Radio New Zealand National. 2015-05-11. 00:00-23:59.

Find out more about this item:
Message us

Rights Information

A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

11 May 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 The Captive Wife, by Fiona Kidman (13 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ); 5:10 War Report (RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:18 Pacific News 6:22 Rural News 6:27 and 8:45 Te Manu Korihi News 6:44 and 7:41 NZ Newspapers 6:47 Business News 7:42 and 8:34 Sports News 6:46 and 7:34 Traffic

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday 11 May 2015
BODY:
Proposed new quake measures could be devastating for small towns and cities; Prominent Wellington property investor questions quake estimates; Govt MPs made huge gains in Auckland property market; John Key responds to pecuniary interests register; Horror weekend on the roads; Stewart Islanders turn it on for the 'down-to-earth' prince; Search for missing Johnsonville woman; Weekend's horror road toll; Missing police dog found safe and well but hungry.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 33'01"

06:07
Sports News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

06:10
Peters suggests Govt housing policy influenced by Nat MPs investing in Auckland.
BODY:
The New Zealand First leader has suggested National MPs with investments in the Auckland property market are influencing the Government's housing policy.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

06:16
Pacific News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'29"

06:24
Morning Rural News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'56"

06:28
Te Manu Korihi News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
A Treaty lawyer says the Crown's approach to recognising Māori water rights is no better than its handling of foreshore and seabed claims; A Taranaki tribe is accusing the Environmental Protection Authority of failing to engage with the region's iwi; Heritage New Zealand says a request by a Motiti Island hapu for the Astrolabe - Otaiti Reef to become a waahi tapu is not on its priority list right now; A kuia says she's changed her mind about the local council in the King Country after it introduced a free driving course for rangatahi.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'31"

06:41
Small towns fear new quake prone legislation will spell their end
BODY:
New Zealand's heritage-rich provincial towns are worried new quake prone legislation could mean the death of their communities.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'28"

06:43
Missing police dog is found in the Tararua Ranges
BODY:
The police dog Thames, which had been missing for a week, will be taken to the vet to be checked out today.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'33"

06:48
Retail trade figures expected to show strong first quarter growth
BODY:
Official retail figures are expected to show that consumers have been on a spending spree over the first three months of the year.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'40"

06:50
Tall and small the future for retirement villages?
BODY:
Smaller, high-rise retirement villages could hit the skyline in the future, in cities such as Auckland.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: retirement villages
Duration: 4'27"

06:55
Fall for wine harvest expected
BODY:
Delegat Group says the New Zealand wine industry is likely to see a fall in the 2015 harvest, based on its own experience.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: wine
Duration: 1'26"

06:58
Jim Parker in Australia
BODY:
Across the Tasman, and Australia's Reserve Bank has been accused of an own goal after last week's interest rate cut triggered a perverse outcome in financial markets.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 1'05"

06:59
Morning Markets for 11 May 2015
BODY:
Wall Street finished last week up after jobs' growth in the US and the unemployment rate dropped to a near seven-year low of 5.4 percent.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 27"

07:06
Sports News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'06"

07:11
Proposed new quake measures could be devastating for small towns and cities
BODY:
Some cities will be granted an extra 20-years to bring their earthquake prone buildings up to scratch.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: earthquakes
Duration: 3'42"

07:16
Prominent Wellington property investor questions quake estimates
BODY:
Listening to that was Wellington-based property investor and member of the Property Council, Ian Cassels.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: earthquakes
Duration: 5'05"

07:20
Govt MPs made huge gains in Auckland property market
BODY:
Government MPs with property investments in Auckland are likely to have made huge gains over the past few years as the price of real estate there has shot up.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'12"

07:24
John Key responds to pecuniary interests register
BODY:
The Prime Minister, John Key says high levels of property investment by MPs should not surprise anyone.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'43"

07:27
Horror weekend on the roads
BODY:
Ten people were killed on the roads this weekend in five separate accidents.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: road toll
Duration: 3'01"

07:29
Stewart Islanders turn it on for the 'down-to-earth' prince
BODY:
Stewart Islanders say they cannot believe their luck at getting Prince Harry to themselves.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'37"

07:35
Search for missing Johnsonville woman
BODY:
The search for 29-year-old Johnsonville woman Susan O'Brien, who went missing while competing in the 20 kilometre Xterra Wellington Trail Running Series event in the Rimutuka forest park yesterday, is continuing this morning.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'17"

07:40
Weekend's horror road toll
BODY:
Ten people were killed in five separate accidents in less than 24 hours, including three women from the same extended family.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: road safety, road toll
Duration: 5'17"

07:45
Missing police dog found safe and well but hungry
BODY:
A single paw print in the mud led to the recovery of missing police dog Thames.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'23"

07:48
British election results illustrate divide
BODY:
The British Conservative Party defied all the pollsters with its victory in the UK election on Friday.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, elections
Duration: 7'57"

07:57
Ministry considers bulk contracts for school property
BODY:
The Education Ministry is considering bundling school maintenance into contracts potentially worth many millions of dollars.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'50"

08:08
Sports News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'58"

08:11
Ten dead in horror weekend road toll
BODY:
The head of road policing wants the speed limit on many rural roads reduced to 70 or 80 kilometres an hour in the wake of a horrendous weekend of road deaths.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: road toll
Duration: 5'55"

