Radio New Zealand National. 2015-08-16. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

16 August 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday; 3:05 The 10PM Question, by Kate de Goldi (7 of 10, RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

A Very Obliging Horse, by David Somerset, told by Peter Vere-Jones; Sandy, by David Somerset, told by Fiona Samuel; The Gross Food Party, by Kath Beattie, told by Peter Vere Jones; Moving On, by David Hill, told by Bruce Phillips; Day Dreams, by Kelly Haitana, told by Rima Te Wiata; No Big Deal, by David Hill, told by Gary Young

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, music and including: 7:43 The Week in Parliament: An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ) 8:10 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ) 9:06 Mediawatch: Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:12
Leader calls for support for West Papua
BODY:
The exiled West Papuan dissident, Octovanius Mote, represents resistance groups in his Indonesia-ruled homeland and he's calling for New Zealand to support the Melanesian state in next month's Pacific Islands Forum.
Topics: Pacific, politics, inequality, international aid and development, conflict, history
Regions:
Tags: West Papua, Morning Star, Indonesia, msg
Duration: 14'26"

07:25
Commentary on Bledisloe Cup decider
BODY:
Radio NZ rugby reporter Barry Guy on Saturday night's trans-Tasman test.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: All Blacks, wallabies
Duration: 4'52"

07:45
The Week In Parliament for Sunday 16 August 2015
BODY:
Flag Referendums Bill clears final hurdle; Estimates Bill also progresses; Debate and questions on the decision to place Solid Energy into voluntary administration; David Seymour's Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Extended licensing hours during Rugby World Cup) Bill passes first reading, as does David Parker’s Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill; Finance Minister faces questions about the economy in the wake of falling dairy prices; Questions also to the PM about the "Saudi Farm Deal"; Social Services Committee hears submissions on the Support for Children in Hardship Bill; Petition on goat welfare tabled.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: parliament
Duration: 14'52"

07:50
Sequencing Taonga Genomes
BODY:
Dr Peter Dearden and his proposal to sequence 100 so-called Taonga Genomes - the genetic blueprints of New Zealand's most treasured native species.
Topics: te ao Maori, science, environment
Regions: Otago
Tags: kiwi, native species, genomes, genetics
Duration: 10'27"

08:12
Insight for 16 August 2015 - State Housing & Oz Providers
BODY:
Philippa Tolley travels to Queensland to find out how housing providers interested in NZ operate at home
EXTENDED BODY:
As New Zealand has pushed ahead with plans for state housing, across the Tasman, Queensland has called a halt on proposals to move virtually all its stock over to community housing providers.
A new state government came in earlier this year and it has radically changed direction.
Listen to Insight: State Housing and Oz Providers
Current Queensland state housing minister Leeanne Enoch wanted the percentage of public housing transferred to not-for-profit sector management to stay at about 30 percent, while she made sure everything was working out as planned.
The previous administration had a target of a 90 percent transfer by 2020.
But one project too far down the line to be stopped was a renewal project for Logan, not far from Brisbane. The city has a very high proportion of public housing and provided accommodation for lower paid workers. The transfer of stock to the management of the not-for-profit sector was the largest ever undertaken either in the state or across Australia.
"We're looking at a whole geographic location we are handing over," Ms Enoch said.
A provider that was part of the new group set up for the initiative was Compass, one of the groups that has flagged interest in taking part in the transfer of state housing stock in New Zealand.
Compass is one of Australia's largest community housing providers and has joined forces with a not-for-profit developer for the huge undertaking in Logan.
The initiative was designed as a 20-year project and according to the director of Logan City Community Housing, Lyndall Robertshaw, nearly 5000 homes will be transferred. As with the plans for the sale or lease of state housing in New Zealand, there will also be redevelopment and stock renewal.

But such change prompts fears among those living in public housing. Security of lease and rent are said to be top of tenants' concerns when the management of their new homes moves from public housing to community providers. Efforts have been made to allay those fears with extensive consulation and community meetings, Mr Robertshaw said.
One long-term advocate and public housing tenant in Logan, Jessie Scott, described the proposals for her home town as exciting, but she is desperate that the community's voice is heard as well.
"Tenants are the eyes and ears on the ground and can feed information back to the housing providers when things are going wrong and need fixing," she said.
Just as in New Zealand, Australia has problems with too many three-bedroom homes and not enough accommodation for indiviudals.
But Ms Scott was worried that planners were not taking into account how people live from day to day.
"We're stopping community, because you're having one-bedroom places so that when someone gets sick, there's nowhere for someone else ( to stay ) to help them, like for family to come."

The Housing Minister grew up in Logan and still has friends and family living there.
"I have to answer to my old school mates and neighbours every time I go home," she said.
But it's more than just local accountability. Ms Enoch wanted to test the whole premise that transferring stock in this way is the best option for providing homes for those who, for one reason or another, struggle to put a roof over their heads.
"There are a lot of things to pay close attention to; we need to be testing some of those philosophies ... my biggest concerns are about the people who access these properties. We want to be able to protect people and make sure they are taken care of. So we want to make sure we are not seeing rents increase because the (not-for-profit) sector wants to expand for some reason," she said.
"I want to be bold and innovative and think, 'Is this the way forward?" but I also want to be cautious on the behalf of the people we will be serving."

