Radio New Zealand National. 2015-03-24. 05:00-23:59.

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A recording of Radio New Zealand National from 5am to midnight. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

24 March 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:05 From the World (RNZ); 2:05 The New Jazz Archive: Holiday Jazz- The Archive gets in the spirit with an hour of some of the best - and off-the-beaten-path - holiday jazz (F); 3:05 In the Land of the Dancing Kings, by Paul Horan (2 of 5, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:18 Pacific News 6:22 Rural News 6:27 and 8:45 Te Manu Korihi News 6:44 and 7:41 NZ Newspapers 6:47 Business News 7:42 and 8:34 Sports News 6:46 and 7:24 Traffic

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 24 March 2015
BODY:
One shot for glory, the Blackcaps gear up for South Africa, and our team is with them. Full coverage this morning, including a match preview and more on the all important weather forecast. Rowing rage, and why St Bedes is holding firm on its Maadi Cup stance and Vanuatu's massive clean up continues.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28'28"

06:06
Sports News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'06"

06:15
Pacific News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'28"

06:18
Parent shocked by call to close Redcliffs school
BODY:
A parent of two children at Redcliffs school in Christchurch says a proposal to shut the school is absurd.
Topics: education, politics
Regions:
Tags: Redcliffs school
Duration: 2'17"

06:20
Morning Rural News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'06"

06:27
Te Manu Korihi News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
The national rate of people being hospitalised for rheumatic fever has dropped further than officials thought it would; The Ministry of Education has backed down after it was taken to court over its intervention at a Māori immersion school; A South Taranaki tribe is visiting places in the South Island this week where their ancestors were sent to in the 1800s as punishment for rising up against the Crown for seizing their whenua.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'35"

06:40
World Cup washout would put Black Caps thru to final
BODY:
South Africa's cricketers will be hoping for a clear day in Auckland for this afternoon's World Cup semifinal against New Zealand.
Topics: weather, sport
Regions:
Tags: Cricket World Cup
Duration: 2'25"

06:44
Groser spy claim arguably most concerning yet
BODY:
A strategic studies specialist says if New Zealand spies did target the competitors of a government minister when he was bidding for a top trade job, then it's arguably the most concerning spying revelation yet.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: spying, GCSB
Duration: 3'31"

06:48
2degrees says it's now well placed to take on the competition
BODY:
The mobile phone provider, 2degrees, is gearing up to take on its two major competitors as it can now offer a full suite of telecommunication services to customers.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: 2degrees
Duration: 2'34"

06:51
Netflix launches its New Zealand service today
BODY:
Separately, the battle for eyeballs in the internet-based television market is heating up.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Netflix
Duration: 1'11"

06:52
Confidence between have and have-nots widens
BODY:
The gap in confidence between high income households and the less well-off has started widening again, despite rising income growth.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: confidence
Duration: 2'18"

06:54
NZD likely to track higher as economy continues to outperform
BODY:
Financial markets are betting there's a greater than 50-50 chance the New Zealand dollar will reach parity with its Australian counterpart within a year.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: NZ dollar
Duration: 57"

06:55
NZO lift's Cue stake to 41.5%
BODY:
New Zealand Oil and Gas's takeover bid for Cue Energy has proved more successful than initially forecast.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Oil and Gas
Duration: 28"

06:56
Promapp says business is growing and expanding
BODY:
A New Zealand software developer says his company is growing at a fantastic rate as businesses scramble to keep vital information useable and relevant in an increasingly mobile environment.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Promapp
Duration: 2'30"

06:58
Morning markets for 24 March 2015
BODY:
The Dow Jones Index is up 54 points to 18,182.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 53"

07:07
Sports News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

07:11
History beckons for Cricket World Cup semi-finalists
BODY:
Brendon McCullum and the Black Caps are just hours away from something no other New Zealand team has ever achieved -- a place in a World Cup Final.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: cricket
Duration: 2'59"

07:14
New Zealand and South African commentators on semifinal match
BODY:
And to discuss the match, Stephen Hewson joins us, along with the South African commentator, Neil Manthorp.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: cricket
Duration: 4'10"

07:19
High court overturns rowing suspension.
BODY:
A Christchurch school insists it was within its rights to ban two students from competing in the Maadi Cup rowing regatta, despite being overruled by a High Court judge.
Topics: education, sport
Regions:
Tags: Maadi Cup rowing regatta, St Bede's College
Duration: 5'12"

07:24
Vanuatu's northern islands running out of time in wait for aid
BODY:
The Vanuatu government is now in a race against time to distribute aid to the remote outer islands that were hardest hit by Cyclone Pam.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Vanuatu, Cyclone Pam
Duration: 3'59"

07:29
Andrew Little says he's been clear to Northland voters
BODY:
The Labour leader, Andrew Little, has delivered his clearest message yet, indicating there's just one candidate to vote for in this weekend's by-election if Nortlanders want change in their region.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: by-election
Duration: 4'20"

07:36
Trade Minister talks up FTA benefits to Northland
BODY:
Talking up the merits of a trade deal has been taken to new heights by the Trade Minister, who says the Korean Free Trade Agreement could provide enormous benefit to the people of Northland, who go to the polls for a by-election on Saturday.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Korea, Korean Free Trade Agreement
Duration: 3'15"

07:40
Iwi still in the mix for state house sell off
BODY:
Iwi say they're still interested in becoming big players in the state housing market.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: social housing, iwi, Sonny Tau
Duration: 3'55"

07:47
Kiwi hits record high against OZ and Euro
BODY:
The Kiwi has hit a record high against the Australian dollar and the euro overnight.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: NZ dollar
Duration: 2'26"

07:49
Tea break law will be used widely warns union
BODY:
A retail workers' union claims Australian company Cotton On is wasting no time in implementing the "tea break'' employment law change for its New Zealand warehouse staff.
Topics: business, law
Regions:
Tags: Cotton On, tea breaks
Duration: 6'11"

07:55
Netflix launches New Zealand-based service today
BODY:
Netflix has today launched its New Zealand-based service, adding to its almost 50 million subscribers worldwide.
Topics: technology, internet
Regions:
Tags: Netflix
Duration: 3'04"