08:17
High and low quake risk city mayors discuss new EQ strengthening legislation
BODY:
Some cities could be granted an extra 20 years to bring their earthquake prone buildings up to scratch.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: earthquakes
Duration: 5'08"

08:24
PHD student to release thesis about growing trend of self representation in Court
BODY:
For many, going to court without a lawyer would be unthinkable but a new study shows there's a growing trend of self representation.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'29"

08:31
Markets Update for 11 May 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'02"

08:36
Property investors warn against long term laws for short term housing woes
BODY:
It seems every day there's a new horror headline about Auckland's overheated property market.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 5'41"

08:42
Government defends delay of anchor projects
BODY:
The deadlines for three of Christchurch's so-called anchor projects have been pushed out, sparking calls for the Government to front up over the reasons behind the delays.
Topics: politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags:
Duration: 2'51"

08:47
Te Manu Korihi News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
A Taranaki tribe is accusing the Environmental Protection Authority of failing to engage with the region's iwi; A Treaty lawyer says the Crown's approach to recognising Māori water rights is no better than its handling of foreshore and seabed claims; Heritage New Zealand says a request by a Motiti Island hapu for the Astrolabe - Otaiti Reef to become a waahi tapu is not on its priority list right now; A kuia says she's changed her mind about the local council in the King Country after it introduced a free driving course for rangatahi.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'22"

08:50
Questions over R&D funding going offshore
BODY:
The benefits from millions of dollars of taxpayer-funded research subsidies maybe heading straight overseas.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'33"

08:54
Noted composer Jack Body dies after long battle with cancer
BODY:
That's the theme to Close To Home, one of the more widely known works by the noted composer, Jack Body, who has died in Wellington aged 70.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'46"

08:56
Phil Kafcaloudes with news from Australia
BODY:
Time to chat to our Melbourne correspondent Phil Kafcaloudes.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 3'52"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The Global Gardener, by Michael Scott (1 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:05
Does increasing herd sizes really get farmers any extra money?
BODY:
Dairy NZ scientist John Roche says between 2003 and 2013 the average dairy farmer added 100 cows to their herd - but he says they're no better off financially because they have to spend more on supplementary feed and are damaging the environment in the process.
Topics: farming, environment
Regions:
Tags: dairy, Cows
Duration: 21'26"

09:30
Workers dying on the job in Qatar
BODY:
The International Trade Union federation estimates that 4-thousand workers will die by the time the Fifa World Cup begins in Qatar in 2022. Sharan Burrows, General Secretary International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) said this is a global dispute over fundamental workers' rights and modern day slavery in Qatar which must be resolved immediately. The head of the union, Sharan Burrows is in New Zealand ahead of the under 20 FIFA World Cup, which is being held here from the end of this month to try and pressure FIFA to do more to protect workers in Qatar.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: employment, FIFA World Cup
Duration: 15'59"

09:51
Africa correspondent Deborah Patta
BODY:
The rescue of hundreds of girls in Nigeria who had been kidnapped by Boko Haram and tensions in Burundi.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Africa
Duration: 9'07"

10:10
Australian children's writer Morris Gleitzman
BODY:
Morris Gleitzman is one of Australia's funniest children's authors, but he also tackles some serious and complicated topics including cancer, the holocaust, World War 1. Morris Gleiztman says he loves writing for 8 to 14 year olds who are starting to see the world individually and develop their own moral landscapes.
EXTENDED BODY:
Morris Gleitzman is the multi-award-winning Australian children's writer, author of more than 30 books, many of which have been adapted for film, television and even stage.
He's one of Australia's funniest children's authors (e.g. Give Peas a Chance), but he also tackles serious and complicated topics such as cancer, the holocaust, and war, as in his best selling series Once, Then and Now.
Morris Gleiztman says he loves writing for 8- to 14-year-olds who are “starting to see the world individually and developing their own moral landscapes”.
He talks to Kathryn Ryan about entertaining and challenging his readers, and the beginning of his career, working for the ABC as a writer on the comedy TV series The Norman Gunston show.
Topics: books, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Morris Gleitzman, children's author
Duration: 30'22"

10:35
Book Review: The Soldier's Wife by Pamela Hart
BODY:
The Soldier's Wife by Pamela Hart. Published by Hachette, RRP$34.99. Reviewed by Sonja de Freiz.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'40"

11:05
Politics with Matthew Hooton and Mike Williams
BODY:
The standoff between the government and Auckland council over special housing areas, this weeks budget, and the UK election result.
EXTENDED BODY:
The standoff between the government and Auckland council over special housing areas, this weeks budget, and the UK election result.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK election, budget 2015, Auckland housing market
Duration: 24'43"

11:35
The bounty of Hamilton Gardens
BODY:
Gus Flower, Operations Manager for the Hamilton Gardens, discusses the range of produce grown and harvested each year.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Hamilton gardens
Duration: 12'44"

