RNZ National. 2016-02-28. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

28 February 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Police Files of NZ (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Heart and Soul (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday; 3:05 Dancing Lessons, by Paddy Richardson, read by Hera Dunleavy (RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC); 5:10 Bishops, by Mona Williams (10 of 10, RNZ); 5:45 NZ Society

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

The Last Deer Culler and the Last Pack-Horse, by Jack Lasenby, told by Stuart Devenie; Nana's Spectacles, by Joy Cowley, told by Hone Kouka; Maru and the Seal, by David Somerset, told by Peter Vere-Jones; McGinty's Friend, by Diana Noonan, told by Robyn Malcolm; Miriam, by Robin Nathan, told by Denise O'Connell; Julie's Kakas, by David Somerset, told by Bernard Kearns

===7:10 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, politics from the insiders, plus Mediawatch and music 7:43 The Week In Parliament An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house 8:10 Insight An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs 9:06 Mediawatch Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in New Zealand's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:08
Alex Perrottet - Fiji Update
BODY:
Alex Perrottet from RNZ International has been in Fiji since Cyclone Winston battered the country last weekend.
Topics: Pacific, weather
Regions:
Tags: Fiji, Cyclone Winston
Duration: 8'41"

07:20
Brent Budowsky - US politics
BODY:
Brent Budowsky is a political columnist for The Hill and is based in Washington, DC. He is on the campaign trail in the US as candidates battle for their party's presidential nomination.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US presidential candidates, US caucuses, US primaries, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders
Duration: 12'45"

07:30
The Week In Parliament Sunday 28 February 2016
BODY:
Parliament was adjourned this week, but a sub-committee of the Social Services Committee met at Parliament on Tuesday and in Auckland on Thursday for submissions on the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill - which has received limited supported from many submitters.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'05"

07:47
Brian O'Connell - Election in Ireland
BODY:
Ireland went to the polls on Friday for the general election after a campaign featuring two major gangland murders - and the Prime Minister Enda Kenny getting offside with voters in his electorate by calling them whingers. Journalist and broadcaster Brian O'Connell with the latest.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Ireland, Irish politics
Duration: 9'19"

08:40
Joanna Preston and James Norcliffe - Canterbury Poems
BODY:
sirens before dawn someone meets their neighbour for the first time - this Haiku by Doc Drumheller is from Leaving the Red Zone - poems from the Canterbury earthquakes - an anthology of poetry from contributors across New Zealand, edited by James Norcliffe, former poetry editor for The Press, and Joanna Preston, poetry editor for takahe magazine.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Canterbury earthquakes, poetry
Duration: 14'52"

09:38
Estelle Tang - Bibliotherapy
BODY:
It goes without saying that there isn't a psychological problem or emotional dilemma that hasn't, in some way or another, been explored in the world of literature. But does reading fictional accounts of people grappling with their issues really help you resolve yours? New York-based Estelle Tang - one of just a handful of bibliotherapists around the world dishing out reading prescriptions - believes it can.
Topics: books, health
Regions:
Tags: bibliotherapy, Estelle Tang
Duration: 22'35"

10:10
Emad Burnat - How Many More Broken Cameras?
BODY:
Emad Burnat is the director of the Oscar-nominated 5 Broken Cameras, a 2011 documentary that tells the story of the efforts of the people of Bil'in - a Palestinian village in the West Bank - to resist the confiscation of more than half their agricultural lands by the Israeli military to build the so-called separation barrier. Burnat's film documents the first five years of protests that continue to this day. Emad Burnat is in New Zealand for a series of talks and screenings of 5 Broken Cameras.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Palestine, film, Israel, Emad, Burnat, 5 Broken Cameras
Duration: 19'36"

10:30
Roman Krznaric - On Empathy
BODY:
Roman Krznaric is one of Britain's leading philosophers. He is a founding member of The School of Life, along with Alain de Botton, and is also the founder of the world's first empathy museum. He speaks with Wallace on how we have lost the art of conversation, and with it, the art of empathy and compassion, and gives some insight on how we can all be more empathetic when it comes to our fellow human beings.
EXTENDED BODY:
Roman Krznaric wants us to think a little bit more about empathy in today's world. He is the founder of the world's first Empathy Museum and his writings on empathy have been wildly influential amongst politicians, education reformers and environment campaigners.
He tells Wallace Chapman we have lost the art of conversation, and with it, the art of empathy and compassion, and gives some insight into how we can all be more empathic:
Roman is also a founding member of The School of Life and was one of Britain's leadiing philosophers named by The Observer.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: empathy, Roman Krznaric, Modern Day Philosophy
Duration: 20'05"