08:07
Sports News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'12"

08:11
Tens of thousands expected for Cricket World Cup semi-final
BODY:
Tens of thousands of cricket-mad fans will pack Auckland's Eden Park today for what's sure to be a hotly-contested semi-final of the Cricket World Cup between the Black Caps and South Africa.
Topics: sport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Cricket World Cup
Duration: 3'26"

08:14
Proteas get ready to meet Black Caps in CWC semi final
BODY:
And listening to that is South Africa's Deputy Minister of Sport and recreation, Gert Oosthuizen who is in Auckland for the match.
Topics: sport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Cricket World Cup
Duration: 4'35"

08:19
Principals Federation supports St Bedes stance
BODY:
A Christchurch school says it's receiving widespread support for its stance on banning two students from the Maadi Cup rowing regatta, despite being overruled by a High Court judge.
Topics: education, law, sport
Regions:
Tags: Maadi Cup rowing regatta, St Bede's College
Duration: 5'42"

08:25
Drunk ship's captain is fined in Tauranga
BODY:
A ship's captain has been fined three-thousand dollars for being drunk in charge of a bulk carrier.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: ship's captain, alcohol
Duration: 3'59"

08:29
Markets Update for 24 March 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'01"

08:37
Minister says school closure not cost cutting
BODY:
The Minister of Education, Hekia Parata, is insisting a proposal to close Christchurch's Redcliffs Primary School is not a cost cutting measure.
Topics: education
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Redcliffs Primary School
Duration: 3'21"

08:39
Mark Lundy told detective petrol stolen from his vehicle
BODY:
A jury's been told that Mark Lundy told a detective petrol was often stolen from his vehicle when staying at motels during business trips.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Mark Lundy
Duration: 3'30"

08:42
Kaikoura landowner says time to put a stop to shooting
BODY:
A Kaikoura land-owner is calling for an outright ban on shooting on public roads to put an end to illegal hunting once and for all.
EXTENDED BODY:
A Kaikoura land-owner is calling for an outright ban on shooting on public roads, which she says would put an end to illegal hunting once and for all.

Photo: RNZ / Patrick Phelps

Shooting a firearm on a public road - as long as it is not endangering lives - is actually legal, but farmers in the Puhi Puhi and Blue Duck Valleys north of Kaikoura do not think it should be.
And they think a ban would crack down on poaching, which they say only gets worse in the coming weeks going into the roar (the deer breeding season) after first frost at the end of March and start of April.
Reporter Patrick Phelps spoke to local land-owners.
The Puhi Puhi Valley, just north of Kaikoura, is an isolated farming valley.
Sheep, cattle and deer are common in the area - and so are poachers.
Driving up the windy road, it is easy to pick at least four or five signs, warning that it is private land, and shooting is forbidden, though poachers do not seem to be getting the message.
"I think we are, in the Puhi Valley, an accident waiting to happen" Nicky McArthur, who runs owns a tourism lodge on Te Puhi Peaks station at the head of the valley, said.
She said there needed to be a total ban on shooting from public roads, an area of the law that has too many grey areas.
"Purely from a safety point of view, where ever you are in New Zealand, I believe we've got issues.
"We've got lots more mountain bikers around these days, and I think we need to be really concerned about shooting on public roads that are surrounded by private land, because who knows what farming activity might be going on behind the next bush, or hedge, or what residents might be there?"
"Two stags we had behind wire were gutshot and left to die, and we, obviously hadn't realised that they'd been gutshot at night from the public road at the gate."

Kevin and Sandy Topp with pet fawn, who was left for dead in the wild after her mother was shot by a poacher.
Photo: RNZ / Patrick Phelps

Her neighbour Kevin Topp agreed that an outright ban on shooting on public roads would give the police confidence that if they took a case to court a prosecution would be guaranteed.
"All our houses up the road, are near the road, and anybody shooting on the road, can easily miss the deer, or the bullet goes right through the deer, and our houses are so handy to the road, we could quite easily get shot. In fact, I can show you a bullet hole in the window."
"The most worrying one was when a poacher came in and threatened to shoot my wife."

A bullet hole in Kevin Topp's window
Photo: RNZ / Patrick Phelps

In the neighbouring Blue Duck valley farmer Dave Pickering wants poaching knocked on the head, but said a ban on shooting on public roads was a serious step to take.
"There's merit in banning shooting from the road, but it's a big move", he said.
"The land owner, that owns the property, that the road goes through, would then be breaking the law, shooting onto his own property.
"This is a whole can of worms, it takes.....well, I'm not sure what the complete answer is."
"If somebody's gonna get shot by a wayward bullet the chances are it'll be one of us."

Dave Pickering
Photo: RNZ / Patrick Phelps

Department of Conservation ranger Mike Morrissey said it was already illegal to have a loaded firearm in a vehicle, but there needed to be more clarity on roads and firearms full stop.
"People shouldn't be able to just shoot, from a public road, unless for a lawful purpose. I think that's the sort of wording that needs to be there.
"Under the Arms Act, it's illegal for anyone travelling along the road to have a loaded fire arm. But if you weren't allowed to do it at all, accept for a lawful purpose, it might make a lot of people think."
There were areas of the law which depend on interpretation the officer in charge at the Kaikoura Police Station Matt Boyce said.
"Some of it may appear, ambiguous, about shooting off a public road.
"Because we do want to know, especially in the evening, and the night time, it's going to be dangerous when you don't know where the bullet's going, you don't know what's behind that bush."
Farmers said it was high time the law was looked at, before it was too late.
Related

Concern at rise in illegal hunting
Pair charged over deer poaching

Topics: law
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: ban on shooting on public roads, shooting ban
Duration: 3'29"

08:48
Te Manu Korihi News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
Parents who removed their children from a Māori immersion state school say they've been betrayed by the Ministry of Education; The national rate of people being hospitalised for rheumatic fever has dropped further than officials thought it would; A South Taranaki tribe is visiting places in the South Island this week where their ancestors were sent to in the 1800s as punishment for rising up against the Crown for seizing their whenua.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'24"