More on this story
Follow Insight on Twitter

Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: community housing, state housing, Queensland
Duration: 28'05"

08:40
Peter Campbell - Cancer Genes and Treatment
BODY:
Dr Peter Campbell is Head of Cancer Genetics and Genomics at the Sanger Institute, a research body focused on understanding the role of genetics in health and disease.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'37"

09:06
Mediawatch for 16 August 2015
BODY:
The new TV3 news show picking up where Campbell Live left off; Sky cops flak for Sky Go no-go and Daily Show no-show, and; too many pale males hogging prime airtime?
Topics: media, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30'49"

09:40
Netball World Cup Sydney
BODY:
Radio NZ sports reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe from Sydney on the morning of the final of the Netball World Cup 2015.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Netball World Cup, sport, netball, Silver Ferns
Duration: 5'57"

09:40
Shanti Freed - Inflatable Art
BODY:
'Exxopolis' is a network of winding tubes and soaring domes spanning more than a hundred square meters in size - it's an installation that will be touring various New Zealand locations. The exhibition manager for Architects of Air is Shanti Freed.
EXTENDED BODY:
...a dazzling maze of winding paths and soaring domes where Islamic architecture, Archimedean solids and Gothic cathedrals meld into an inspiring monument to the beauty of light and colour.

A gigantic inflatable artwork has been unveiled in New Plymouth as part of the Taranaki International Arts Festival.
More than a hundred square meters in size the ‘Exxopolis’ is a network of winding tubes and soaring domes.
The experience of standing inside has been compared to going inside a cathedral or a mosque, or an artery or spaceship.
Wallace speaks to Shanti Freed, the exhibition manager for Architects of Air.
Exxopolis will be on display at four different festivals

Taranaki Intertational Arts Festival
Christchurch Arts Festival
Auckland Live
Tauranga Arts Festival

Topics: arts
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: installation
Duration: 7'03"

10:10
Harko Brown - Ngā Taonga Tākaro
BODY:
Harko Brown is organising the New Zealand team for the World Indigenous Games to be held in Brazil at the end of October. It's no ordinary sports competition - team members will be performing kapa haka, weaving and taking part in kōrero with other indigenous peoples, as well as demonstrating a number of nga taonga takaro - or traditional Maori games - which reflect Maori philosophies and values.
EXTENDED BODY:
Harko Brown is organising the New Zealand team for the World Indigenous Games to be held in Brazil at the end of October. New Zealand is sending a team of 50, including 20 rangatahi chosen for their involvement in traditional Māori games.
It's no ordinary sports competition – team members will be performing kapa haka, weaving and taking part in kōrero with other indigenous peoples, as well as demonstrating a number of ngā taonga tākaro (traditional Māori games (pdf)) which reflect Māori philosophies and values.
Wallace Chapman talks to Harko Brown about the event.
More about ki-o-rahi
Topics: te ao Maori, identity, sport, education
Regions:
Tags: ki-o-rahi, hakinakina, indigenous peoples
Duration: 17'08"

10:35
Ronnie Burkett - Puppet Cabaret
BODY:
Canadian Ronnie Burkett is a star of the puppetry world - he's been working with marionettes since the tender age of seven. He's about to bring his critically acclaimed show The Daisy Theatre to New Zealand and he tells us about the fascinating process of creating a cabaret show with puppets.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'15"

11:10
Bill Bryson - A Walk on the Big Screen
BODY:
One the world's most popular writers, Bill Bryson's book A Walk in the Woods has just been made into a feature film starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte. Bill Bryson discusses the story, the film and what it's like to have one of the greatest movie stars portraying you on the big screen.
EXTENDED BODY:
One the world's most popular writers, Bill Bryson's book A Walk in the Woods has just been made into a feature film starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte.
Bill Bryson discusses the story, the film and what it's like to have one of the greatest movie stars portraying you on the big screen.
Topics: author interview, books
Regions:
Tags: Bill Bryson, film
Duration: 14'25"

11:10
Liam Scarlett - Ballet’s Hot Property
BODY:
British choreographer Liam Scarlett has been called the 'great white hope' of British ballet and is the Royal Ballet's first Artist in Residence. In what's been described as a major coup for the Royal New Zealand Ballet, he's choreographed its latest production - A Midsummer Night's Dream.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'31"

11:40
Greg Haver - David Bowie Is
BODY:
Greg Haver is a musician and award-winning producer, having worked with the likes of The Manic Street Preachers, Super Furry Animals and Catalonia. He's also a major David Bowie fan and he's on the show to review the David Bowie Is exhibition, currently on in Melbourne.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'01"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:08 Current affairs
Octovanius Mote represents resistance groups in Indonesia-ruled West Papua and he’s calling for NZ to support his country in next month’s Pacific Islands Forum; Barry Guy on Saturday night’s Bledisloe Cup decider; Dr Peter Dearden and his proposal to sequence 100 so-called Taonga Genomes – the genetic blueprints of New Zealand's most treasured native species. Plus: The Week in Parliament.