11:47
Urbanist Tommy Honey
BODY:
Tommy Honey discusses the new National War Memorial Park, Pukeahu, which recently opened in Wellington.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Pukeahu
Duration: 11'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Does increasing herd sizes really get famers any extra money?
Dairy NZ scientist John Roche says between 2003 and 2013 the average dairy farmer added 100 cows to their herd - but he says they're no better off finiancially because they have to spend more on supplementary feed and are damaging the environment in the process. John Roche - Principal scientist at Dairy NZ.
09:30 Workers dying on the job in Qatar
The International Trade Union federation estimates that 4-thousand workers will die by the time the Fifa World Cup begins in Qatar in 2022. Sharan Burrow, General Secretary International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) said this is a global dispute over fundamental workers' rights and modern day slavery in Qatar which must be resolved immediately. The ITUF says they are used as forced labour, denied the right to join a union, live in squalid living conditions and often are not paid the wages they are promised. The head of the union, Sharan Burrows is in New Zealand ahead of the under 20 FIFA World Cup, which is being held here from the end of this month to try and pressure FIFA to do more to protect workers in Qatar.
09:45 Africa correspondent, Debora Patta
Africa correspondent Deborah Patta reports on the rescue of hundreds of girls in Nigeria who had been kidnapped by Boko Haram; and tensions in Burundi.
10:05 Australian children's writer Morris Gleitzman
Morris Gleitzman is the multi-award-winning Australian children's writer, author of more than 30 books. Many of his books have been adapted for film, television and even stage. His career began working for the ABC as a writer on the comedy TV series The Norman Gunston show. He's one of Australia's funniest children's authors, but he also tackles serious and complicated topics such as cancer, the holocaust, and war. Morris Gleiztman says he loves writing for 8- to 14-year-olds who are “starting to see the world individually and developing their own moral landscapes”. He talks to Kathryn Ryan about entertaining and challenging his readers.
10:35 Book review: 'The Soldier's Wife' by Pamela Hart
Published by Hachette. Reviewed by Sonja de Friez.
10:45 The Reading: 'The Global Gardener' by Michael Scott
A Gardening Travelogue that moves from Vegetables in Scotland, to grass in California, and a trans-Tasman garden in Wellington meeting quirky characters along the way. . . told by a botanist who describes himself as having 'a dynamic and romantic relationship with flora and fauna'. Michael Scott was born in New Zealand but lives in Gloucestershire, England where he strives to formulate practical action plans to preserve and revere the natural world. (1 of 10, RNZ)
11:05 Political commentators Matthew Hooton and Mike Williams
Political commentators Matthew Hooton and Mike Williams discuss the standoff between the government and Auckland council over special housing areas , this weeks budget, and the UK election result.
11:30 The bounty of Hamilton Gardens
The award-winning Hamilton Gardens attract around one million visitors each year. Set amongst 54 hectares, the gardens are quite different to the traditional botanical garden model – and include five different garden collections and 21 themed gardens. The council-owned gardens also produce an incredible range of food – honey, eggs, lemon curd, marmalade and kumara. Kathryn Ryan speaks with Gus Flower, Operations Manager for the gardens, who shares growing tips and recipes for lemon curd and marmalade.
Gallery: Hamilton Gardens
Recipes: Sevillle Orange Marmalade and Scrummy Easy Lemon Curd.
11:45 Urbanist Tommy Honey
Tommy Honey discusses the new Pukeahu National War Memorial Park, which recently opened in Wellington.

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
Missing runner in Wellington has been found and the Automobile Association sees no easy answer to road toll.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'38"

12:17
Retail card spending fell sharply in April
BODY:
Retail card spending fell sharply in April, dragged down by a big fall in sales of durables such as furniture and washing machines.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Retail card spending
Duration: 1'44"

12:18
Government deficit stronger than expected
BODY:
The government has posted a smaller-than-expected nine-month deficit but says it still won't achieve a surplus for the year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: government deficit
Duration: 48"

12:19
Kirkcaldie & Stains makes first half net loss
BODY:
Kirkcaldie & Stains has reported a first half net loss of half a million dollars, after a decision to write down a previously unrecognised tax asset.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Kirkcaldie & Stains
Duration: 38"

12:23
Midday markets for 11 May 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Brad Gordon at Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'57"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
The New Zealand sevens coach Sir Gordon Tietjens says he's disappointed his side failed to defend their Glasgow crown, but he's glad they've achieved their main goal in qualifying for next year's Rio Olympics.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'46"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'13"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

Information and debate, people and places around NZ

=AUDIO=

13:07
Your song - Little Darling
BODY:
Nat Watts from Christchurch has chosen 'Little Darling' by The Paper Cranes.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'05"

13:19
New Zealand Retro: Beauty pageants
BODY:
Guests: Caroline Daley, Candace Savage and Anjelique Jones.
EXTENDED BODY:

Left: 1947: Mary Wootton (Miss New Zealand) holding a BOAC (British Overseas Airways Corporation) poster, at Whites Aviation offices, Auckland. Whites Aviation Ltd :Photographs. Ref: WA-10826-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. Right: Miss Pinup New Zealand 2015 Anjelique Jones : Photographer: David Michael Photography.
Beauty pageants: their history, their rise and fall, and their future, with historian Caroline Daley, Canadian author on the history of beauty queens Candace Savage, and Miss Pinup NZ 2015, Anjelique Jones, AKA Bettie Rage.
Gallery: Beauty pageants in New Zealand
Related