08:51
Porirua vows to put children first
BODY:
The Porirua Council today unveils its Children's Priority -- a policy Mayor Nick Leggett says will put children and young people at the heart of decision making.
Topics: politics
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Porirua Council, Children's Priority
Duration: 3'34"

08:55
Guptill's cricket club prepares to watch local hero
BODY:
The cricket world cup semifinal is just over five hours away.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Cricket World Cup
Duration: 4'00"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The Dwarf Who Moved, by Peter Williams QC (1 of 8, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Secondary Principals disquiet over St Bede's case
BODY:
St Bede's College in Christchurch told two boys they couldn't compete in the Maadi Cup rowing regatta after they breached aviation security and rode on the baggage carrier at Auckland airport. But the boys' parents took the matter to the High Court, which granted an interim injunction which allowed the boys to compete yesterday. Tom Parsons is the President of the Secondary School Principals' Association, and Jol Bates, Hawkes Bay lawyer who represented the St John's College schoolboy Lucan Battison, who refused to cut his hair.
Topics: education, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'31"

09:20
Did St Bede's College treat rowers fairly?
BODY:
St Bede's College in Christchurch told two boys they couldn't compete in the Maadi Cup rowing regatta after they breached aviation security and rode on the baggage carrier at Auckland airport. But the boys' parents took the matter to the High Court, which granted an interim injunction which allowed the boys to compete yesterday.
Topics: law, education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'42"

09:28
Is the BBC punishing Savile whistleblowers?
BODY:
The award winning journalist whose documentary exposing Jimmy Savile as a serial sex abuser was pulled by the BBC, says he and others behind the revelations have been systematically driven out by the broadcaster.
EXTENDED BODY:
An award-winning journalist whose documentary exposing Jimmy Savile as a serial sex abuser was pulled by the BBC, says he and others behind the revelations have been systematically driven out by the broadcaster.
Meirion Jones says there remains a very powerful group of people at the BBC who believe the truth about Jimmy Savile should never have come out.
After Savile died in October 2011, Meirion Jones, then a BBC Newsnight producer, and his colleague Liz MacKean made a documentary that identified Savile as a serial abuser who used his status as a television personality to get access to young girls.
Their expose was scheduled for broadcast in December 2011, but the BBC pulled it, instead running tributes to Savile as part of its Christmas broadcasts.
The allegations about Savile only came to light 10 months later, after ITV broadcast its own investigation which resulted in a major police investigation.
Four weeks after that the BBC's own prestigious news programme, Panorama revealed just how much the BBC knew, including why it pulled the Newsnight documentary and suggested key figures at the BBC had known for years about Jimmy Savile's behaviour.
Meirion Jones and Liz MacKean were both interviewed for the Panorama programme. Meirion Jones says they were warned by BBC managers that if they cooperated with Panorama they would never work for the BBC again. Both have since lost their jobs with the public broadcaster. The editor of Panorama has also lost his job.
There's just a small group but unfortunately very powerful people at the BBC who believe that the problem was that the story came out. If Savile had stayed concealed, hidden for the rest of time, that would have been the ideal solution.

Meirion Jones says a senior BBC executive went as far as describing himself and Liz MacKean as traitors to the BBC.
He says the broadcaster's attitude is an example of institutional failings that have been identified across other areas of British society, including the media and the police. He says there were people in the BBC who were told that Jimmy Savile was a paedophile but they did nothing.
I think the key lesson that has been given by this is 'don't be a whistleblower'. If you blow the whistle your career will be wrecked. And that is a very dangerous message for an institution like the BBC to give. If only any of the people in Radio 1 or top of the Pops who had known what Savile was doing had come forward.

Meirion Jones spoke to Kathryn Ryan on Nine to Noon.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'11"

09:40
Gavin Larsen on World Cup Cricket Semi Final
BODY:
Gavin Larsen is a former NZ international cricket player and he is the Cricket Operations Manager NZ for the Cricket World Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Cricket World Cup
Duration: 7'36"

09:48
US Correspondent Susan Milligan
BODY:
Susan Milligan reports from the US on Israeli-US relations, following Benjamin Netanyahu's provocative visit to the States just before his re-election, and Texas Senator Ted Cruz's entry into the presidential race.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA
Duration: 10'01"

10:10
Te Papa's new Chief Executive, Rick Ellis
BODY:
Te Papa's new boss, Rick Ellis speaks about his vision for what our national musuem should be, and the challenge of trying to be all things to all people. Rick Ellis is Te Papa's fourth CEO. His appointment followed the departure of Mike Houlihan, who oversaw a controversial restructuring of the museum and left amid claims of the museum was facing a 12 million dollar deficit. Rick Ellis was the chief executive of TVNZ from mid 2006 until the end of 2011. He then moved to Sydney to be the Group Executive of Telstra Media.
Topics: arts, history
Regions:
Tags: Te Papa, museum
Duration: 32'12"

10:42
Book Review: 'Too Close to Home' by Susan Lewis
BODY:
Published by Penguin Random House. Reviewed by Harry Broad.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'44"

11:11
Business commentator, Rod Oram
BODY:
Business commentator Rod Oram discusses the latest GDP figures; social housing after the Salvation Army bows out; and business strategies of international media companies.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'35"

