Tag Archives: Audio Curios

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Audio Curios: “Beautifully Built with a Fine Fend and Elusive Side Step”

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision recently acquired an interview recorded in 1938/39 with All Black Trevor Berghan. The discs came from Trevor’s daughter Penelope Hansen and were recorded after the 1938 All Black tour of Australia.

 

The scene on the Queens Wharf last night when the Wanganella, with the All Black Rugby team to tour Australia on board, left for Sydney, (Evening Post, 08 July 1938). Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/18982283
The scene on the Queens Wharf last night when the Wanganella, with the All Black Rugby team to tour Australia on board, left for Sydney, (Evening Post, 08 July 1938). Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/18982283

 

Before the discs were deposited, I did some research and found that Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision already had some early recordings from that same tour in the collection – namely a short interview with the Australian and New Zealand Captains and the last 10-or-so minutes of the 2nd Test.

In this first audio excerpt All Black Captain Neville “Brushy” Mitchell and the Australian Captain Vay[ro] Wilson talk on the eve of the 2nd Test.

 

All Blacks vs Australia, 5 August 1938 (New Zealand Broadcasting Service)

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Audio Curios: Children Will Listen

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has recently acquired a set of Insight documentaries, spanning 1997-2000, deposited  by Adriann Smith, a former Radio New Zealand producer. Insight is now the longest-running documentary programme on RNZ, having started back in the late 1960s. Gavin McGinley, RNZ National scheduler, recalls:

“As I remember, the National programme used to have a documentary on Sunday mornings in the 1960s. Most of the time they were BBC programmes with the occasional one from the ABC, CBC or SABC. Then I think they began to alternate – one homegrown documentary, one overseas. The first time I remember Insight being used as a series title was about the time I moved to 2ZD Masterton in 1969. And for the next few years the programme was known as Insight ‘69, Insight ‘70, Insight ‘71, etc.”

Adriann’s documentaries from the late 1990s cover a diverse range of subject matter – from revamping the public service to body image.

One that caught my eye from 1997 was “Culture and Cool” – young people speak about cultural change and the influence of mass media on cultural ideas. In this edited excerpt, students from Rongotai College in Wellington talk about how music influences fashion and how media influences language.

 

Insight ’97, “Culture and Cool” (Radio New Zealand) Continue reading

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Audio Curios: Notes of Appreciation

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision acquired a set of very special discs from violinist Vince Aspey. The discs not only give a glimpse into Vince’s and his father Vincent Aspey’s distinguished musical careers, they also capture some of the early moments of the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra – back then known as the National Orchestra.

Six years before the National Orchestra’s formation in 1946, an orchestra had been established for the nation’s centennial celebrations. In this recording from 1940, the legendary British conductor Sir Thomas Beecham  – passing through Auckland on his way to Sydney – introduces and then conducts the Centennial Festival Orchestra and Heddle Nash and Isobel Baillie in the garden scene from Faust.

 

Sir Thomas Beecham (1940, National Broadcasting Service)

 

It wasn’t until after the war that a permanent national orchestra was established. Andersen Tyrer was appointed conductor and Vincent Aspey orchestra leader.  As noted on NZ History Aspey had never heard a major orchestra play, but his experience leading orchestras in Auckland, Sydney and Wellington made him an obvious choice for leader.

 

Vincent Aspey playing the violin, Wellington Town Hall [1955]. New Zealand Free Lance : Photographic prints and negatives. Ref: 1/2-146976-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22914998
Vincent Aspey playing the violin, Wellington Town Hall [1955]. New Zealand Free Lance : Photographic prints and negatives. Ref: 1/2-146976-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22914998
 

During those early orchestral rehearsals in 1946, Vincent Aspey’s son Vince recalls standing in the control room at the Waring Taylor Street studios watching his father perform. From one of those first rehearsals comes this recording of soloist Vincent Aspey and the National Orchestra.

 

Vincent Aspey and the National Orchestra in rehearsal (1946)

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Audio Curios: The Horses Stayed Behind

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

 

Recently Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision has started acquiring the arts programme Upbeat, which broadcasts every weekday on RNZ Concert. Upbeat covers a wide range of art topics, and – to my knowledge – is the only national daily radio arts programme in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

"The Horses Stayed Behind," courtesy of Cat Auburn, http://www.catauburn.com
“The Horses Stayed Behind,” courtesy of Cat Auburn

 

A recent interview saw host Eva Radich interview Sarah McClintock from the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui about the art work The Horses Stayed Behind. The work by artist Cat Auburn is a memorial to the thousands of horses that were transported from Aotearoa and died in Word War I. The artwork is made up of hundreds of rosettes created using horse hair sourced from across the country.

Sarah McClintock, Upbeat, 16 May 2016

 

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Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Naked – In Every Sense of The Word

Jack Tame talks to restaurateur Seb Lyall about what’s behind his new clothing optional restaurant in London. The restaurant has a waiting list of 28,000 patrons.

 

Newstalk ZB, 1 May 2016

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

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Audio Curios: “The Beauty of Difference”

- By Gareth Watkins (Radio Collection Developer, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision)

9 July 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the passing of the Homosexual Law Reform Bill. The occasion offers an opportunity to dip into Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s radio collection and explore how the taonga can highlight changing societal attitudes –  in this case focusing on some of the perspectives of our Members of Parliament.

 

"Eyewitness News," 24 May 1985, TVNZ
“Eyewitness News,” 24 May 1985, TVNZ

 

One of the more striking changes in attitude has been from former MP John Banks. In the mid-1980s he was vehemently opposed to homosexual law reform. Here he is speaking in Parliament in 1986 about this “evil” Bill.