In the Eye of the Beholder: Miss Universe NZ
How Miss New Zealand became Miss Anonymous

Topics: life and society, history
Regions:
Tags: Beauty pageants, beauty
Duration: 40'37"

14:08
The Quizmaster and the Prince - Vicki Coats
BODY:
Stewart Island quiz mistress, Vicki Coats, did everything she wasn't supposed to do in the presence of a Royal. But Prince Harry didn't seem to mind. He spent the evening at the South Sea Hotel for the Sunday quiz and Vicki got up close to the Royal.
Topics: life and society
Regions: Southland
Tags: Prince Harry
Duration: 8'46"

14:17
A life after sport - Jacob Oram
BODY:
Sports stars who retire are often faced with a difficult transition - when your career ends in your 30s, and you're a well-known face and name it can be hard to figure out what to do next. Some take up commentary positions, coaching and mentoring roles - but former Black Cap, Jacob Oram is taking a different path. He's graduating today from Massey University with a Bachelor of Business Studies - an achievement that was a long time coming.
Topics: education, sport
Regions:
Tags: Jacob Oram
Duration: 11'09"

14:43
Feature album - Begin To Hope
BODY:
The feature album today, is Begin to Hope, the fourth record by Russian-American singer Regina Spektor.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'16"

15:10
Dead Wake - the other Titanic
BODY:
The sinking of the superliner, Lusitania in May 1915 is considered the "other Titanic" in the history of maritime tragedies. German submarine fired a torpedo into the mighty ship off the coast of Ireland killing close to 1200 people and pushing an outraged United States closer to joining the First World War. Author Erik Larson tells the story of the sinking, and the cover up of the legendary disaster in his book, Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania.
EXTENDED BODY:
One-hundred years ago last week, May 7th 1915, a German U-Boat fired a torpedo into the passenger ship RMS Lusitania off the coast of Ireland killing 1200 of the 2000 people on board. It’s the other Titanic.
Author Erik Larson, known as the master of narrative, historic non-fiction said the Lusitania was special.
“With World War I underway, it was the biggest most glamorous ocean liner in service” he says. “You could book a state room that had a wood burning fire place”.
Larson says other mighty ocean liners of the era were either commandeered into military service or parked in neutral harbors for safe keeping. Not the Lusitania.
“It was considered so big and so fast people assumed or believed no submarine could catch it” Larson says.
His new book 'Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania' tells the story of the doomed ship, the German submarine that hunted her, the dramatic 18-minute sinking, and the 100-year-old controversy about information on the German U-boats lurking in the area that was never passed on to the Lusitania.
On the morning of May 1st, 1915, as passengers were preparing to leave New York city bound for Liverpool, the German Embassy placed an ad in the newspapers “warning anyone sailing across the Atlantic that they did so at their own risk because it was a war zone. In the New York World paper, the notice appeared right next to an advertisement for Cunard. The ad was widely interpreted as a direct warning about the Lusitania, according to Larson.
But the passengers took no notice. They believed a passenger ship would be off limits to German U-Boat attack. Larson says evidence shows that passengers believed they would have protection in the North Altantic.
“It seems clear from passenger accounts that Cunard was telling passengers before the voyage began that they would be under the watchful guard of the Royal Navy as the ship entered the so called war zone."
No Royal Navy escorts were dispatched as the Lusitania approached the Irish Coast on a beautiful spring afternoon on May 7th, 1915.
“The sea was absolutely flat and glassy. At this point, about 2 o’clock, the passengers were congratulating themselves that they had at last made it. They had not been torpedoed, all is good and they’re going to arrive in port the next day” Larson describes.
Many passengers were on deck looking out at the sea when they saw it.
“Suddenly there is a track of a torpedo. It was such an almost miraculous event everyone had feared and dreaded and now here it is. Here’s this thing coming across the glassy sea. They could see the compressed air wake on the surface”.
One torpedo fired by German Captain Walther Schwieger was all it took.
“There is this confluence of chance events that led to the fact that this gigantic ship would sink in 18 minutes because of a single torpedo. No ship engineer would have forecast that was possible” Larson says. But it hit in just the right place causing catastrophic flooding. The Lusitania began to list at 25 degrees.
Because of the Titanic disaster just a few years before, there were plenty of lifeboats on the Lusitania for everyone.
“The problem is when you have a ship leaning at 25 degrees half the lifeboats were useless. How do you get across 8 feet of open space 60 feet above the ocean surface into the lifeboat? “ asks Larson.
Only 6 lifeboats were successfully launched. Most of the survivors simply jumped overboard with their life vests. Larson writes about one passenger, Dwight Harris, who brought his own custom made life belt. In a letter to his Mother, Larson says he detailed the last minutes of the Lusitania.
“He watched this giant ship go by. He could see the whole panorama of death and despair and smoke and everything as the ship past and sank” says Larson.
Conspiracy theories about the sinking of the Lusitania have swirled around for 100 years. Questions remain about what British Naval intelligence knew, and why the information was never shared with the Captain of the Lusitania. In the book, Larson describes an ultra secret agency called Room 40 which had been decoding German U-boat messages since the start of the war.
“Room 40 knew exactly where it was headed which was a patrol zone just off the coast of Liverpool and that was where the Lusitania was going” Larson reveals. The Captain was never told. They also knew the U20 had torpedoed 3 much smaller vessels in the vicinity.
So a question remains: why wasn’t the Lusitania warned about the U-Boat. There is speculation that Winston Churchill or someone in the Admiralty was involved.
“Whoever engineered this wanted the Lusitiania to be attacked as a way of getting America to join the war” says Larson. “Whether that had anything to do with why the Lusitania was left unprotected and was given so little information, I will leave that to the conspiracy theorists”.
Follow Afternoons on Twitter @AfternoonsRNZ
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'40"