11:05
Lisa Harrow and Benjamin Henson - Pop-Up Shakespeare
BODY:
400 years after the death of William Shakespeare - the bard is in town. An exact replica of the famous Globe theatre has sprung up in Auckland, where a series of Shakespeare plays are being performed. British director Benjamin Henson and Kiwi actress Lisa Harrow join Wallace to talk about their interpretation of The Tempest and why it is - 400 years on - that Shakespeare remains as relevant today as he did in his own era.
EXTENDED BODY:
400 years after the death of William Shakespeare - the bard is in town. An exact replica of the famous Globe theatre has sprung up in Auckland, where a series of Shakespeare plays are being performed. British director Benjamin Henson and Kiwi actress Lisa Harrow join Wallace to talk about their interpretation of The Tempest and why it is - 400 years on - that Shakespeare remains as relevant today as he did in his own era.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Pop-up Globe, Lisa Harrow, Shakespeare, Benjamin Henson, theatre
Duration: 22'32"

11:30
Jaz Coleman - Killing Joke
BODY:
Killing Joke vocalist Jaz Coleman reflects on the secret of the band's success and shares his thoughts on the state of the world. Jaz Coleman is speaking at The Classic Comedy Club, Auckland, February 28, 7pm.
Topics: arts, music
Regions:
Tags: Killing Joke, Jaz Coleman
Duration: 18'06"

11:47
Campbell Smith - Auckland City Limits
BODY:
Music promoter Campbell Smith joins Wallace to outline the upcoming music festival Auckland City Limits and speak about the resurgence in popularity of music festivals in New Zealand
Topics: arts, music
Regions:
Tags: music festivals, Auckland City Limits, Kendrick Lamar
Duration: 9'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:60574:full]
[image:60921:quarter]
7:08 Alex Perrottet - Fiji Update
Alex Perrottet from RNZ International has been in Fiji since Cyclone Winston battered the country last weekend.
7:20 Brent Budowsky - US politics
Brent Budowsky is a political columnist for The Hill and is based in Washington, DC. He is on the campaign trail in the US as candidates battle for their party's presidential nomination.
7:30 News headlines
7:32 The Week in Parliament
[image:60922:quarter]
7:47 Brian O'Connell - Election in Ireland
Ireland went to the polls on Friday for the general election after a campaign featuring two major gangland murders - and the Prime Minister Enda Kenny getting offside with voters in his electorate by calling them whingers. Journalist and broadcaster Brian O'Connell with the latest.
8:12 Insight: The Race for a New US President
Americans are in the grip of a dramatic and exciting contest to choose a new president, to replace Barack Obama. On the Republican side the billionaire businessman Donald Trump has made a strong start, as has the Democratic candidate, the Senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders. But what is driving their popularity? RNZ's political editor, Jane Patterson, reports on the widespread anger with Washington politicians and the influence of big money in American politics, as well as simmering racial tension and concerns about jobs, the cost of the living and the economy - all of which are having a major impact on the presidential primary race.
Produced by Philippa Tolley.
[image:60880:full]
8:40 Joanna Preston and James Norcliffe - Canterbury Poems
sirens before dawn
someone meets their neighbour
for the first time
- this Haiku by Doc Drumheller is from Leaving the Red Zone - poems from the Canterbury earthquakes - an anthology of poetry from contributors across New Zealand, edited by James Norcliffe, former poetry editor for The Press, and Joanna Preston, poetry editor for takahē magazine.
9:06 Mediawatch
How things have changed for the media in Christchurch in the five years since the deadly quake struck in 2011. Also: Strong criticism of RNZ's coverage of Maori issues, and RNZ's response; and the resignation of NZ's longest-serving news boss - and the Australian editor who will replace him.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Estelle Tang - Bibliotherapy
It goes without saying that there isn't a psychological problem or emotional dilemma that hasn't, in some way or another, been explored in the world of literature. But does reading fictional accounts of people grappling with their issues really help you resolve yours? New York-based Estelle Tang - one of just a handful of bibliotherapists around the world dishing out reading prescriptions - believes it can.
10:06 Emad Burnat - How Many More Broken Cameras?
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XID_UuxiGxM
Emad Burnat is the director of the Oscar-nominated 5 Broken Cameras, a 2011 documentary that tells the story of the efforts of the people of Bil'in - a Palestinian village in the West Bank - to resist the confiscation of more than half their agricultural lands by the Israeli military to build the so-called separation barrier. Burnat's film documents the first five years of protests that continue to this day. Emad Burnat is in New Zealand for a series of talks and screenings of 5 Broken Cameras.
Screening Times:
HAMILTON - 8pm Sunday 28 February, Lido Cinema, Level 1 Centre Place, 501 Victoria St.
PORIRUA - 4.30pm Monday 29 February, Whitireia Porirua Campus (TBC).
WELLINGTON - 6pm Tuesday 1 March, Parliament and 5.30pm Wednesday 2 March, Cotton Building LT 122, Victoria University.
DUNEDIN - 6pm Friday 4 March, Red Lecture Theatre, Scott Building on Great King St.
CHRISTCHURCH - 6pm Sunday 6 March, WEA 59 Gloucester St.
[image:60926:full]
10:35 Roman Krznaric - On Empathy
[image:60923:third]
Roman Krznaric is one of Britain's leading philosophers. He is a founding member of The School of Life, along with Alain de Botton, and is also the founder of the world's first Empathy Museum. He speaks with Wallace on how we have lost the art of conversation, and with it, the art of empathy and compassion, and gives some insight on how we can all be more empathetic when it comes to our fellow human beings.