8:12 Insight State Housing and Oz Providers
The date is looming for the first lot of state housing to be sold off or leased to charities, iwi and business. At least one community housing provider in Australia has expressed interest in taking part. In this week’s Insight, Philippa Tolley reports from Queensland on why Australian providers would be interested and explores how they operate at home.
8:40 Peter Campbell – Cancer Genes and Treatment
Dr Peter Campbell is Head of Cancer Genetics and Genomics at the Sanger Institute, a research body focused on understanding the role of genetics in health and disease. He trained at Otago University and he talks to Wallace about some of the astonishing advances taking place in both the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Dr Peter Campbell (right) visits the Otago Zebrafish Facility with former University of Otago pathology department head, Dr Colin Geary
9:06 Mediawatch
Mediawatch looks at the new TV3 news show that’s picked up where Campbell left off, and a claim that too many pale males are hogging primetime. Also: Sky TV copping flak for some recent failures, and why local fans of The Daily Show are bitter about our broadcasters.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Bridget Tunnicliffe – Netball World Cup
Radio NZ sports reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe reports from Sydney on the eve of the final of the Netball World Cup.
9:45 Shanti Freed – Inflatable Art
A gigantic inflatable artwork has been unveiled in New Plymouth as part of the Taranaki International Arts Festival. More than a hundred square meters in size the ‘Exxopolis’ is a network of winding tubes and soaring domes. The experience of standing inside has been compared to a combination of being inside a church merged with a network of human blood vessels. Wallace speaks to Shanti Freed, the exhibition manager for Architects of Air.
[gallery:1332]
10:06 Harko Brown – Nga Taonga Takaro
Harko Brown is organising the New Zealand team for the World Indigenous Games to be held in Brazil at the end of October. It’s no ordinary sports competition – team members will be performing kapa haka, weaving and taking part in kōrero with other indigenous peoples, as well as demonstrating a number of nga taonga takaro – or traditional Maori games – which reflect Maori philosophies and values.
10:25 Ronnie Burkett – Puppet Cabaret
Canadian Ronnie Burkett is a star of the puppetry world – he’s been working with marionettes since the tender age of seven. He’s about to bring his critically acclaimed show The Daisy Theatre to New Zealand and he tells us about the fascinating process of creating a cabaret show with puppets.
11:05 Bill Bryson – A Walk on the Big Screen
One the world’s most popular writers, Bill Bryson’s book A Walk in the Woods has just been made into a feature film starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte. Bill Bryson discusses the story, the film and what it’s like to have one of the greatest movie stars portraying you on the big screen.
11:25 Liam Scarlett – Ballet’s Hot Property
British choreographer Liam Scarlett is one of ballet’s hottest properties. He’s been called the ‘great white hope’ of British ballet and is the British Royal Ballet’s first Artist in Residence. In what’s been described as a major coup for the Royal New Zealand Ballet, he’s choreographed its latest production – A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Liam Scarlett joins Wallace live from Wellington ahead of the premiere.

Liam Scarlett in rehearsal
11:40 Greg Haver – David Bowie Is
Greg Haver is a musician and award-winning producer, having worked with the likes of The Manic Street Preachers, Super Furry Animals and Catalonia. He’s also a major David Bowie fan and he’s on the show to review the David Bowie Is exhibition, currently on in Melbourne.

===12:12 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

They came half way round the world to escape the stress of European life and enjoy a relaxed NZ life. Swiss-born Rita and Felix Schaad bought an old Northland dairy farm only to discover that it contained unique formations of basalt rock. Now they've spent years of hard labour, building bridges and pathways through the rocks to turn the land into a tourist attraction. Thousands come to "Wairere Boulders" each year (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:10
Wairere Treasure Trove
BODY:
A Swiss couple discover a rare geological treasure on their Northland property.

EXTENDED BODY:
A Swiss couple discover a rare geological treasure on their Northland property.
When we arrived in New Zealand to live, it felt like flying. No possessions, no ties. So you can do whatever you want!" Felix Schaad

They came half way round the world to escape the stress of Europe, and enjoy a relaxed New Zealand life. Swiss-born Rita and Felix Schaad bought an old Northland dairy farm only to discover that it contained rare and spectacular formations of “fluted” basalt rock.
Since then they’ve spent years of hard labour… building bridges and pathways through the valley of rocks, to turn it into a tourist attraction. Now thousands come to “Wairere Boulders” each year.
Engineer and geologist Felix arrived in New Zealand in 1983 with wife and daughter bringing little more than his guitars, Rita’s spinning and weaving equipment, toys and tools.
They lived in a caravan and a bus on the 150-hectare block at Horeke near the Hokianga Harbour and fifty kilometres from Kaikohe.
The locals called us the Gypsies, but we didn’t mind”, says Felix.