11:26
Why toys for girls are holding them back
BODY:
A young engineer is using toys to encourage girls to pursue careers in science and technology
EXTENDED BODY:
When Alice Brooks was a child she desperately wanted a Barbie doll. She begged her father to buy her one, but he gave her a saw instead. So she made a doll from wood.
It sparked a passion to design and build, leading her to MIT and then Stanford University where she did a masters in engineering. She was one of just a few women on the course.
Brooks realised that, unlike many girls, she had grown up playing with building toys, which had inspired her to pursue a career in engineering.
She said most toys targeted at girls, like dolls and dollhouses, don't encourage the development of spatial skills, mathematics and confidence with technology.
"I was seeing my friend's from growing up weren't even considering engineering as a possibility, whereas I thought it was the logical next step because I already loved building things. That's when I realised I'd had an unusual childhood."
Brooks said in the United States fewer than 15% of women entered university intending to major in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.
She believed it was because many girls don't have exposure to building toys as children.
"We aren't giving enough options to girls early on, when they're just exploring and having fun and trying things out. So when they're 5, 6 years old, if their options are already limited then, of course, they're going to be limited years later when they enter college."
She and fellow Stanford student Bettina Chen want to change that. They set up the toy company Roominate, which makes toys targeted at pre-teen girls, allowing them to design, build and wire their own dollhouses.
"Our mission is to really expand their possibilities, get girls exposed to things like building and putting together circuits and problem solving. With the hopes that a few of them will find that that's something they're really interested in and choose to pursue that later on."
Brooks said they chose to focus on dolls houses as they wanted to bring the spatial and electronic experience into a context that would attract girls.
Alice Brooks spoke to Kathryn Ryan on Nine to Noon about Roominate.

Topics:
Regions:
Tags: toys
Duration: 12'09"

11:42
Media commentator Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Media commentator Gavin Ellis discusses Fairfax proposed changes that will see regional newspaper editorships disestablished in favour of regional editors responsible for all media.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'52"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Secondary Principals disquiet over St Bede's case
St Bede's College in Christchurch told two boys they couldn't compete in the Maadi Cup rowing regatta after they breached aviation security and rode on the baggage carrier at Auckland airport. But the boys' parents took the matter to the High Court, which granted an interim injunction which allowed the boys to compete yesterday.
Tom Parsons is the President of the Secondary School Principals' Association, and Jol Bates, Hawkes Bay lawyer who represented the St John's College schoolboy Lucan Battison, who refused to cut his hair.
09:20 Did St Bede's College treat rowers fairly?
St Bede's College in Christchurch told two boys they couldn't compete in the Maadi Cup rowing regatta after they breached aviation security and rode on the baggage carrier at Auckland airport. But the boys' parents took the matter to the High Court, which granted an interim injunction which allowed the boys to compete yesterday.
Jol Bates, Hawkes Bay lawyer who represented the St John's College schoolboy Lucan Battison, who refused to cut his hair.
09:30 Meirion Jones: the journalist who broke the Jimmy Savile Story on his treatment by the BBC
Has the BBC deliberately got rid of the journalists who revealed the truth about Jimmy Savile?
After Savile died in October 2011, Meirion Jones and his Newsnight colleague Liz MacKean made a documentary that exposed Savile as a serial abuser who used his status as a television personality to get access to young girls. But the BBC pulled it before its scheduled broadcast in December 2011, instead running glowing tributes to Savile as part of its Christmas broadcasts.
The truth about Savile came out many months later, and BBC's Panorama programme then made the documentary: Jimmy Savile: What the BBC Knew. Since than many BBC staff involved in those stories have lost their jobs with the public broadcaster.
09:35 Gavin Larsen on World Cup Cricket Semi Final
Gavin Larsen is a former NZ international cricket player and he is the Cricket Operations Manager NZ for the Cricket World Cup.
09:45 US Correspondent Susan Milligan
Susan Milligan reports from the US on Israeli-US relations, following Benjamin Netanyahu's provocative visit to the States just before his re-election, and Texas Senator Ted Cruz's entry into the presidential race.
10:05 Te Papa's new Chief Executive, Rick Ellis
Te Papa's new boss, Rick Ellis speaks about his vision for what our national musuem should be, and the challenge of trying to be all things to all people.
Rick Ellis is Te Papa's fourth CEO. His appointment followed the departure of Mike Houlihan, who oversaw a controversial restructuring of the museum and left amid claims of the museum was facing a 12 million dollar deficit. Rick Ellis was the chief executive of TVNZ from mid 2006 until the end of 2011. He then moved to Sydney to be the Group Executive of Telstra Media.
10:30 Book Review: 'Too Close to Home' by Susan Lewis
Published by Penguin Random House. Reviewed by Harry Broad
10:45 The Reading: The Dwarf Who Moved' by Peter Williams QC (Part 1 of 8)
Observations and anecdotes from the life of New Zealand's pre-eminent criminal defence lawyer.
11:05 Business commentator, Rod Oram
Business commentator Rod Oram discusses the latest GDP figures; social housing after the Salvation Army bows out; and business strategies of international media companies.
11:30 Why girls toys are holding them back
Two young engineers are using toys to encourage girls to pursue careers in science and technology. Alice Brooks and Bettina Chen met while doing their masters in engineering at Stanford University.
They realised that most toys targeted at girls do not encourage the development of spatial skills, hands-on problem solving skills, and confidence with technology. So they set up the toy company Roominate, which makes interlocking building toys targeted at girls aged 6-10, which allows them to design, build and wire their own dolls houses.
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Media commentator Gavin Ellis discusses Fairfax proposed changes that will see regional newspaper editorships disestablished in favour of regional editors responsible for all media.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Dion Warwick
Song: Walk On By
Composer: Bacharach
Album: n/a
Label: EMI 701398
Time: 11:08
Artist: City Oh Sigh
Song: Sometimes
Composer: City Oh Sigh
Album: Fragments Fine
Label: Home Alone 856874
Time: 11:21

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
The covers are off at Eden Park as the Black Caps look to make Cricket World Cup history. Les Munro's war medals will remain in New Zealand.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'37"

12:17
Kathmandu makes $1.8m first-half loss, 2nd half sales down
BODY:
Kathmandu Holdings has reported a half-year loss following heavy end-of-season mark-downs and disappointing summer-holiday sales.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'13"

12:19
Mighty River to close Southdown power station
BODY:
Mighty River Power says the closure of its gas-fired Southdown power station in Auckland will not affect its ability to supply power to its customers.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'18"

12:20
Bathurst CEO resigns
BODY:
The chief executive of struggling coal miner, Bathurst Resources, has stepped down after seven years at the helm.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'04"

12:21
Xero updates software: improves appeal to US market
BODY:
Xero has significantly updated its software, filling a gap in its product offering to include an inventory and online quote function and other sought-after features.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'22"