15:30
Millennial poets inspire
BODY:
Ya-Wen Ho and Liang Yujing are two talented millennial poets who make bilingualism look easy. Internationally published they're performing their work in English and Chinese, shuttling between languages and cultures. Lynda attends their public performance in the 2015 Autumn Poetry Reading at the Wellington City Library to learn more.
EXTENDED BODY:

Renee Liang (Poet Playwright), Liang Yujing (Featured Poet), Wen Powles (Confucius Institute), Ho Yawen (Featured Poet)
My mother has had the same Taiwanese mobile number for three years but I still don't know it. Not by heart, anyway.
I know my father's number though ... I falter to recite it in English, I have to write it down.
I have dialed this number every night for ten years, to talk to my father, in a different time zone, in his office ...

– Untitled, excerpt from a poem by Ho Ya-Wen
"A satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit..."
Ho Ya-Wen's poem about her one daily phone call to her father in Taiwan exemplifies the extreme separation and sometimes isolation that is commonly experienced many new Asian immigrant families when they live and work in different countries. They are separated geographically by thousands of miles and described as "satellite families". In nearly all cases, the men will work in the Asian regions while the women and children will live totally separate lives, in Ya-Wen's case it was in a suburb of Auckland.
It's a cold night and well past the bedtime of the children of Li Haibo’s Chinese school as they faithfully sing poems about Autumn, converted into songs.
The Chinese community are celebrating the autumnal season with a language and heritage evening event at the Wellington City Library titled Autumn Poetry Reading. Chinese and English poetry is being performed by some of our country’s finest bilingual talents.

The youngest generation of poets from Li Haibo s Chinese School
These Chinese themed poetry readings are jointly organised by the Wellington City Library and the Confucius Institute at Victoria university of Wellington. Each contributor performs their work in English and Chinese, shuttling between languages and cultures.
Chairing a discussion with the two featured poets, poet and playwright Renee Liang is among the best of our Asian New Zealand talent contributing to this event that traverses languages and cultures. A famous translated poem by Rewi Alley is also performed in Mandarin.
But its the voices of the two featured writers, Ho Ya-Wen and Liang Yujing, touted as "Millennials who make bilingualism look easy" that the public are keen to hear.

Featured Poets Liang Yujing and Ho Yawen at the Confucius Institute, Victoria University
The next day at the Confucius Institute at Victoria University I meet both writers to hear what makes them tick and to explore subjects such as immortal poets of drunkenness and wine and growing up as satellite families:
"Poet, artist and zine innovator" Ya-Wen tells me she published her first volume of poetry with the international publishing house Tinfish Press in Hawaii, 2013. Ya-Wen tells me that she loves typography and it's relationship to writing. At first I think Ya-Wen says "topography of writing" and imagine words as if they were "maps" across the page.
Ya-Wen was born in Taipei in 1987, immigrating to this country at the age of six. She grew up in Buckland's Beach and considers herself a JAFFA (Just Another F**ken Aucklander).
Attending Elam Fine Arts School at Auckland University and currently working as a graphic artist in Auckland – her subject matter is deeply informed by her experiences as a child growing up in a satellite family. Ya-Wen's father worked in Asia for over a decade while she and her brother were bought up by their mother in Auckland.
Ya-Wen is most recently a recipient of Eleanor Catton’s Horoeka/Lancewood reading grant.
"So what are zines?"
"Zines are an independent form of publishing where you really take control of your medium and content and you circulate outside of main distribution channels."
"Typography and language?"
"For example claustrophobia and density can be expressed through how a page looks; if all your text is huddled to look scared, it can be powerful way to express poetry."
"Satellite family experience?"
"For a whole decade my father worked and lived in Taiwan and we would talk on the phone, every night."
I consider how this would have impacted her family, especially after her father's death from illness, "Was it hard for you parents?"
"Yeah - this was in the mid 1990's when Skype wasn't around and phone bills really added up"
And now her mother does the "Persephone thing", spending six months a year living in Taiwan away from her children. It follows that topography, typography and living satellite lives would reverberate through Ya-Wen's poetry.
A poet with a very different, visceral voice is Liang Yujing. Yujing came from China recently to pursue a PhD critiquing contemporary Chinese poetry at Victoria University. His poems and translations have appeared in many prestigious international publications including the Salzburg Review, Boston Review, Asia Literary Review, and Poetry NZ.