 

Committee of the Whole House, Parliament, 25 March 1986. Appears in the Radio New Zealand documentary 20 Years Out!,  original audio sourced from LAGANZ (ref: 0234-B)

 

However, 27 years later, in April 2013, John Banks backed same-sex marriage. Here he is speaking during the third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill. The Bill passed its third and final reading 77 / 44.

 

Third reading of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill, Parliament, 17 April 2013

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Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Treasured Pacific Languages Flourish

Kia orana, Fakaalofa lahi atu, Malo e lelei, Talofa lava, Fakatalofa atu, Kam na mauri, Ni sa bula vinaka, Halo oloketa and Malo ni!

In May this year Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision started a pilot project to welcome in more Pasifika radio programming for the national radio collection. In collaboration with Pacific Media Network, we have started collecting the community language shows that broadcast on Radio 531pi.

Based in Auckland, the Pacific Media Network is partly funded via NZ On-Air and is accessible to an estimated 92 percent of the country’s Pacific population. The network targets both first-generation Pacific migrants and New Zealand-born people with Pacific heritage. In this recording from the Solomon Islands Community Programme, the presenters wish everyone a happy Mother’s Day.

 

 Radio 531pi, May 2016

 

In all, nine Pacific languages are represented with the:

  • Cook Islands Community Programme – Mondays from 6pm-6am
  • Niuean Community Programme – Tuesdays from 6pm-6am
  • Tongan Community Programme – Wednesdays from 6pm-6am
  • Samoan Community Programme – Thursdays from 6pm-6am
  • Tuvaluan Community Programme – Fridays from 6pm-10pm
  • Kiribati Community Programme – Fridays  from 10pm-12am
  • Fijian Community Programme – Saturdays from 7pm-11pm
  • Solomon Islands Community Programme – Sundays from 2-4pm
  • Tokelauan Community Programme – Sundays from 4pm – 8pm (and then the Samoan Community Programme)

 

- By Gareth Watkins

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

[Basil Clarke] in the New Zealand Players production of "Romanoff and Juliet." Negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1958/2046-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22702922

Audio Curios: The Man in The White Coat

You may have asked yourself, “who is that man in the white coat who sometimes appears at the top of our blog postings … and what is he doing?”

Well, thanks to Peter Downes’ research, we know that his name is Basil Clarke and he was part of the “listening watch” during World War II.

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).
Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

The photograph shows Basil in the main 2YA control room in Wellington, listening to shortwave broadcasts from the BBC, allied and enemy radio stations.  The control-room was staffed 24 hours a day, and when the operator heard a newsflash or something of importance they would do a direct recording onto an acetate disc.  This disc could then be re-broadcast to radio listeners in New Zealand (this was how news of what was happening in the war on the other side of the world reached New Zealanders, in the days before the internet, television, or even tape recording technology –which didn’t come in until the mid-1950s).

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s Sound Collection contains many of these wartime shortwave recordings – an example being from exactly 75 years ago, when news came through of Hitler’s proclamation that Germany would march against Soviet Russia:

New Zealand Broadcasting Service, 22 June 1941

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Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Future Indicative

Recently Ngā Taonga acquired from RNZ a set of two radio series that have, over the last four decades, explored the issues and experiences of disability in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Spanning from 1978 to 2015 Future Indicative and One in Five offer us a fascinating insight into the changing attitudes and perceptions of disability over the last 37 years. 

Even the programme’s tag line demonstrates changes in language and attitudes.  The tag line for Future Indicative in 1978 was “Future Indicative: the concerns of those with disabilities and handicaps”.  It was later changed to  “Future Indicative:  A forum for the sharing and understanding of the special interests and concerns of the disabled”.  And finally “Future Indicative: Of special interest to people with disabilities”.

In 2002, the programme was replaced with “One in Five: the Issues and experience of Disability”.

In this excerpt from June 1984, Helen McConnochie the show’s first producer, introduces an item on diagnosing brain injuries by telephone.

Future Indicative, 17/06/1984

In total, we have acquired approximately 386* Future Indicative episodes and 526 One in Five episodes – a rich legacy of public radio programming.

*The smaller number of Future Indicative episodes is in part due to the Radio New Zealand practise of re-using master tapes.  Because of the cost of purchasing and storing open-reel-tape, once a regular programme had been broadcast the tape was generally erased and re-used.  This practise continued up until the late 1990s when CD-R technology and digital storage was introduced.  The Future Indicative episodes that survive are mostly on standard audio cassette.  These were probably dubbed off the master as a copy for the producer.

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Audio from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz

 

Basil Clarke (Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision collection).

Audio Curios: Bring a Plate

Every Friday Regina Smedley, who is originally from Malawi, presents Voices of Africa on Plains FM.

In this excerpt she chats with Kalyani Wijayawardana about some of the early challenges of moving to Aotearoa New Zealand.

Voices of Africa, Plains FM, 01/04/2916

This broadcast also marked Regina’s second year on air.  To acknowledge this, her family broadcast these special messages:

Voices of Africa, Plains FM, 01/04/ 2016

 

This post is part of the Audio Curios series. Radio Collection Developer Gareth Watkins regularly comes across interesting, unique, and sometimes downright puzzling bits of audio during his accessioning work. He’s going to share some of these audio treasures with you in the Audio Curios series, which will be posted here on the Gauge blog frequently.

Audio from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision Radio Collection, all rights reserved. To enquire about re-use of these items please contact sound@ngataonga.org.nz