12:24
Midday Markets for 24 March 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Angus Marks at First NZ Capital.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'02"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
Excitement in the Black Caps camp as their semi-final looms.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'01"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Afternoons===
=DESCRIPTION=

Information and debate, people and places around NZ

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13:10
Your Song - Prairie Lullaby
BODY:
Prairie Lullaby by Jimmie Rodgers. Chosen by Pokey La Farge.
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Duration: 10'19"

13:20
TV Review - Irene Gardiner
BODY:
Irene Gardiner reviews Offspring, TV ONE, Thursday nights at 8.30pm, and Nashville, TV ONE, Saturday nights at 9.30pm.
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Duration: 10'18"

13:25
Books - Wendyl Nissen
BODY:
Maori Made Easy, and Swallow This, the two books today.
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Tags: books
Duration: 11'05"

13:40
Music - Colin Morris
BODY:
Bella Vista Social Club and Eberhard Weber up for discussion this week.
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Duration: 13'36"

13:55
Web - Daniela Moate-Cox
BODY:
Netflix and gaming.
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Duration: 5'38"

14:10
Sirocco turns 18 - Daryl Eason
BODY:
Sirocco the kakapo turns 18 today. DOC Kakapo Recovery expert Daryl Eason speaks to Noelle McCarthy.
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Sirocco 2011. Photo CC BY 3.0 Department of Conservation.
There are only 126 Kakapo in existence, and the most famous is Sirocco.
He shot to fame after an encounter with Stephen Fry and his cameraman in 2009.

Since then Sirocco's become a global sensation, and New Zealand's official spokesbird for conservation.
He visited parliament last year, and he has more than 137,000 fans on facebook, and (of course) he regularly tweets to his 10,700 Twitter followers.
This week has been an extra special one for the cheeky mountain parrot. He turned 18 on Monday.
Daryl Eason is DOC's technical officer for Kakapo and Takahe and has known Sirocco since he was a chick.
From Invercargill, Daryl talks to Noelle McCarthy on Afternoons.
Photo: Sirocco and his human 'mum' Daryl Eason, 18 years ago. CC BY 3.0 Department of Conservation.
Explore the Radio New Zealand bird collection
Topics: environment
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Tags: kakapo, Sirocco, bird
Duration: 11'59"

14:45
Feature Album - James Taylor
BODY:
James Taylor's self titled debut album from 1968.
Topics: music
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Duration: 17'14"

15:10
Museum visits for the blind - Simon Morton from This Way Up
BODY:
What's it like to visit a museum or gallery if you're blind? We go for a tour with qualified audio describer Bruce Roberts and Lisette Wesseling around the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.
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Tags: museums
Duration: 15'40"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 24 March 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
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Duration: 16'45"

21:06
Black Petrels - New Zealand's Most At-Risk Seabird
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Black petrels are a common sight at sea in the Hauraki Gulf, and are at risk from being accidentally caught by recreational and commercial fishers
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By Alison Ballance
“The clackers stand outside their burrows and call at the top of their lungs trying to attract a female in. They’re single males, so they’re trying to attract a new girlfriend. At the moment we call them the ‘Desperate Dans’, because it’s near the end of the [breeding] season and they’re still trying to get a girlfriend.” Seabird researcher Biz (Elizabeth) Bell.

Black petrels (which are also called Parkinson’s petrels) are a familiar seabird sight in the outer Hauraki Gulf. But although they’re a very visible bird, they‘re listed as nationally vulnerable, and are recognised as being the seabird most at risk from commercial fishing. There are just 2500 breeding pairs of black petrels, and their total population, according to Biz Bell from Wildlife Management International, is somewhere between 11,000 and 21,000 birds. Biz says the population most likely numbers about 15,000, which includes young birds and non-breeders (black petrels don’t usually begin breeding until they are 4-5 years old).
The single ‘clacking’ males begin their efforts to attract a mate in October, and they may carry on through until the end of February. During that time they call every night for most of the might. They have cleaned out a nesting burrow, which is excavated underground amongst the roots of trees, which they hope will meet the approval of a female attracted by the sound of their clacking.
In late summer, the other night-time sounds on the high slopes of Great Barrier Island’s Hirakimata/Mount Hobson, according to Biz, are “lovers. A male has managed to get hold of a female, and they’re canoodling n the burrow, basically, getting to know each other, pair-bonding and getting ready to pair up the following year to breed.”
Meantime, early February is also when this year’s black petrel chicks are just starting to hatch. With so much black petrel activity happening, February is a key time of the year for Biz Bell, who visits the black petrel colony for up to three weeks to monitor hatching success in the 427 study burrows, look for new burrows and band any unbanded birds.
Biz has been studying the birds since 1995, and the annual February trip is one of three trips she makes to the colonies on Great Barrier Island and Hauturu/Little Barrier Island each year. In those 19 years she has banded more than 2000 adult birds, and 2500 chicks. Only 204 of those banded chicks have returned to the colony, and Biz says this low survival rate of less than 10% does not bode well for the future of the species and is something they are working to change.
Although rats and feral cats predate on chicks and adult birds on land, the main threat to black petrels comes from both commercial and recreational fishers in the outer Hauraki Gulf, which is a key feeding area for the birds when they are feeding chicks. The petrels are an accidental by-catch, which are attracted by bait and become hooked on fishing lines.
“Unfortunately the population is showing a slight decline. [But] we’re hoping we can change that around and as more people understand the risks to these birds we can help mitigate those risks.”

Biz is working with the Southern Seabird Solutions Trust, which is working with commercial fishers to find ways of preventing black petrels getting caught on fishing lines. Each year Biz hosts a number of fishers at the Mount Hobson research site, introducing them to the birds on land, and getting them used to gently handling birds, in case they need to remove birds from fishing gear at sea.
Once common all over the North Island and the top of the South Island, the stronghold for black petrels today is Mount Hobson on Great Barrier Island, with a small population on Hauturu/Little Barrier Island, and a few birds breeding in sanctuaries such as Windy Hill and Glenfern on Great Barrier Island.
Black petrels are long-lived – there are birds that were banded more than 30 years ago that are still breeding in the colony – and Biz says this reinforces the fact that to fully understand a species you need to study it for at least the duration of its life.
Luckily for the birds, even after 19 years, Biz is as enthusiastic as ever about black petrels.
“These birds are magic," says Biz. "Season 19, and I’ll keep doing it to 90 if I can. These birds are just incredible.”

