Radio New Zealand National. 2015-10-26. 00:00-23:59, [Labour Day].

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

26 October 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 The Book of Job, by Elisabeth Easther (1 of 5, RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ); 5:10 War Report (RNZ); 5:40 Moved to Work: An immigrant herself, Lize Immelman wonders why refugees have such a hard time finding work. She talks to three residents in Newtown about their experiences, and to MP Annette King, Andrew Lockhart from Immigration NZ and academic Gradon Diprose about why work is so important to our lives

===6:00 AM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

An early miscellany of music, stories and random thoughts

===7:35 AM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===8:10 AM. | Labour Day===
=DESCRIPTION=

Colin Peacock talks to some people happy in their work - and asks what will we do when robots are doing it all for us? He picks out some long reads from the media (for those like him too busy or lazy to read whole books) and chats with an Irish rugby commentator with an alter-ego specifically for winding up the Welsh. A Kiwi tastemaker in Australia picks out some new music and a British music fan tells him about digging up lost songs

=AUDIO=

08:15
Gerd Leonhard - technological unemployment
BODY:
Swiss futurist who is among many experts warning that machines are taking over our jobs.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: unemployment
Duration: 17'36"

08:30
Dave Lee - the tech capital of the world
BODY:
The BBC's North America Technology correspondent who has a grandstand view of the hot bed of innovation that is Silicon Valley.
EXTENDED BODY:
The BBC's North America Technology correspondent Dave Lee has a grandstand view of the hot bed of innovation that is Silicon Valley.
But he says it's not all its cracked up to be.
"A review of Silicon Valley from the outside, is one of relentless optimism - that very American [idea] everything is possible, you know the skies the limit.
"But actually when you talk to the people who are working hard every day, it's no coincidence that success happens here."
He was lucky enough to have a a ride in one of Google's driverless cars, which he describes as "brilliant, but boring."
"It plays by the rules so much, you find yourself in the backseat thing 'oh get on with it.'"
He also tells Colin Peacock about how virtual reality is terrifying - dangerous, even.
Topics: technology, media, business
Regions:
Tags: Dave Lee, Labour Day, Google, driverless cars, Tesla, virtual reality games, BBC, employment
Duration: 24'45"

08:50
David Cross - The Social Pantry
BODY:
Food sharing social media site set up in Wellington which is taking off around the country.
Topics: food, life and society, inequality
Regions:
Tags: David Cross, Social Pantry, Facebook, Labour Day
Duration: 7'44"

09:07
Dr Alun Withey - History of the Beard
BODY:
Expert in modern medical history undertaking the first major academic study of facial hair.
EXTENDED BODY:
An expert in modern medical history, Exeter University's Dr Alun Withey is undertaking the first major academic study of facial hair.
He lifts the lid on the hidden history of shaving, theories about facial hair and masculinity, and the days when your barber doubled as your surgeon.
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Dr Alun Withey, Exeter University, Wellcome Trust, shaving, beards
Duration: 19'26"

09:25
Naomi Arnold's Good Reads
BODY:
Naomi Arnold is a Nelson-based freelance writer. At Featured.org.nz she collates outstanding feature articles from New Zealand and around the world and sends them out in a handy weekly email. We asked her to pick her favourite long reads for a long weekend by local journalists.
EXTENDED BODY:
Naomi Arnold is a Nelson-based freelance writer. At Featured.org.nz she collates outstanding feature articles from New Zealand and around the world and sends them out in a handy weekly email. We asked her to pick her favourite long reads for a long weekend by local journalists.
Here are Naomi’s picks:
Charlie Anderson, Lost in the long white cloud: the first true New Zealand feature in to fully use a multi-media format and which could reasonably be called a 'digital longform piece'.
Duncan Greive: Lorde, for Metro. This was such a great get. As well as the writing and the getting of it, he also sold it to Faster/Louder, an Australian publication which produced a great digital rendering of it.
Alistair Bone: Turangi tourist attack, Cracking it on welfare in Huntly, Storm Clouds over Kawhia. Alistair was the Waikato Times’ 'colour writer'. He has reported stories with flair where others would have done a boring old report.
Steve Braunias: Impossible to choose one. The Killings at Stilwell Rd, On my Way to the Border, Trouble in Mosgiel are just some of my favourites. He really is a godfather of good feature writing in New Zealand.
Beck Eleven: A life in beds, An unfortunate Chch son, the insidious creep of abuse. Beck has such a knack for spotting the humanity in people.
Anna Pearson is a former Press reporter who is freelancing now. As well as being a good feature writer she takes her own award-winning photographs and creates her own multimedia pieces - including a cooperative effort on a West Coast skateboarder, an audio slideshow for the BBC about a photographer and a plain old audio piece too for Monocle.
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: Naomi Arnold, Featured, Charlie Anderson, Duncan Greive, Lorde, Alistair Bone, Steve Braunias, Beck Eleven, Anna Pearson, Labour Day
Duration: 34'06"