The couple captured wild goats on their property to farm them for the fibre, and in the process found the big eroded basalt boulders tumbling down a valley.
Fluted basalt is also known as Basalt “Karst”. It’s coined from the German name for the Kras Region, a limestone plateau in the Northern Adriatic, around the city of Trieste.
According to Auckland geologist Bruce Hayward basalt karst is found in several parts of Northland, but also at Stony Batter on Waiheke island, at Ti point an hour’s drive north of Auckland, and only recently on Norfolk Island. It’s also been recorded in Hawaii.
On his website Felix Schaad says the fluting is the “result of chemical leaching by acids generated by the Kauri forests that used to exist in the area”. Unusual he says, because Kauri grew in this basalt only because it is low in iron.
Geologist Bruce Hayward says the dissolution of the basalt is caused by leachate from the litter of trees and more likely the epiphytes that live under the canopy such as the native Astelia.The fluid slowly runs down the rocks over tens of thousands of years, creating the dramatic deeply set corrugations.
Why this has happened in such limited areas, Bruce suggests, could be a mixture of climate, plus the exposure of the rocks over such a long time. After all the rocks at Wairere Boulders are about 2.8 million years old!
So the big trees may be long gone, chopped down by early colonists. But the spectacular rocks remain.
Any day of the week at Wairere Boulders, small, olive-skinned Rita greets visitors with a wide smile from under her broad brimmed leather hat. Felix, with bushy white beard and hair, says he gets mistaken for Santa Claus particularly when he wears his orange boiler suit.
The Schaads have laid out a boulder loop boardwalk, a “Dragon’s Cave” and a bush pool in the “Nikau Forest”. Walking at a slow pace a visitor can spend as little as twenty minutes or as much as two hours there.
Felix says many who visit here are transformed by the experience of walking through the little valley of massive rocks. Felix believes he and Rita didn’t find the valley. It found them.
Topics: life and society, environment, history, farming
Regions: Northland
Tags: Wairere Boulders, basalt karst, fluted basalt, Horeke, Kaikohe, Zurich, goat farming, Stony Batter, Ti Point, Norfolk Island, Hawai'i, kauri
Duration: 21'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:40 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 3:04 The Drama Hour: Chance Meeting on Triton 9, by Justin Eade The time is the near future. NASA sends three Kiwi and Aussie astronauts on a mission, piloting the space shuttle. Our intrepid trio have a number of close encounters with alien life forms and find that inter-galactic diplomacy is a very fraught business indeed (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:25
Ten years of Wellington Community Choir
BODY:
Up to 400 choral singers from the lower North Island are combining their voices to mark the 10th anniversary of the Wellington Community Choir. It's been such a hit others have started up in other centres, like the Manawatu Community Choir and Hutt Valley Community Choir based on the same open access model. So what attracts people to a community choir and keeps them there? The anniversary concert is on the 29th of August 2015 at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.
EXTENDED BODY:

Up to 400 choral singers from the lower North Island are combining their voices to mark the 10th anniversary of the Wellington Community Choir. It's been such a hit others have started up in other centres, like the Manawatu Community Choir and Hutt Valley Community Choir based on the same open access model.
So what attracts people to a community choir and keeps them there?
The anniversary concert is on the 29th of August at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.
Related stories

Playing Favourites with Julian Raphael

Topics: music
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: choral, choir, Michael Fowler Centre
Duration: 13'01"

12:30
Face Forward: NZFW Model Castings
BODY:
The heat is on as designers make a push to complete their A/W 16 collections for New Zealand Fashion Week, 2015. But part of their process is also about finding the right talent to showcase their garments. Sonia Sly takes an inside look at model castings held at Auckland's Aotea Centre to find out who might be tipped as rising stars…
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand Fashion Week 2015 is almost upon us with designers pushing to complete their collections in the hopes of winning over media, and more importantly, gaining orders from potential buyers. Part of the process in the lead-up is making sure to cast the right models for their runway shows and various presentations.
Last weekend model castings were held at Aotea Centre where hundreds of models gathered nervously together, awaiting their chance to walk in front of designers.
Every year Murray Bevan, Director for Showroom 22 sits in on the casting. “They’ve got forty metres to make their mark. Some people I haven’t seen before and they did really well, but you can see the looks on their faces when they come through that door, they’re staring straight ahead like a horse about to bolt at a gate going, ‘Oh my God I hope I get this right.’
The pressure is on and it’s visible. Agents prep their models with tips about what to expect before filing into a narrow corridor where they must wait by an open door until their names are called one by one.
International model, Ashleigh Good, has been in the industry for the past three years and has already walked runway shows in New York, Milan and Paris. “I got nervous in there, I don’t know why,” she says. “It’s quite intimidating [in] a big room of designers.”
Good is also helping to coach models from RPD—her mother agency in New Zealand.
“It’s nice here. I’m with the girls that I mentor and I help them with walking lessons. Catwalk is a real thrill [and] it’s also quite a challenge. These girls here, know nothing of what it’s going to be like when they head overseas.”
Tipped as rising stars are two girls from 62 Models. Kizzie Amoore recently featured in the Kate Sylvester lookbook and editorials for Remix and Black Magazine, while Sophia Frankish has just been shot by David Shields for Blk on Blk, and featured in campaigns for Lonely Hearts and Miss Crabb.
The sixteen year-old-school girls are excited to be at New Zealand Fashion Week castings.
“I felt quite nervous, but it was such a rush and I really enjoyed it,” says Frankish, who adds that walking at New Zealand Fashion week last year helped to build her confidence as a model.
Both girls say that fashion week also provides plenty of time for networking and fun on the social front:
“There’s lots of Instagramming going on,” says Kizzie, “I prefer shoots. I just think they’re really fun and you’ve got multiple chances to get the shot right, rather than catwalk where you’ve got one chance. It’s a little nerve-wracking.”
Marijke Van Dillen is an agent for 62 Models and has also walked at New Zealand Fashion week. Now in her early twenties she says she enjoys working with models because she can identify with what they’re going through.
“We’re really excited about Sophia and Kizzie. They’re doing really well locally and that’s a really good sign. We are going to push them overseas soon because it’s important that they take that step [and] hopefully they’ll end up doing the New York market or even the European market.”
62 Models hand-pick the girls and guys that bring to the casting call, where prerequisites include: presence on the runway, strong walks, great posture, symmetrical faces and a great attitude.
Van Dillen maintains that the industry and what it demands from models has changed over recent years. Looks and beauty are taken into consideration, but personality—along with how many followers a model has on Instagram—counts for a lot, especially in the international arena, and increasingly, requests come through regarding details about a model’s social media following.
“That means the designer gets more reach. If they get a beautiful model who has 20,000 followers on instagram in their show, it’s very likely that that model is going to post up about that show.”
Van Dillen says that a few thousand followers in New Zealand is considered reasonably good, but she adds that while it’s imperative to have growing social media profiles for the international market, not having a social media account can work in one’s favour and can add to a bit of mystery, which some designers prefer. “It’s not a hundred percent of the time that that’s the way it rolls, but that’s a trend that we’ve found,” she says.
Listen to the audio to hear the full story.
New Zealand Fashion week runs from 24-30 August, 2015.
Sonia Sly will be covering New Zealand Fashion Week 2015 with reviews for the Radio New Zealand National website, whilst also keeping a daily diary on her blog to provide an inside view into week-long event.
Topics: arts, media, life and society, technology
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Showroom 22, New Zealand Fashion Week, models, fashion, Instagram, New York, RPD Models, 62 Models, beauty, design
Duration: 15'18"