You can find more stories about New Zealand seabirds in the Our Changing World bird collection.
According to the MPI web site ‘the National Plan of Action - Seabirds 2013 recognises New Zealand’s unique place in the world for seabirds and our desire to be at the leading edge of international seabird conservation.’
In a recent Our Changing World interview, Edward Abraham and Finlay Macdonald from Dragonfly Science talked with Alison Ballance about Analysing Seabird By-Catch in Fisheries and discussed how a recent analysis has highlighted a significant problem with by-catch of Parkinson’s black petrels in the Hauraki Gulf snapper fishery.
You'll find the audio links for the story 'Black petrels - New Zealand's most at-risk seabird' below:
Topics: environment
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Tags: seabirds, black petrel, fishing, fishery by-catch, endangered species, Great Barrier Island, Hauraki Gulf
Duration: 29'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Your Song
Prairie Lullaby by Jimmie Rodgers. Chosen by Pokey La Farge
1:20 The Critics
1. TV review - Irene Gardiner
2. Books - Wendyl Nissen
3. Music - Colin Morris
4. Web - Daniel Moate-Cox
2:10 Sirocco Turns 18 - Daryl Eason
Sirocco the kakapo turns 18 today. DOC Kakapo Recovery expert Daryl Eason speaks to Noelle McCarthy
2:20 The Black Box - BBC Witness
The story of the Black Box flight recorder and the man behind it, an inventive Australian fuels scientist, David Warren
2:30 NZ Reading - Double Happiness
Joe Bennett talks about the "post-hoc fallacy" with particular emphasis on claims of miracle cures and homeopathy
2:45 Feature album - James Taylor
James Taylor's self titled debut album from 1968
3:10 Museum Visits For The Blind - Simon Morton (This Way Up)
What's it like to visit a museum or gallery if you're blind? We go for a tour with qualified audio describer Bruce Roberts and Lisette Wesseling around the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
3:35 Our Changing World - Alison Ballance
Black petrels are a familiar sight around the Hauraki Gulf, but they're also one of New Zealand's rarer seabirds - and the one most at-risk from commercial fishing. Alison Ballance joins researcher Biz (Elizabeth) Bell to find out about her 19 years working with the birds on Great Barrier Island
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
With Simon Mercep, Zoe George, Chris Trotter and Julia Hartley Moore

MUSIC DETAILS

Tuesday 24 March
YOUR SONG:
ARTIST: Jimmie Rodgers
TITLE: Prairie Lullaby
COMP: William Joseph Hill
ALBUM: (UNKNOWN)
LABEL: Victor
THE CRITICS:
ARTIST: Buena Vista Social Club
TITLE: Macusa
COMP: Buena Vista Social Club
ALBUM: Buena Vista Social Club EP
LABEL: Mexican world music
ARTIST: Eberhard Weber
TITLE: Frankfurt
COMP: Eberhard Weber
ALBUM: Encore - All About Jazz
LABEL: ECM Records
FEATURE ALBUM:
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Carolina In My Mind
COMP: James Taylor
ALBUM: James Taylor
LABEL: APPLE 905811
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Something In The Way She Moves
COMP: James Taylor
ALBUM: James Taylor
LABEL: APPLE 905811
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Rainy Day Man
COMP: Taylor, Wiesner
ALBUM: James Taylor
LABEL: APPLE 905811
PANEL HALF TIME:
ARTIST: Passenger
TITLE: Start A Fire
COMP: Passenger
ALBUM: Whispers
LABEL: Nettwerk

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 24 March 2015
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Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
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Duration: 16'45"

16:00
The Panel with Julia Hartley Moore and Chris Trotter (Part 1)
BODY:
St Bede's rowers;Job hunting with the GCSB.
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Duration: 23'23"

16:12
St Bede's rowers
BODY:
St Bede's school is grappling with a High Court injunction that over-rode their sending home of two boys after a breach at Auckland Airport. Christchurch lawyer Dr Duncan Webb talks about the judge's decision and the wider ramifications.
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Duration: 11'42"

16:20
Job hunting with the GCSB
BODY:
Edward Snowden documents show GCSB spied Tim Groser's rivals for the role of head of the WTO. We talk to privacy specialist lawyer Kathryn Dalziel from Taylor Shaw.
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Duration: 7'10"

16:30
The Panel with Julia Hartley Moore and Chris Trotter (Part 2)
BODY:
Rituals;Panel says;Netflix launches;Kids take the day off for cricket;Northland by election;Artificial Intelligence and relationships.
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Duration: 26'07"

16:35
Rituals
BODY:
A giant wooden tower built in the Northern Irish City of Londonderry was ritually set alight as a way of remembering and releasing the grief and anger over the Bloody Sunday killings in 1972. The healing power of rituals. Do they help us get over things?
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Duration: 4'47"

16:40
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Julia Hartley-Moore and Chris Trotter have been thinking about.
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Duration: 2'40"

16:45
Netflix launches
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US internet TV provider Netflix launches in NZ today. We talk to self-proclaimed iT geek Ben Gracewood about if it's any good.
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Duration: 7'13"

16:50
Kids take the day off for cricket
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Cricket a good reason to shut the school gates early. Is it?
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Duration: 1'54"

16:52
Northland by election
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More Northlanders enrolling for the by-election than the last general election. What can we surmise from this?
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Duration: 6'30"