11:05 Lisa Harrow and Benjamin Henson - Pop-Up Shakespeare
[image_crop:7490:third]
Four hundred years after the death of William Shakespeare - the bard is in town. An exact replica of the famous Globe theatre has sprung up in Auckland, where a series of Shakespeare plays are being performed. British director Benjamin Henson and Kiwi actress Lisa Harrow join Wallace to talk about their interpretation of The Tempest and why it is - 400 years on - that Shakespeare remains as relevant today as he did in his own era.
11:30 Jaz Coleman - Killing Joke
Killing Joke vocalist Jaz Coleman reflects on the secret of the band's success and shares his thoughts on the state of the world.
Jaz Coleman is speaking at The Classic Comedy Club, Auckland, February 28, 7pm.
11:47 Campbell Smith - Auckland City Limits
Music promoter Campbell Smith joins Wallace to outline the upcoming music festival Auckland City Limits and speak about the resurgence in popularity of music festivals in New Zealand.
[image:60925:full]

===12:11 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

People, places and events in New Zealand (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:10
The Complicated Game of Love
BODY:
There are thousands of songs written about it and poets and artists the world over have found some of their greatest inspiration from it. Yes, we're talking about love. But today, finding love is a game that comes with a raft of complicated, and sometimes unwritten rules. In this week's Spectrum, Sonia Sly looks at the pros and cons in the world of online dating and the complexities of forming a relationship for those who you don't fit into a conventional box.
EXTENDED BODY:
By Sonia Sly
He loves me... he loves me not... he loves me... he loves me not.
Once upon a time you might have been surrounded by a small, but growing mound of daisy petals meditating on thoughts of love, hoping that the object of your affections might someday return his / her affections in kind.
But today, the smart phone replaces the dainty daisy stalk and the method of plucking petals – to determine whether he loves me – has morphed into the action of swiping a finger left or right on a handheld device. Technology gives us greater control of the possible outcome when it comes to that search for love – or so we like to think.
Do I like him? Maybe... maybe not... DELETE!
The abundance of online dating sites and apps might be convenient, but are they proving productive?
Sonia Sly explores the ins and outs of online dating, polyamory, and the importance of smell when it comes to finding the perfect match:
Twenty four-year-old Lena Duffin enjoys the immediacy of dating app Tinder. She isn't desperate to settle down and is confident that there are plenty of fish in the sea.
“I can be on Tinder swiping left or right for hours [and] if one guys doesn’t work out, I'm on to the next one,” she says.
Duffin has a high match rate on Tinder, but while she actively uses the site she also feels that people are less likely to commit, and adds that plenty of bad behaviour plays out online.
“What I consider bad etiquette is people being vulgar [or] making crude comments. I’m [also] not interested in seeing a picture of a guy naked before we’ve even met. [When that happens] I un-match them” ~ Lena Duffin.