12:51
Farley’s Arcade
BODY:
In 1865 during the heady gold rush years the wild west township of Dunedin officially became a city. This year, the Edinburgh of the South celebrates 150 years since the event. Many of the city's artists have got into the spirit of the occasion, signing up for a new multi-media production called Farley's Arcade: The Wildest Place in Town. Visitors will step back in time as they visit a recreated shopping arcade and theatre underground. The performance season of Farley's Arcade: The Wildest Place in Town is 28 August - 6 September.
Topics: history
Regions: Otago
Tags: theatre
Duration: 16'18"

13:34
Fiona Pardington: A beautiful hesitation
BODY:
Thirty years worth of negatives, contacts and ditigal images were looked through as photographer Fiona Pardington worked on an exhibition and book about her life's work. Fiona is of Maori and Scottish descent, and holds a Doctorate in Fine Arts from the University of Auckland. She's brought us new ways to look at the female body, Maori taonga and museum exhibits tucked away in vaults around the world. In between undertaking ambitious photography projects that require both skill and diplomacy - museums don't let just anyone into their storage areas - where she has photographed hei tiki, death masks and foetal skeletons among other things long forgotten. Her large format photography has been on show here and internationally in galleries and museums and at biennales. Wellington is about to see her 30 year retrospective - A beautiful hesitation, at City Gallery.
EXTENDED BODY:
Thirty years worth of negatives, contacts and ditigal images were looked through as photographer Fiona Pardington worked on an exhibition and book about her life's work.
Fiona, who is of Māori and Scottish descent and holds a Doctorate in Fine Arts from the University of Auckland, has brought us new ways to look at the female body, taonga and museum exhibits tucked away in vaults around the world.
Her ambitious photography projects require both skill and diplomacy. Museums don't let just anyone into their storage areas, where she has photographed hei tiki, death masks and foetal skeletons among other things long forgotten.
Her large format photography has been on show here and internationally in galleries and museums and at biennales. Wellington is about to see her 30 year retrospective - A beautiful hesitation, at City Gallery
Fiona talks to Lynn Freeman about the exhibition.
Topics: arts, te ao Maori
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: photography, Fiona Pardington
Duration: 11'28"

13:46
Quiz shows - NZ On Screen
BODY:
TVNZ is about to revive a very popular quiz shows: Mastermind. Can simple general knowledge compete with reality TV shows? Irene Gardiner from NZ On Screen has been rifling through shows from the heyday of the quiz shows.
EXTENDED BODY:
One thing the tidal wave of reality shows overwhelmed was the the once popular quiz show. But fear not, TVNZ is about to revive one of the most popular examples – the legendary Mastermind.
Irene Gardiner from NZ On Screen has been rifling through programmes from the heyday of the Kiwi quiz show.
Watch the clips referred to by Irene Gardiner in this story.

Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: television, quiz shows
Duration: 11'39"

14:08
The Laugh Track - The Watercooler
BODY:
Auckland's monthly The Watercooler event is a platform for a wide range of people to tell stories - sometimes true, sometimes totally made up. The Watercooler was created by Sarah Finnigan-Walsh and Romain Marceau, and this month they've expanded to Wellington.
EXTENDED BODY:
Auckland's monthly The Watercooler event is a platform for a wide range of people to tell stories – sometimes true, sometimes totally made up. The Watercooler was created by Sarah Finnigan-Walsh and Romain Marceau, and this month they've expanded to Wellington.
Topics: arts
Regions: Auckland Region, Wellington Region
Tags: storytelling, theatre, Basement, bats
Duration: 19'21"

14:24
Costume design for the Royal New Zealand Ballet
BODY:
It's a dream job - designing the set and costumes for the Royal New Zealand Ballet's brand spanking new production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Tracy Grant Lord designs for intimate theatre productions through to full-on, bells-and-whistles operas and ballets. Her latest project sees her trying a few new things and also wrestling with how to outfit her fairy dancers with wings that won't impede them on stage while still looking ethereal.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: ballet, RNZB, Shakespeare, costume, design, sets
Duration: 6'32"

14:34
A Crooked Rib: Lady Lucy Grey
BODY:
Governor Sir George Grey has had a lot of attention since he headed the young New Zealand Colony in the mid 19th century - in academia, in literature and even on screen. But little is known about his young wife, who struggled with her much older, distant and patronising husband, and the brave new world she was brought to. Wellington writer Judy Corballis has imagined Lucy's life in A Crooked Rib, published by Vintage.
Topics: arts, history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 19'03"

14:48
CLiK The Ensemble
BODY:
It's always a risk, forming a new chamber music trio. There's never a guarantee that there'll be the magic, the apparent telepathy, that makes an exceptional one.But there's a lot of confidence in three of New Zealand's top young chamber musicians who're forming a trio to celebrate the 50th Jubilee of the New Zealand Community Trust Chamber Music Contest. Pianist John Chen, cellist Edward King and violinist Natalie Lin have each been in trios that have won the title in the past. This though is the first time they have played in a trio together, it's call CLiK The Ensemble and is about to tour the country.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: chamber music, New Zealand Community Trust Chamber Music Contest
Duration: 11'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

Web exclusive: Ten years of Wellington Community Choir
Up to 400 choral singers from the lower North Island are combining their voices to mark the 10th anniversary of the Wellington Community Choir. It's been such a hit others have started up in other centres, like the Manawatu Community Choir and Hutt Valley Community Choir based on the same open access model. So what attracts people to a community choir and keeps them there? The anniversary concert is on the 29th of August at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

12:34 NZ Fashion Week
The heat is on as designers make a push to complete their Autumn/Winter collections for New Zealand Fashion Week, 2015. But part of their process is also about finding the right talent to showcase their garments. Sonia Sly takes an inside look at model castings held at Auckland’s Aotea Centre to find out who might be tipped as rising stars.

International model Ashleigh Good leads front and centre images by Sonia Sly
12:48 Farley’s Arcade
In 1865 during the heady gold rush years the wild west township of Dunedin officially became a city. This year, the Edinburgh of the South celebrates 150 years since the event. Many of the city's artists have got into the spirit of the occasion, signing up for a new multi-media production called Farley's Arcade: The Wildest Place in Town. Visitors will step back in time as they visit a recreated shopping arcade and theatre underground. The performance season of Farley’s Arcade: The Wildest Place in Town is Friday 28 August to Sunday 6 September.
1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris
This week the movies on offer are the latest Marvel Comics action heroes, Fantastic Four, and the acclaimed – and controversial – documentary about the late singer-songwriter Amy Winehouse.
1:34 Fiona Pardington: A beautiful hesitation
Thirty years worth of negatives, contacts and ditigal images were looked through as photographer Fiona Pardington worked on an exhibition and book about her life's work. Fiona is of Maori and Scottish descent, and holds a Doctorate in Fine Arts from the University of Auckland. She's brought us new ways to look at the female body, Maori taonga and museum exhibits tucked away in vaults around the world. In between undertaking ambitious photography projects that require both skill and diplomacy – museums don't let just anyone into their storage areas – where she has photographed hei tiki, death masks and foetal skeletons among other things long forgotten. Her large format photography has been on show here and internationally in galleries and museums and at biennales. Wellington is about to see her 30 year retrospective - A beautiful hesitation, at City Gallery, opening on Saturday.
1:46 Quiz shows - NZ On Screen
TVNZ is about to revive a very popular quiz shows: Mastermind. Can simple general knowledge compete with reality TV shows? Irene Gardiner from NZ On Screen has been rifling through programmes from the heyday of the kiwi quiz show.
2:05 The Laugh Track - The Watercooler
Auckland's monthly The Watercooler event is a platform for a wide range of people to tell stories – sometimes true, sometimes totally made up. The Watercooler was created by Sarah Finnigan-Walsh and Romain Marceau, and this month they've expanded to Wellington.
2:24 Costume design for the Royal New Zealand Ballet
It's a dream job – designing the set and costumes for the Royal New Zealand Ballet's brand spanking new production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Tracey Grant Lord designs for intimate theatre productions through to full-on, bells-and-whistles operas and ballets.Her latest project sees her trying a few new things and also wrestling with how to outfit her fairy dancers with wings that won't impede them on stage while still looking ethereal.