16:57
Artificial Intelligence and relationships
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Writer Ray Kurzweil suggests human-AI romance could occur within 15 years. would you date an AI?
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Duration: 2'29"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme 6:35 Today in Parliament (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Tuesday 24 March 2015
BODY:
Live to the Black Caps semi final;Glenn Turner for more on Black Caps;PM warning Peters could stymie Korea FTA;Winston Peters responds;German tourist sentenced for fatally running stop sign;Jury sees moment Mark Lundy accused of murders;Fanzone pumping in Auckland for semi final;Police find oil slick in search for boy;Opposition accuse Govt of using spy agencies for its own purposes.
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Duration: 25'33"

17:07
Live to the Black Caps semi final
BODY:
First to the world cup cricket semi final at Eden Park. The Proteas won the toss and elected to bat. Trent Boult removed both South African opening batsmen before this, as Rilee Russouw went after Corey Anderson's first delivery.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 1'34"

17:10
Glenn Turner for more on Black Caps
BODY:
Former New Zealand player and selector Glenn Turner is watching the match from his home in Wanaka.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 2'43"

17:14
PM warning Peters could stymie Korea FTA
BODY:
The Prime Minister is warning that Winston Peters, could sink the just signed free trade agreement with Korea if he wins the Northland by-election.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
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Duration: 4'41"

17:17
Winston Peters responds
BODY:
New Zealand First does have members bill which aims to stop New Zealand governments allowing overseas investors to sue if their profits are threatened by domestic laws.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
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Duration: 2'38"

17:20
German tourist sentenced for fatally running stop sign
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A German tourist who killed a woman when he ran a stop sign in Canterbury has been disqualified from driving and ordered to pay fifteen thousand dollars to her family.
Topics: transport, crime
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Duration: 2'59"

17:25
Jury sees moment Mark Lundy accused of murders
BODY:
A Jury has seen a recorded interview in which Mark Lundy groaned and cried as a detective showed him a photo of his wife's injuries.
Topics: crime
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Duration: 2'59"

17:35
Market Update for 24 March 2015
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The New Zealand dollar has continued to strengthen against the US dollar.
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Duration: 2'26"

17:38
Police find oil slick in search for boy
BODY:
The police have confirmed they have found an oil slick on the surface of Curio Bay in the Catlins where the search for a missing 11 year old boy is focussed.
Topics: crime
Regions: Southland
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Duration: 2'53"

17:40
Fanzone pumping in Auckland for semi final
BODY:
Rain has suspended the cricket at Eden Park where South Africa is putting in a dominating batting performance against the Black Caps.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 1'43"

17:42
Opposition accuse Govt of using spy agencies
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Opposition parties have used Parliament's Question Time to accuse the Government of using the country's spy agencies for its own political purposes.
Topics: politics
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Duration: 2'59"

17:45
Maternity unit set to close permanently
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The moth-balled Stratford maternity unit in Taranaki looks set to close permanently.
Topics: health
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Duration: 3'19"

17:48
Maori in Auckland demand halt to wharf extensions
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A waka tour company has joined Auckland's largest hapu in demanding the plan by the Ports of Auckland to build two wharf extensions be stopped.
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Duration: 3'14"

17:50
Closing arguments in the Prasad murder trial
BODY:
A defence lawyer of a man accused of burning a man to death says it was not an execution, but an attempt to hide evidence and avoid any responsibility for his death.
Topics: crime
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Duration: 5'09"

17:52
Minister defends housing sell-off
BODY:
The Government is not ruling out selling off thousands of state houses to private developers.
Topics: politics, housing
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Duration: 2'51"

18:06
Sports News for 24 March 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
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Duration: 3'14"

18:12
More on the Black Caps semi final
BODY:
Now to Eden Park where rain has stopped play between New Zealand and South Africa for more than an hour.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 2'12"

18:15
English denies scaremongering over Northland
BODY:
The deputy Prime Minister, Bill English, says he's not scaremongering by raising fears about the future of trade deals if Winston Peters wins this weekend's Northland by-election.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
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Duration: 2'40"

18:18
Peters hits back over trade deal
BODY:
In Seoul, John Key, a day on from signing the FTA, had this to say about Winston Peters and the trade deal.
Topics: politics
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Tags: trade
Duration: 2'06"

18:21
Police bust black market synthetic cannabis ring in Chch flat
BODY:
The police say they have busted a black market synthetic cannabis ring being run out of a central Christchurch flat.
Topics: crime
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Tags: synthetic cannabis
Duration: 1'24"

18:25
Rugby forward fined $20,000 after calling opponents faggots
BODY:
Campaigners against homophobia in sport are welcoming the heavy fine levied against a New South Wales forward after he called ACT Brumbies players faggots at the weekend.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 3'37"

18:35
Head of Ak Grammar backs St Bede's decision
BODY:
The head of Auckland Grammar is backing St Bede's decision to pull two students from a sports event, and says the matter should never have ended up in court.
Topics: sport, education
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Duration: 6'41"

18:48
Te Manu Korihi for 24 March 2015
BODY:
A waka tour company has joined Auckland's largest hapu in demanding the plan by the Ports of Auckland to build two wharf extensions be stopped; Three highschool teams from French Polynesia are taking part in this year's National Secondary Schools' Waka Ama Championships in Rotorua; A hui's being held in Kaikohe tomorrow aimed at reducing cot death - or Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy.
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Duration: 3'28"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 24 March 2015 - evening edition
BODY:
Ministers face questions about Housing & Workplace Relations.
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Duration: 5'13"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 The Sampler: A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys: Ex-Smuggler - Part 2
BODY:
Nelson lad Ian Gillespie is now a consultant winemaker, but in the late 1970s he assisted in the smuggling of motorised vehicles from Munich into Tehran.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Iran, smuggling
Duration: 17'07"

20:42
Economics
BODY:
There's no such thing as a free lunch - with independent scholar Brian Easton... economic inequality
EXTENDED BODY:

Food kitchen
Independent economic scholar Brian Easton has studied income distribution and economic inequality in New Zealand since the 1930s.
He says that before the second world war income inequality was greater than it is today. After the war there were more jobs available, so anyone who wanted a job could have one. Also large numbers of women were joining the workforce for the first time, and urban drift by Maori meant more people were earning an income.
The biggest impact on income inequality in New Zealand came in the late 1980s/early 90s, as Rogernomics evolved into Ruthanasia - income tax cuts for the well off and the cutting of a tax on dividends, followed by the cutting of social welfare payments in 1991 led to a wider gap between rich and poor. The number of children living in poverty had doubled by the early 1990s. The 1987 stock market crash also had a negative impact, and many people were worse off in the 90s than they had been in the 80s.
Income inequality in New Zealand has remained relatively stable since the 90s.
Brian Easton talks to Brian Crump.
Topics: economy, business, history, life and society
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Tags: inequality
Duration: 17'17"

20:59
Conundrum Clue 3
BODY:
Listen in on Friday night for the answer.
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Duration: 31"

21:59
Conundrum Clue 4
BODY:
Listen in on Friday night for the answer
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Duration: 29"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:10 Our Own Odysseys: Ex-Smuggler - Part 2
Nelson lad Ian Gillespie is now a consultant winemaker, but in the late 1970s he assisted in the smuggling of motorised vehicles from Munich into Tehran.
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 24 March 2015
BODY:
This week in The Sampler Nick Bollinger reviews a genre-mixing new album from Trinity Roots; a solo debut from Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens; and talks to Americana veteran Dave Alvin about his brother, the blues, and the songs of Big Bill Broonzy.
EXTENDED BODY:

TrinityRoots. Photo supplied.
This week in The Sampler Nick Bollinger reviews a genre-mixing new album from Trinity Roots; a solo debut from Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens; and talks to Americana veteran Dave Alvin about his brother, the blues, and the songs of Big Bill Broonzy.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music review
Duration: 29'45"

19:30
Citizen by Trinity Roots
BODY:
Nick Bollinger immerses himself in the genre-mixing new album from TrinityRoots.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger immerses himself in the genre-mixing new album from TrinityRoots.
It’s eleven years since the last studio album from Trinity Roots and a lot has happened in that time, some of which is reflected in this record. The drumming of new member Ben Lemi – fluid, playful and polyrhythmic – contrasts with the more streamlined funk Riki Gooch bought to the earlier records. Also, since the Trinity last hit the studio, Warren Maxwell has led the Little Bushmen quartet whose style leaned much closer to Hendrix and Led Zeppelin than the more reggae and soul-driven Trinity. And some of that electricity has carried over to this latest album, particularly in that heavy metal-meets-Maori melody of the opening track. But the most profound development might be found in Warren Maxwell’s writing. Always a thoughtful, personal lyricist, prone to the odd political parable, this time around he isn’t holding back. He’s called the album Citizen for a reason. These are the songs of a citizen, exercising his right to speak truth to power.
Songs Featured: Bully, Citizen, Haiku, El Kaptain, Village Man, Clarity
Listen to more from The Sampler here
Topics: music
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Tags: Trinity Roots, Warren Maxwell, music review
Duration: 7'49"

19:30
Common Ground -The Songs of Bill Broonzy by Dave and Phil Alvin
BODY:
Nick Bollinger talks to Americana veteran Dave Alvin about his brother, the blues, and the songs of Big Bill Broonzy.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger talks to Americana veteran Dave Alvin about his brother, the blues, and the songs of Big Bill Broonzy.
As The Blasters, brothers Phil and Dave Alvin made three studio albums between 1981 and 1985, mostly of Dave Alvin’s original songs, before going their separate ways; Phil to pursue his parallel interest in mathematics, Dave to build a solo career around his own great songs. Last year the pair reunited for their first joint recordings since the Blasters days to pay homage to one of their shared heroes, the great bluesman Big Bill Broonzy. Now the pair are coming to New Zealand for the first time, with shows at Auckland’s Tuning Fork and Wellington’s Bodega.
Songs Featured: Go Go Go, Keep A Knockin’, Border Radio, All By Myself, Key To The Highway, Stuff They Call Money, 4th Of July
Listen to more from The Sampler here

Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Dave Alvin, music review
Duration: 15'31"

19:30
Tomorrow is my Turn by Rhiannon Giddens
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks out the solo debut from Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks out the solo debut from Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens.
For the past decade Rhiannon Giddens has been the wonderful singer, banjoist and sometimes violin player for the North Carolina string band The Carolina Chocolate Drops. But she’s recently branched out, first playing alongside Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford and others on The New Basement Tapes, and now with her first solo album. On Tomorrow Is My Turn Giddens doesn’t exactly makes the collection of classic folk, blues and country songs her own, or if that is even what she’s trying to do. But she sings them like she feels them and loves them. And that, combined with T-Bone Burnett’s spare yet spectacular production, makes it an album that, in turn, is very easy to love.
Songs Featured: Last Kind Words, Don’t Let It Trouble Your Mind, Tomorrow Is My Turn, Black Is The Colour, Up Above My Head
Listen to more from The Sampler here

Topics: music
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Tags: Rhiannon Giddens, music review
Duration: 6'19"

7:30 The Sampler
A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases.
8:10 Windows on the World
International public radio documentaries - visit the Windows on the World web page to find links to these documentaries.
8:40 Economics
is there's no such thing as a free lunch - with independent scholar Brian Easton... economic inequality
9:06 The Tuesday Feature: Margaret Mahy Memorial Lecture by Elizabeth Knox
An intensely personal memoir by one of the country's leading writers of fantasy, exploring the roots of her interest in alternative reality, and intertwining her own story, and that of her family into a remarkable account of a writer and her times.
10:00 Late Edition
A review of the news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 The Shed
Award winning former British broadcaster Mark Coles presents his pick of the best new music releases and demos from around the planet. A glorious mix of brand new sounds from all over the world, real conversations with music makers and tales of everyday life as seen from an English garden shed

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

An intensely personal memoir by one of the country's leading writers of fantasy (1 of 5)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Award winning former British broadcaster Mark Coles presents his pick of the best new music releases and demos from around the planet. A glorious mix of brand new sounds from all over the world, real conversations with music makers and tales of everyday life as seen from an English garden shed (F, MCM)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274279

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 19:00:00

Date 24 Mar 2015

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