10:10
Alex Hazlehurst - what happened next?
BODY:
"I'm talented. I'm hard-working. I'm blonde. So why can't I find a job in London?" Expat would-be broadcaster Alex Hazlehurst went public in August about not being able to find a media job there. She was slammed for naivety and a sense of entitlement. But what came after the backlash?
EXTENDED BODY:
"I'm talented. I'm hard-working. I'm blonde. So why can't I find a job in London?" Expat would-be broadcaster Alex Hazlehurst went public in August about not being able to find a media job there. She was slammed for naivety and a sense of entitlement. But what came after the backlash?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'08"

10:20
Laura McQuillan - In Rio
BODY:
New Zealand journalist freelancing in Brazil, which is gearing up for the Olympics.
Topics: media, sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, Rio, Labour Day, Laura McQuillan, The Girl from Ipanema
Duration: 7'56"

10:30
Walter Brasch - The Unknown Holiday
BODY:
American writer Walter Brasch on how Labor Day in the US is just another day off, its meaning lost in the past.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Labour Day, Walter Brasch, employment, Labor Day
Duration: 11'45"

10:48
Magic with David Merry
BODY:
Top Canadian magician and comedian in New Zealand for the Wellington Magic Convention.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: magic, comedy, Canada
Duration: 10'47"

11:10
New Music with Ollie Wards
BODY:
New music for a day off your labours with Australian music station Triple-J's content director. The expat Kiwi DJ Ollie Wards and host Colin Peacock bring us tracks from A$AP Rocky, Jamie XX, Leisure, Ngaiire and more.

EXTENDED BODY:
The Kiwi content director of Australia's cutting-edge music station Triple J presents new music making a mark across the ditch and around the world, including A$AP Rocky, Jamie XX, Leisure, Ngaiire and more.
Artist: Leisure, Got It Bad
Track: Got It Bad
Composers:
Album: single
Label:

Artist: A$AP Rocky - Everyday
Track: Everyday
Composers: A$AP Rocky, Emile Haynie, Frans Mernick, Hudson Mohawke,Jeff Bhasker, Mark Ronson & Tom Elmhirst
Album: At.Long.Last
Label: RCA

Artist: Meg Mac
Track: Never Be
Composers: McInerney
Album: single
Label: Littlebigman Records

Artist: Jamie XX
Track: Loud Places
Composers: Smith / Madley Croft
Album: In Colour
Label: Young Turks

Artist: Ngaiire
Track: Once
Composers: Ngaire Joseph/Gaga Digi
Album: single
Label: Paul Mac
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Ollie Wards, Labour Day, Australia, Labor Day, Triple-J, JJJ
Duration: 49'13"