2:34 A Crooked Rib: Lady Lucy Grey
Governor Sir George Grey has had a lot of attention since he headed the young New Zealand Colony in the mid 19th century - in academia, in literature and even on screen. But little is known about his young wife, who struggled with her much older, distant and patronising husband, and the brave new world she was brought to. Wellington writer Judy Corballis has imagined Lucy's life in A Crooked Rib, published by Vintage.
2:44 CLiK
It's always a risk, forming a new chamber music trio. There's never a guarantee that there'll be the magic, the apparent telepathy, that makes an exceptional one.But there's a lot of confidence in three of New Zealand's top young chamber musicians who're forming a trio to celebrate the 50th Jubilee of the New Zealand Community Trust Chamber Music Contest. Pianist John Chen, cellist Edward King and violinist Natalie Lin have each been in trios that have won the title in the past. This though is the first time they have played in a trio together, it’s call CLiK and is about to tour the country.
3:05 The Drama Hour
We’ll be taken off planet to Triton 9 in a play by Justin Eade and we’ll hear a recording from way back in 1939. It’s a short tribute to Iris Wilkinson. Who?

===4:06 PM. | Sunday 4 'til 8===
=DESCRIPTION=

4:06 The War That Changed The World – Jordan: Redrawing the Map of the Middle East
How did World War One change the face of the Middle East? And, how did this seismic and controversial period shape the century to follow? Lyse Doucet presents a public debate from Amman in Jordan, with a panel of experts - in partnership with the British Council. (BBCWS)
5:00 The 5 O'Clock Report
A roundup of today's news and sport
5:11 Spiritual Outlook
Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)
5:40 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi
Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)
6:06 Te Ahi Kaa
Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)
7:06 One in Five
The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)
7:35 Voices
Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)
7:45 The Week in Parliament
An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:06
The impact of social bonds on mental health services
BODY:
Mike Gourley presents a range of perspectives on the impact of social bonds on mental health employment services.
EXTENDED BODY:
As of this year’s Budget, some $29 million has been set aside to introduce the practice of “social bonds" as a new way to fund and deliver social services – in this case, mental health vocational or employment services.
The idea’s a simple one. Take a social service –­­ like providing support to people with mental illness, and take it right through from help with daily living to getting and keeping a job – and find a private investor who is willing to stump up the cash to pay for it. If the agreed outcomes are met, the government will pay back the money, plus a reasonable return on investment.
Elsewhere in the world, it’s known as social impact bonds, but here, it’s known as a social bond. And it’s got the likes of the New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists (NZAP) hot under the collar. Kyle MacDonald is their public issues spokesperson and says the NZAP doesn’t believe an untried experiment should be imposed on the most vulnerable group in our society – people with significant mental health issues – especially when it comes to an expectation that such people will easily find and sustain paid employment.
Someone who’s a bit less hot under the collar is Marion Blake, chief executive officer of Platform Trust, an umbrella organisation for a brace of mental health services.
Marion Blake says that social bonds may free up philanthropic social investment to supplement government funding. And, more importantly, it should be recognised that people with mental health disability have expressed a desire to be placed in paid employment, but may not have been well served in the past.
A little more concerned is Garth Bennie. He’s the chief executive of the New Zealand Disability Support Network, another umbrella organisation, representing a wide range of services, mainly in the disability support sector.
Garth Bennie says it would have been nice to have had an extra $29 million invested in existing supported employment services, which have been historically "chronically underfunded". He says, "The move to a new, untried system of funding and delivery of such services is a bit of a side show, and we should not be fooled by the term “innovation”, because it is a new thing!"
Shirley Cressey is the founding manager of Earthlink – a social business that has enabled 800 people to find employment in a range of paid employment settings, from recycling to environmental waste management. She says she hasn’t received a lot of information about social bonds in her sector, but she’s open to any improvements they might encourage. According to the right-leaning think tank The New Zealand Initiative, which largely supports social bonds, it is still too early to tell whether they achieve what supporters claim.
However, Finance and Deputy Prime Minister, Bill English believes they are another tool for the government to use to improve job outcomes for people with mental health disabilities. And to those who doubt whether people versed in the language of investment and shares can determine what is a quality mental health job support service, he says that when it comes to a negotiation over outcomes, the expertise of mental health services will be deferred to.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: mental health services, social bonds
Duration: 30'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

4:07 The War That Changed The World – Jordan: Redrawing the Map of the Middle East
How did World War One change the face of the Middle East? And, how did this seismic and controversial period shape the century to follow? Lyse Doucet presents a public debate from Amman in Jordan, with a panel of experts - in partnership with the British Council.
The programme considers the impact of World War One and how its aftermath still overshadows the political landscape of the Middle East.
The Arab Revolt, launched by the Hashemite dynasty during World War One, unified resistance to the Ottomans and triggered the end of their rule of the Arab world. Strong hopes of a unified Arab state were dashed. Instead a patchwork of mandates, protectorates and colonial rule followed with a promise from the British prime minister that Jewish people would be given a "national home in Palestine".
The issues are discussed by three historians, Khaled Fahmy from the American University in Cairo, Mouin Rabbani of the Institute of Palestine Studies, and Ali Mahafza of the University of Jordan. Theatre director Lina Attel presents a personal essay on 'redrawing the map'. (BBCWS)
See the BBC website for more on this programme.
5:00 The 5 O'Clock Report
A roundup of today's news and sport.
5:12 Spiritual Outlook
Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)
5:40 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi
Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)
6:06 Te Ahi Kaa
Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)
7:06 One In Five
The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)
7:35 Voices
A weekly programme that highlights Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in New Zealand, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical for 16 August 2015 ( Part 1 )
BODY:
Stories of yesteryear from around New Zealand
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 54'21"