Wen Powels, Director of the Confucius Institute
Yujing was born in 1982 in the small town Changde in Hunan Province, central China. His father was the Professor of Literature at Hunan University of Arts and Science and an early influence, alongside Tang Dynasty "Poet Immortal" Le Bai. Yujing explains:
I grew up learning the classics, especially the work of Tang Dynasty poet immortal Li Bai, the poet of drunkenness and wine. He famously wrote over a thousand poems about drinking wine and only several poems about missing wine.
A quick search reveals that:
Li Bai (705 – 762), also known as Li Po, was a Chinese poet acclaimed from his own day to the present as a genius and romantic figure who took traditional poetic forms to new heights ... often called the "Golden Age of China" – the poet of wine and drunkenness.
Yujing's poetry is ironic, dark and moody in tone, exploring a harsher reality of contemporary life in China. An innocent visit to the fish markets can result in an unsettling poem filled with subtle violence, as seen through the eyes of a child:
Wet Market
In the dim light of evening, the wet market swims into vision
in a blur of colours: a string of electric lights, glowing yellow;
the pale white of a small concrete path,
a ditch in shadow, dark as the eyes of my people.
Women of every age swim through the air
in clothes bright as fish scales
moving from one stall to another,
hands like fins in the vegetable piles, picking and choosing.
At the side of the road, a man, stripped to the waist,
is ripping swamp eels open with practised hands.
He nails each eel alive to the bench
and tears out the backbones.
Blood courses down the grain of the wooden bench,
towards the ground. A small boy stands and stares,
fascinated by this show - it's like magic!
he watches till his eyes turn red, red as blood.
– by Liang Yujing, translated from the Chinese by Miriam Lo
Topics: arts, life and society, music
Regions: Wellington Region, Auckland Region
Tags: poetry, spiritual practices, cultural practice, Tang Dynasty, China
Duration: 21'26"

15:46
The Panel pre-show for 11 May 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Your Song
Little Darling by The Paper Cranes chosen by Nat Watts
1:20 New Zealand Retro: Beauty pageants
Guests:
Caroline Daley
Candace Savage
Anjelique Jones
Gallery: Beauty pageants in New Zealand

Left: 1947: Mary Wootton (Miss New Zealand) holding a BOAC (British Overseas Airways Corporation) poster, at Whites Aviation offices, Auckland. Whites Aviation Ltd :Photographs. Ref: WA-10826-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. Right: Miss Pinup New Zealand 2015 Anjelique Jones : Photographer: David Michael Photography.
Archival audio supplied by Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.
2:10 The Quizmaster and the Prince - Vicki Coats
Stewart Island quiz mistress, Vicki Coats, did everything she wasn't supposed to do in the presence of a Royal. But Prince Harry didn't seem to mind. He spent the evening at the South Sea Hotel for the Sunday quiz and Vicki got up close to the Royal.

2:20 A life after sport - Jacob Oram
Sports stars who retire are often faced with a difficult transition - when your career ends in your 30s, and you're a well-known face and name it can be hard to figure out what to do next. Some take up commentary positions, coaching and mentoring roles - but former Black Cap, Jacob Oram is taking a different path. He's graduating today from Massey University with a Bachelor of Business Studies - an achievement that was a long time coming.
2:30 NZ Reading - The Conductor
Shostakovich has been turned down for the army and shares his disappointment over a drink with Sollertinsky, Artistic Director of the Leningrad Philharmonic
2:45 Feature album
Begin To Hope. Regina Spektor
3:10 Dead Wake
The sinking of the superliner, Lusitania in May 1915 is considered the "other Titanic" in the history of maritime tragedies.
A German submarine fired a torpedo into the mighty ship off the coast of Ireland killing close to 1200 people and pushing an outraged United States closer to joining the First World War.
Author Erik Larson tells the story of the sinking, and the cover up of the legendary disaster in his book, Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania.

See also, the National Library' blog about the Lusitania.
3:30 Voices - Lynda Chanwai-Earle
Lynda Chanwai-Earle brings us two talented Asian writers who have been nicknamed "Millennium poets" for their bilingual dexterity. She attends their public performance in Wellington to learn more
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about. With Jim Mora, Noelle McCarthy, Jane Clifton and Neil Miller

MUSIC DETAILS
MONDAY MAY 11
YOUR SONG:
ARTIST: Paper Cranes
TITLE: Little Darling
COMP: Brown,Brown
ALBUM: The Road Home
LABEL: PRIVATE 3049
FEATURE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Regina Spektor
TITLE: Fidelity
COMP: Spektor
ALBUM: Begin To Hope
LABEL: SIRE
ARTIST: Regina Spektor
TITLE: Better
COMP: Spektor
ALBUM: Begin To Hope
LABEL: SIRE
ARTIST: Regina Spektor
TITLE: On The Radio
COMP: Spektor
ALBUM: Begin To Hope
LABEL: SIRE
ARTIST: Regina Spektor
TITLE: Hotel Song
COMP: Spektor
ALBUM: Begin To Hope
LABEL: SIRE
THE PANEL:
ARTIST: Vance Joy
TITLE: Riptide
COMP: Vance Joy
ALBUM: God Loves You When You're Dancing
LABEL: LIBERATION 401850

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:46
The Panel pre-show for 11 May 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'59"

