural change and the influence of mass media on cultural ideas. In this edited excerpt, students from Rongotai College in Wellington talk about how music influences fashion and how media influences language.

 

Insight ’97, “Culture and Cool” (Radio New Zealand) Continue reading

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Audio Curios: “The Beauty of Difference”

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

9 July 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the passing of the Homosexual Law Reform Bill. The occasion offers an opportunity to dip into Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s radio collection and explore how the taonga can highlight changing societal attitudes –  in this case focusing on some of the perspectives of our Members of Parliament.

 

"Eyewitness News," 24 May 1985, TVNZ
“Eyewitness News,” 24 May 1985, TVNZ

 

One of the more striking changes in attitude has been from former MP John Banks. In the mid-1980s he was vehemently opposed to homosexual law reform. Here he is speaking in Parliament in 1986 about this “evil” Bill.

 

Committee of the Whole House, Parliament, 25 March 1986. Appears in the Radio New Zealand documentary 20 Years Out!,  original audio sourced from LAGANZ (ref: 0234-B)

 

However, 27 years later, in April 2013, John Banks backed same-sex marriage. Here he is speaking during the third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill. The Bill passed its third and final reading 77 / 44.

 

Third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill, Parliament, 17 April 2013

  Continue reading

An example of part of a National Sales Chart, 9 August 1987 (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

All the Hits and More

By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has recently acquired from RNZ popular music charts dating from 1956 – 1998. Sales and popularity data have long been used to create various music chart programmes, with the first “Hit Parade” broadcasting in 1946.

An advert in a shop window for the Lifebuoy Hit Parade, 1946 (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Documentation Collection).
An advert in a shop window for the Lifebuoy Hit Parade, 1946 (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

The “Lifebuoy Hit Parade” began broadcasting nationally in 1946 on ZB stations each week. Records were selected from the USA and UK music charts, plus recent music releases.

Listen to an unidentified announcer advertising Lifebuoy soap during the “Lifebuoy Hit Parade,” 1947:

 

“Lifebuoy Hit Parade,” 1947

 

Continue reading

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“We Must Rely on Dramatic Speech and Sounds Entirely”

By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision recently acquired a wonderful set of cast photographs from the RNZ drama department (#292798). Dating back to the 1990s, the publicity photographs document some of the country’s top actors performing in a wide variety of radio plays.

One such play – Danger, by Richard Hughes – was performed live on the radio and in front of a studio audience in November 1996, in the now demolished Studio 1 of Broadcasting House. The performance marked the 75th anniversary of radio broadcasting in New Zealand. Not only was all of the dialogue performed live, but so to were the musical moments and the sound effects.

(16/055/41) Foley expert Michael Wilson generating live sound effects of a flooding coal-mine “the old-fashioned way”. Producer Steve Danby notes: the small grey-topped stool was a crucial piece of gear in the drama studio: if you leaned on it, it squeaked, and it simulated everything from “creaking rigging on a ship” to “scary doors”. ‘Danger’ - November 1996 production, Radio New Zealand, Studio 1 - Broadcasting House, Wellington.
Foley artist Michael Wilson generating live sound effects of a flooding coal-mine “the old-fashioned way.” Producer Steve Danby notes: the small grey-topped stool was a crucial piece of gear in the drama studio – if you leaned on it, it squeaked, and it simulated everything from “creaking rigging on a ship” to “scary doors.” “Danger” – November 1996 production, Radio New Zealand, Studio 1 – Broadcasting House, Wellington (16/055/41).

The play itself has had a distinguished history. It was the first play ever written for radio, premiering on the BBC on 15 January 1924:

“To my mind, one of the best plays ever broadcast (and I do not say this because I had the pleasure of producing it) was Danger by Mr. Richard Hughes. Here was something that was written for wireless only; the scene was in a coal mine, and was meant to be heard and not seen. If this play had been produced in a legitimate theatre the stage would have been in total darkness; the players and the action would remain unseen.” – Nigel Playfair, Popular Wireless, 9 March 1929 Continue reading