20:00
The Shape of the Media
BODY:
A panel discussion about the media now and in the future.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jim Mora anchors a panel discussion with Fran O’Sullivan from the NZ Herald, Duncan Greive from The Spinoff, and Associate Professor Darrin Hodgetts from Massey University and international expert Professor Graeme Turner to discuss the the media.
During the conversation, which includes an opening statement from Prof Turner, they tackle a whole range of questions. In an era when traditional media is changing rapidly, what’s the future for quality journalism? What alternatives can online media offer audiences? How is it paid for? What’s the effect of social media and celebrity culture? What are the implications for New Zealanders who can now get access to instant information wherever they are?
The wide-ranging talk takes in developments at the NZ Herald and NZME, as well as the burgeoning website devoted to quality local writing, The Spinoff. The relationship between the exercise of power and the conduct of the media is explored, along with the effects of celebrity culture. Debate is brisk at times, but there is also a considerable amount of agreement about the trends which have developed so far in a rapidly-changing media landscape.
This panel discussion was recorded in front of an audience at the Auckland Art Gallery on 23 October 2015, and staged in association with Massey University.
Topics: author interview, business, history, internet, media
Regions:
Tags: mass media, social media, NZME, NZ Herald, Facebook, Twitter, Psychologists against austerity, Rupert Murdoch, Mike Hosking, The Australian, quality journalism, Opinion, hate speech, celebrity, mass culture, monetising, Johnny Depp’s dogs, hyperbole, Helen Clark, John Key, campaigning, choice, power, democracy, audience, optimism
Duration: 52'21"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:51257:half]
08:13 Gerd Leonhard - technological unemployment
Swiss futurist Gerd Leonhard is among many experts warning that machines are taking over our jobs. But he says it's happening far faster than most people say. How does he know? How will we get wages without work? What will a world of mass-redundancy be like?
08:34 Dave Lee - the tech capital of the world
The BBC's North America Technology correspondent Dave Lee has a grandstand view of the hot bed of innovation that is Silicon Valley. But it's not all its cracked up to be. Those new driverless cars are brilliant but boring, he says. And virtual reality is terrifying - dangerous, even.
08:50 The Social Pantry
What do you do if you have more food than you need? Or, for that matter if you don't have enough? David Cross on the food sharing social media site he set up in Wellington which is taking off around the country.
0907 History of the Beard
Expert in modern medical history, Exeter University's Dr Alun Withey is undertaking the first major academic study of facial hair. He lifts the lid on the hidden history of shaving, theories about facial hair and masculinity, and the days when your barber doubled as your surgeon.
[image:51304:full]
09:22 Naomi Arnold's Good Reads
[image:51235:full]
Naomi Arnold is a Nelson-based freelance writer. At Featured.org.nz she collates outstanding feature articles from New Zealand and around the world and sends them out in a handy weekly email. We asked her to pick her favourite long reads for a long weekend by local journalists.
Here are Naomi’s picks:
Charlie Anderson, Lost in the long white cloud: the first true New Zealand feature in to fully use a multi-media format and which could reasonably be called a 'digital longform piece'.
Duncan Greive Lorde, for Metro. This was such a great get. As well as the writing and the getting of it, he also sold it to Faster/Louder, an Australian publication which produced a great digital rendering of it.
Alistair Bone - Turangi tourist attack, Cracking it on welfare in Huntly, Storm Clouds over Kawhia. Alistair was the Waikato Times’ 'colour writer'. He has reported stories with flair where others would have done a boring old report.
Steve Braunias. Impossible to choose one. The Killings at Stilwell Rd, On my Way to the Border, Trouble in Mosgiel are just some of my favourites. He really is a godfather of good feature writing in New Zealand.
Beck Eleven. A life in beds, An unfortunate Chch son, the insidious creep of abuse. Beck has such a knack for spotting the humanity in people.
Anna Pearson is a former Press reporter who is freelancing now. As well as being a good feature writer she takes her own award-winning photographs and creates her own multimedia pieces - including a cooperative effort on a West Coast skateboarder, an audio slideshow for the BBC about a photographer and a plain old audio piece too for Monocle.
[image:51436:third] no metadata
10:10 Alex Hazlehurst - what happened next?
"I'm talented. I'm hard-working. I'm blonde. So why can't I find a job in London?"
Expat would-be broadcaster Alex Hazlehurst went public in August about not being able to find a media job there. She was slammed for naivety and a sense of entitlement. But what came after the backlash?
10:20 Laura McQuillan - In Rio
[image:51290:full]
New Zealand journalist Laura McQuillan is freelancing in Brazil, which is gearing up for the Olympics.
She is still struggling with dress codes - and getting misty-eyed over a classic Brazilian tune in Te Reo.
[embed] https://www.facebook.com/nzmaci/videos/860623580724457/
10:30 Walter Brasch - The Unknown Holiday?
American writer Walter Brasch says Labor Day in the US has become just another day off for most, its meaning lost in the past. But it has a rich history that shouldn't be buried.
[image:51448:third]
10:45 Magic with David Merry
Billed as Canada's top comedy magician, David Merry is in New Zealand for the Wellington Magic Convention. He's written gags for Rodney Dangerfield, Jay Leno and Joan Rivers, and he teaches comedy to university students. So how do you teach comedy?
11:00 Ollie Wards - new music for a day off
[image:51328:third]
The Kiwi content director of Australia's cutting-edge music station Triple J joins us fron Sydney with new music making a mark across the ditch and around the world.
Playlist before 11am
Artist: Hilltop Hoods
Track: Cosby Sweater
Composers: Lambert/Smith
Album: Walking Under Stars
Label: Universal Music Australia