16:06
The Panel with Jane Clifton and Neil Miller (Part 1)
BODY:
A horrendous road toll at the weekend has reignited discussions about speed. We talk to motorsport legend and road safety campaigner Greg Murphy about whether demerit points and lowering the speed limit will make any difference. Some Dunedin residents are at their wits end after continuous rowdy and destructive partying by some of the student population. Resident Carol Devine talks to the Panel about being harrassed for complaining. Massey University bans smart watches in exams over cheating fears.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'35"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Jane Clifton and Neil Miller have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'33"

16:11
Speed and the road toll
BODY:
A horrendous road toll at the weekend has reignited discussions about speed. We talk to motorsport legend and road safety campaigner Greg Murphy about whether demerit points and lowering the speed limit will make any difference.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: road toll
Duration: 12'03"

16:23
Dunedin party central
BODY:
Some Dunedin residents are at their wits end after continuous rowdy and destructive partying by some of the student population. Resident Carol Devine talks to the Panel about being harrassed for complaining.
Topics: education
Regions: Otago
Tags: partying
Duration: 8'51"

16:31
Smart watch ban in exams
BODY:
Massey University bans smart watches in exams over cheating fears.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: watches, Massey University
Duration: 47"

16:34
The Panel with Jane Clifton and Neil Miller (Part 2)
BODY:
How old are we when we stop keeping up with the latest music? What the Panelists Jane Clifton and Neil Miller have been thinking about. Scores for junior football games will not be made public, in order to take the focus off winning. We talk to former All White Steve Sumner about winning. TVNZ wants to cut back on its election coverage and in the UK the boffins are scratching their heads of their election result.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'43"

16:35
Are you still on top of the pops?
BODY:
How old are we when we stop keeping up with the latest music?
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'55"

16:40
Panel says
BODY:
What the Panelists Jane Clifton and Neil Miller have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'37"

16:47
Junior football not about winning
BODY:
Scores for junior football games will not be made public, in order to take the focus off winning. We talk to former All White Steve Sumner about winning.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: junior football
Duration: 8'05"

16:55
Elections
BODY:
TVNZ wants to cut back on its election coverage and in the UK the boffins are scratching their heads of their election result.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: TVNZ, UK elections
Duration: 4'46"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Monday 11 May 2015
BODY:
A pawnshop murder accused believed God told him to kill two men. The Government signals half a billion dollars of ACC levy cuts and the lost mother who was sustained in the bush by prayer and breastmilk.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'17"

17:07
Murder accused believed God told him to kill men
BODY:
A man accused of murder believed God was demanding him to destroy two men he's admitted stabbing to death at a south Auckland pawn shop.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Paul Fanning, Paul Matthews
Duration: 3'27"

17:10
ACC levy cuts of half a billion dollars
BODY:
ACC levy cuts of half a billion dollars to be outlined in next week's Budget could see the average motor vechicle levy fall by about a third of what it is now.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: ACC levy cuts
Duration: 6'00"

17:17
Prayer and breastmilk keep mother going
BODY:
Prayer, breastmilk, and thoughts of her family, that's what helped a Wellington runner get through an overnight ordeal spent lost in the bush.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: X terra Race
Duration: 2'57"

17:20
Melbourne teen denied bail
BODY:
An Australian teenager, who was arrested after three bombs were found at his home, has been denied bail in a Melbourne court today.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, teenager, bombs
Duration: 5'08"

17:26
Two hunters die in accidents
BODY:
Two young hunters are dead in separate shooting accidents.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: shooting accidents
Duration: 2'31"

17:28
Prince Harry passes a royal grilling at Stewart Island school
BODY:
Prince Harry has been given a royal grilling by the pupils of Stewart Island's only school.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Prince Harry, Royal visit
Duration: 2'53"

17:35
Today's market update
BODY:
The New Zealand dollar has seen some volatility since Friday, after fresh economic data increased the likelihood of an interest rate hike in the United States, while the Reserve Bank here is expected to cut the official cash rate over the next few months.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'41"

17:38
Clinic failed to tell man he had skin cancer
BODY:
A man who had skin cancer was not told for 15 months, and only found out because of a chance visit to his GP.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: skin cancer, Anthony Hill
Duration: 4'37"

17:43
Horror highway proof lower speed limits work - police
BODY:
Bay of Plenty police are arguing their so-called horror highway proves that lower speed limits cut down on crashes.
Topics: transport
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: road crashes
Duration: 4'05"

17:46
Small deficit will be forecast in next week's Budget
BODY:
As he prepares to deliver his 7th Budget next week, the Finance Minister has confirmed a deficit will be forecast.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget, Bill English
Duration: 2'58"

17:49
High fares for Aucklanders paying cash
BODY:
Aucklanders paying cash on public transport will soon be hit with higher fares.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: public transport, fares
Duration: 3'54"

17:53
Defensive driving courses could save more rangatahi's lives
BODY:
A driving instructor is urging parents and caregivers to pay for their rangatahi to do defensive driving courses saying it could save their lives.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags: defensive driving courses
Duration: 3'28"

17:57
Oamaru expects to lose heritage buildings
BODY:
Oamaru still expects to still some heritage whitestone buildings under the new change to earthquake rules, but most of those will be of lesser importance.
Topics: environment, history
Regions: Otago
Tags: whitestone buildings
Duration: 2'41"

18:06
Sports News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'26"