21:05
Sounds Historical for 16 August 2015 ( Part 2 )
BODY:
Stories of yesteryear from around New Zealand
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56'41"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:08 Today in New Zealand History
French settlers at Akaroa, 16 August 1840. 4'22'
8:14 Artist: Coral Cummins
Song: There's No You
Composer: Adair Hopper
Album: Radio NZ
Label: na 3'38"
8:18 Walter Reed
Walter Reed aged 99 was said to be the oldest licensed motorist in the world in 1959. He drove across the Auckland Harbour Bridge when it opened. He was interviewed by Dick Gutteridge. 5'39"
8:25 Pre-war memories of a Wartime Hero
The last of "the Dambusters" Les Monro of Tauranga died at the age of 94 on 4 August. We heard something of his wartime exploits in Sounds Historical that week, but not long before he died he told Lorna Perry something of his life and times and here we listen to tales of his early days and his efforts to join the air force as a pilot. 9'21'
8:36 Artist: The Four Lads
Song: Moments to Remember
Composer: Allan/Stillman
Album: Most Requested Songs of the 50s
Label: 3'13"
1955 hit - Canadian group Among the memories listed in the song included tearing down the goal post on New Year's Day, the quiet walks, the noisy fun, and the ballroom prize which they almost won. In the final stanza, they sing whenever they are separated from each other on the other days, that they will always remember those precious moments. All of those memories reflected the suburban lifestyle of the 1950s.
8:39 A Portrait of a Prime Minister
A "Guest of Honour" interview in 1974 in which Hamish Keith talks to Labour Prime Minister Bill Rowling a few months after he had taken up the new role following the death of Prime Minister Norman Kirk. Part 2 15"40"
8:53 War Report 49 16 August 2015
Ernest Harston describes the fighting at Chunuk Bair and the tunneling under the trenches. An extract from Cecil Malthus's book Anzac a Retrospect in which he describes the quieter routine after Chunuk Bair and a newspaper item telling of a mother receiving news of her son's death at Gallipoli on the day she had been informed he would be arriving home on the hospital ship.
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There's a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It's a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
Artist: Murray Johnson Song: Pack Up Your Trouble in Your Old kit Bag
Composer: Album: Songs of World War 1 Label; Geoentertainment 6'12"
9:04 As I Remember
Rabbiting by Allen Little of Levin. 4'01"
9:11 Paddy O'Donnell's descriptions of the "Wahine" in trouble at the entrance to Wellington Harbour, 10 April 1968 3'31'
Died August 2009
9:17 Artist: Doris Day
Song: Secret Love
Composer: Fain/Wesbter
Album: Most Requested Songs of the 50s
Label
From 1953 film "Calamity Jane" - won Academy Award 3'40"
9:20 Song and Story of the Māori
A programme recorded in the early 1950s for Radio New Zealand shortwave broadcast. This episode focuses on the work of Nuhaka musician and composer Walter Smith and features the Nuhaka Maori Choir, Aloha Orchestra and Nuhaka Trio Includes (in English and Maori) "Dear Old Maoriland" by Walter Smith, written for the Maori Agricultural College which was destroyed in the Hawkes Bay earthquake. New arrangment of "Hoki hoki tonu mai" by Walter Smith "Beneath the Maori Moon" by Walter Smith (George Nepia, who recorded the song, was a nephew of Smith). 'Kia Ngawari" arr. Walter Smith Narrated by Airini Grenell. Included in the Aloha Orchestra are Margery and Maurice Rowe. Margery is now 84 and still plays the steel guitar and marice alos still plays. The couple have been married for 64 years and Maurice is 90 today. 11'35"
9:33 Baden Hacche recalls his experiences as a service car driver on the East Coast from 1918 2'32"
9:37 Artist: Coral Cummins
Song: Long Ago and Far Away
Composer: Kern/Gershwin
Album: Radio NZ
Label: n/a 3'00"
At a Royal Concert, Dunedin 14 February 1963
9:42 Book of the Week
Horncastle's Hero or Hell Raiser by Graeme Horncastle.
Pavilions ISBN 978 0 473 31786 7 16'32"
The author describes the colourful life of Charlie Jacobson, the subject of his book.

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Hosted by the legendary Les Paul, you'll hear music and commentary by John Scofield, George Benson, Jim Hall and award-winning journalist Bill Milkowski. Classic, influential tracks by Django Reinhart, Wes Montgomery, John McLaughlin and many more are also featured (Joyride Media)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274424

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 16 Aug 2015

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