Artist: Iron and Wine
Track: This must be the place
Composers: Byrne
Album: Sing into My Mouth
Label: Black Cricket

Artist: Prince Buster aka Cecil Campbell
Track: Madness
Composers: Campbell
Album: I feel the Spirit
Label: Jetstar

Artist: The Clash
Track: Guns of Brixton
Composers: Simonon
Album: Sandinista
Label: Epic

Artist: Tami Neilson
Track: Loco Mama
Composers: Neilson
Album: Don't be Afraid
Label: Neilson

Artist: Cayucas
Track: Dancing at the Blue Lagoon
Composers: Yudin/Yudin
Album: Dancing at the Blue Lagoon
Label: Secretly Canadian

Artist: Python Lee Jackson
Track: In a broken Dream
Composers: Python Lee Jackson & Rod Stewart
Album: Super Hits Of The '70s Have A Nice Day: Vol. 8
Label: Rhino

Ollie Wards' Playlist

Artist: Leisure, Got It Bad
Track: Got It Bad
Composers:
Album: single
Label:

Artist: A$AP Rocky - Everyday
Track: Everyday
Composers: A$AP Rocky, Emile Haynie, Frans Mernick, Hudson Mohawke,Jeff Bhasker, Mark Ronson & Tom Elmhirst
Album: At.Long.Last
Label: RCA

Artist: Meg Mac
Track: Never Be
Composers: McInerney
Album: single
Label: Littlebigman Records

Artist: Jamie XX
Track: Loud Places
Composers: Smith / Madley Croft
Album: In Colour
Label: Young Turks

Artist: Ngaiire
Track: Once
Composers: Ngaire Joseph/Gaga Digi
Album: single
Label: Paul Mac (?)

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===12:12 PM. | Matinee Idle===
=DESCRIPTION=

Phil O'Brien and Simon Morris present an afternoon of alleged music and dubious entertainment

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:12 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

After three months Peter Taylor managed to secure an interview with Edward Snowden, the US national security whistle blower. He was eventually told to send an SMS with the number of his Moscow hotel room and wait for a knock on the door. The knock, to his relief, came on time. Snowden was offered asylum in Russia two years ago. He says he has been in negotiation with the American authorities and is prepared to go to jail, but expresses no regret for revealing to journalists details of extensive internet and phone surveillance by American intelligence and their British counterparts. He denies that he is a traitor and asks who has caused more damage – himself or those conducting what he says were unlawful programs. The US Justice Department has filed criminal charges against Snowden, accusing him of espionage and theft of government property.
See the BBC Website for this programme

===5:45 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

From the short story collection 'The Families' (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Smart Talk at the Auckland Museum===
=DESCRIPTION=

A panel discussion from the Auckland Museum chaired by the famous comedian Te Radar features the social entrepreneur Kiritapu Allan, Professor Paul Spoonley from Massey University, the fibre artist Suzanne Tamaki, and Leilani Tamu, a poet, social commentator and Pacific historian. Together they are exploring fresh perspectives on the Treaty of Waitangi

=AUDIO=

18:06
Smart Talk at the Auckland Museum: The Treaty of Waitangi
BODY:
A panel discussion from the Auckland Museum chaired by the famous comedian Te Radar features the social entrepreneur Kiritapu Allan, Professor Paul Spoonley from Massey University, the fibre artist Suzanne Tamaki, and Leilani Tamu, a poet, social commentator and Pacific historian. Together they are exploring fresh perspectives on the Treaty of Waitangi in a session recorded in March 2015.
Topics: education, history, politics, refugees and migrants, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Treaty of Waitangi, Tiriti o Waitangi
Duration: 40'24"