18:11
ACC levy cuts to be outlined in next week's Budget
BODY:
ACC levy cuts to be outlined in next week's Budget could see the average motor vehicle levy fall by about a third of what it is now.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: ACC levy cuts
Duration: 6'36"

18:17
Jealous rage behind double murder, says Crown
BODY:
Zarn Tarapata has admitted stabbing the two to death, but his lawyer argues he's not guilty, because he was suffering a psychotic episode due to schizophrenia.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Zarn Tarapata, Paul Fanning, Paul Matthews
Duration: 3'14"

18:21
Judge rules in teacher pornography case
BODY:
An Auckland teacher has been found to have been masturbating in a classroom during school hours.
Topics: crime, education
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: masturbating, teacher
Duration: 2'13"

18:24
Islamic State appears to have sights set on Canberra
BODY:
In Australia, Islamic State appears to have turned it's sights on Canberra as the police crack down on suspected plots in Melbourne.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Islamic State, Australia
Duration: 2'07"

18:25
Coles supermarket refunds millions to suppliers
BODY:
An Australian supermarket has handed over ten million dollars as settlement for the way it treated its suppliers, including farmers and food processors.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Coles Settlement
Duration: 4'56"

18:35
New house price index shows much smaller rises
BODY:
A new way of calculating house price rises shows them going up much less than had been thought.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: house prices
Duration: 5'11"

18:44
Restriction on foreign media dropped in West Papua
BODY:
The President of Indonesia has announced foreign media will no longer be subjected to decades old restrictions on gaining access to the province of Papua where an independence movement has been brutally suppressed.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Indonesia, Papua
Duration: 4'11"

18:53
Te Manu Korihi News for 11 May 2015
BODY:
A driving instructor says more rangatahi lives could be saved if parents and caregivers pay for them to do defensive driving courses. An Otago University study published earlier this year found that few Māori are taking part in them; The leader of Ngai Tahu says it was an immense privilege to welcome Prince Harry to Invercargill during his first visit to Murihiku/Southland; Mourners farewelling prominent Ngapuhi and Ngati Hine leader Erima Henare in Northland were a 'whose who' of Maoridom. Education Minister Hekia Parata, who had known Mr Henare for years, says he had a great talent for helping people move past confrontation and conflict to find common ground.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:30 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:12
Kicking for Goals : Sene Naoupu
BODY:
Oamaru born and bred Samoan, Sene Naoupu on fitness and happiness, and still speaking Samoan even though she's now playing for the Ireland women's rugby team.
Topics: life and society, sport
Regions:
Tags: Ireland, women's rugby
Duration: 19'14"

20:40
Food Technology : Professor Don Otter
BODY:
What it takes to make what we eat and all you ever wanted to know about what makes popcorn pop.
EXTENDED BODY:
What it takes to make what we eat and all you ever wanted to know about what makes popcorn pop.

Topics: food, science, environment, farming, health, technology
Regions:
Tags: food science, food technology, popcorn
Duration: 15'58"

20:59
Nights Conundrum
BODY:
Clue 1
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16"

21:12
Drilling Deep : Dr Alan Baxter
BODY:
University of New England Earth Science researcher Dr Alan Baxter was on board a sea expedition to the Bay of Bengal earlier this year to recover a geological core revealing information on the formation and climate of the Himalayan Mountains during the last 55 million years.
EXTENDED BODY:

University of New England Earth Science researcher Dr Alan Baxter was on board a sea expedition to the Bay of Bengal earlier this year to recover a geological core revealing information on the formation and climate of the Himalayan Mountains during the last 55 million years.
Gallery: Drilling deep
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: geology, geoscience, Bay of Bengal, Himalayan Mountains
Duration: 20'44"

21:59
Nights Conundrum
BODY:
Audio clue 2
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 06"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:15 Kicking for Goals
Oamaru-born and bred Samoan Sene Naoupu on fitness (and happiness), and still speaking Samoan even though she's now playing in Ireland's women's rugby team.
8:10 Windows on the World
International public radio documentaries - visit the Windows on the World web page to find links to these documentaries.
8:40 Food Technology
What it takes to make what we eat. With honorary associate Prof. Don Otter from University of Auckland's School of Chemical Sciences. Why does popcorn pop?
9:10 Drilling Deep
University of New England Earth Science researcher Dr Alan Baxter was on board a sea expedition to the Bay of Bengal earlier this year to recover a geological core revealing information on the formation and climate of the Himalayan Mountains during the last 55 million years.
Gallery: Drilling deep
9:30 Insight
10:00 Late Edition
A review of the news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 Blues Unlimited
Exploring the wonderful world of the Blues and its history, heritage and rich cultural traditions with host "Sleepy Boy Hawkins" (1 of 12, PRX)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring the wonderful world of the Blues and its history, heritage and rich cultural traditions with host "Sleepy Boy Hawkins" (1 of 12, PRX)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274327

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 11 May 2015

We use cookies to help us understand how you use our site, and make your experience better. To find out more read our privacy policy.

Whakamahia ai mātou ngā pihikete ki te rapu māramatanga ki te āhua o tō whakamahi i tēnei paetukutuku, ki te whakapai hoki i tō whai wāhi mai. Ki te rapu kōrero anō pānuitia te kaupapahere tūmataiti.

Accept