=SHOW NOTES=

Immigrants remain unintegrated into the New Zealand character.
How well the Treaty of Waitangi is understood depends on which part of the New Zealand population you’re talking about, according to Massey University’s Prof Paul Spoonley. The degree to which the immigrant communities feel a sense of connection to or understanding of biculturalism, and the role of the Treaty, is to Spoonley an open question.
When he looks around at immigrant-receiving countries, the thing that strikes him is that “they work very hard to make sure that those arriving are loyal citizens.” By contrast, in New Zealand he feels that we don’t make anything like the same effort.
“When you go to Australia” he says, “there’s a lot of investment in making them an Australian. And we don’t do that. Being a permanent resident gives you all the rights of a citizen. In fact we’re the only country in the world where a non-citizen can vote.”
And this lack of nationalistic fervor comes through in hour half-hearted use of the national flag. Speaking in a panel discussion about the Treaty of Waitangi hosted by the Auckland Museum, Spoonley comments “I don’t know whether the museum flies a flag. But when you go round there aren’t many flags. If we were in Australia we would have the flag behind this panel as a form of exclusive nationalism.”
About the participants
[image:50059:quarter]
Te Radar
Te Radar is a satirist, documentary maker, writer, stage and screen director, failed gardener, and amateur historian. He is best known for several television series about sustainable living, and more recently for two series looking at countries throughout the Pacific. He is currently working on a TV series called Radar's Chequered Past about New Zealand history. It is based on his acclaimed stage show Eating the Dog.
Kiritapu Allan
[image:50054:quarter]
Kiritapu is of Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi and Ngāti Tūwharetoa descent. Kiritapu has been a social entrepreneur and engaged in social justice issues since she was 16. She has founded several not-for-profit organisations that focus on developing leadership potential and has represented the Asia Pacific region at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Kiritapu is an Associate at Kahui Legal, a specialist law firm at the forefront of the Māori economy and advises on legal issues across a range of areas.
Paul Spoonley
[image:50057:quarter]
Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley is the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Massey University, New Zealand. He is the author or editor of 27 books on politics, employment and labour markets, ethnic identity and immigration. The award of a recent MBIE grant enables the New Zealand research team to examine the way in which immigation has contributed to superdiversity in global cities. Auckland will become a new site for this research.
Suzanne Tamaki
[image:50058:quarter]
Suzanne Tamaki (Maniapoto, Tūhoe, Te Arawa) is a fibre artist with the label Native Sista. She creates body adornment, costumes and jewellery inspired by legends and mythical creatures in the Pacific. Wāhine-toa feature prominently in her work, as she uses fashion to agitate discussions about indigenous issues in Aotearoa New Zealand. Suzanne was one of the founding members of the Pacific Sisters fashion collective in the mid 1990s. Her work has been exhibited extensively throughout New Zealand and the Pacific.
Leilani Tamu
[image:50056:quarter]
Leilani Tamu is a poet, social commentator, Pacific historian and former New Zealand diplomat. In 2013 she was the Fulbright/Creative New Zealand Writer in Residence at the University of Hawai'i in Mānoa. Prior to this, Leilani was a regular contributor to Auckland's Metro magazine where she tackled issues as diverse as racism, unemployment, property investment, cyber bullying, youth suicide and motherhood. Her debut book of poetry The Art of Excavation was published in August 2014.

===7:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Imagine if your day job involved staking-out rugged coastland waiting to bust “black-gold” paua-poaching rings. Lynda Chanwai-Earle brings us a feature documentary about “black gold” smuggling when she joins Fisheries Officers in a covert operation to bust paua poachers around the wild coastline of Wellington.

===7:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Selected Eva Radich exchanges with personalities from the world of music and the arts (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | The Shape of the Media===
=DESCRIPTION=

In an era when traditional media is changing rapidly, what’s the future for quality journalism? What alternatives can online media offer audiences? How is it paid for? What’s the effect of social media and celebrity culture? What are the implications for New Zealanders who can now get access to instant information wherever they are? Jim Mora hosts a discussion about the future of journalism with a panel including special guest Professor Graeme Turner.

===9:06 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:30 PM. | Insight===
=DESCRIPTION=

An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===10:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

In recent decades comics, artists and writers have stretched the boundaries of what we typically thought of as 'Comics'. Familiar scripts about super-heroes were joined on bookshelves by full-length autobiographical works that came to be called graphic novels. Often rejected by the mainstream comics industry, comics creators wanting to do new things started their own companies or went underground and by the 1990's the alternatives comics industry was in full swing and in the digital age they have flourished (RNZ)

===11:06 PM. | Beale Street Caravan===
=DESCRIPTION=

David Knowles introduces the Memphis-based radio show with an international reputation for its location recordings of blues musicians live in concert (F, BSC)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274495

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 26 Oct 2015

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