Duffin believes that people operate without boundaries far too often if they're behind a keyboard.
“I’ve had friends where guys have been really mean to them,” she says. Again, she cites the use of offensive comments made. "It's definitely not acceptable behaviour."
So do apps like Tinder propel us towards the idea that we're all slightly disposable and that love is meaningless? And are our efforts to meet genuine people online all in vain? After all, if someone new is just a swipe or chat message away, why not take another dip in the online ocean?
Jay is in her thirties and went shopping online for her perfect match, only to find herself in an awkward situation where a man she met on Trademe didn't live up to expectations. “We hadn’t spoken before, so we arranged to meet for lunch and unfortunately he wasn't wearing his cap and sunglasses from his online photo," she says.
Jay explains that the man she had agreed to meet had disguised his features on his profile photo.
"To put it simply, he was not attractive. He was a little bit bald [and] when he spoke I could see all of his teeth, including his gums," she says. "I don’t think I’m ridiculously superficial, but he also had a speech impediment [and] when he spoke, some of his food landed on me. He was also sweating profusely, and might I add, it wasn’t a particularly hot day…” For Jay, that date has left a lasting impression.
But while dating online comes with a host of issues, how does dating work when you're an individual whose gender isn't clear cut?
Sam Orchard was raised as a girl, but today refers to himself as a trans-guy. He looked fleetingly at online dating, but says meeting a new partner is complex. Earlier on, body issues played an inhibiting factor in his desire to get involved in the dating scene.
"I hardly dated at all [and] I think I had a block about wanting to be intimate with people. I was coming across as quite a butch woman [but] you never see butch women in the media portrayed as hot, so I thought I was just a yuck person" ~ Sam Orchard.

"It's really complicated when we have complicated bodies, but for me that's certainly part of the attraction of being attracted to other trans or gender-queer and non-binary people."
Orchard feels more at home these days as a trans-guy who hangs out in the bear community: "They're basically hairy guys with big bellies," he laughs, "Just like me." Orchard has dealt with his body issues and says open communication is imperative, whether dating online or meeting someone at a bar. One of the main differences, he says, is the laborious task of having to explain his body to potential new partners.
Today, having experienced both sides of the gender coin he admits that dating and relationships aren't so different now to when he was perceived to be a girl.
"I'm still the same person and relationships are hard work and wonderful, just like other relationships," he says.

Topics: health, science, technology
Regions: Wellington Region, Auckland Region, Otago
Tags: relationships, tinder, online dating, pan-sexuality, bisexuality, homosexuality, transgender, health, sexuality, Polyamory, marriage, monogamy, Grinder, lifestyle
Duration: 28'52"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:37 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment

=AUDIO=

12:40
Paul James - CEO of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage
BODY:
The Ministry for Culture and Heritage is openly inviting arts organisations to look further afield for its funding, rather than simply relying on the tax-payer. They suggest looking for funding from individual philanthropists, as well as the increasingly popular crowd-funding for smaller projects. Lynn asks the Ministry's Chief Executive Paul James how's that message is being received by the arts community - a sector that contributes 2 billion dollars into the economy.
Topics: history, arts
Regions:
Tags: funding
Duration: 7'55"

12:50
Ella Gilbert - A Kiwi Theatre-Maker in Iran
BODY:
Two Wellington theatre makers have recently returned from Iran. They spent a month working with an Iranian theatre company and attending the country's biggest theatre event, a massive festival. The two young Kiwis, Ella Gilbert and Poppy Serano, were working on their own play as well as getting an insight into Iran's theatre scene. Lynn talks to Ella about the often contradictory scene in Iran.
EXTENDED BODY:
Two Wellington theatre makers have recently returned from Iran. They spent a month working with an Iranian theatre company and attending the country's biggest theatre event, a massive festival. The two young Kiwis, Ella Gilbert and Poppy Serano, were working on their own play as well as getting an insight into Iran's theatre scene. Lynn talks to Ella about the often contradictory scene in Iran.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre, Iran
Duration: 8'29"

13:35
Stallone Ioasa - Breaking All The Rules
BODY:
The New Zealand-Samoan comedy-drama Three Wise Cousins has been doing astonishingly well, first in Auckland and then in Wellington and Palmerston North. In some cinemas it's even out-grossing the new Star Wars, and this despite the fact that - until now - very few people had even heard of it. Simon decided to find out why, and talked to the director, cameraman, writer, producer and publicist of the film. They're all one man - Stallone Ioasa.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, Three Wise Cousins
Duration: 14'42"

13:48
Julia Wayne - Saving The World's Classic Movies
BODY:
More than 80 percent of films made before 1929 have been lost - damaged beyond repair, thrown out or reused. In an effort to save what remains, film maker Martin Scorsese set up the Film Foundation in the US quarter of a century ago. The foundation's free educational curriculum, The Story of Movies, teaches young people - over 10 million to date - about film language and history. Julia Wayne works for the non-profit organisation, and Lynn spoke to her on a visit to New Zealand.
Topics: arts, history
Regions:
Tags: film, The Film Foundation
Duration: 14'57"

14:24
Rick Gekoski - Rare Book Dealer
BODY:
Rick Gekoski is regarded as one of the world's leading bookmen: a rare-book dealer, non fiction writer, broadcaster, academic - and soon to be first time published novellist, in his 70s. He's got to know a lot of contemporary writers over the years - they trust him so much they let him arrange to sell their libraries and archives. Rick's coming to Dunedin for the 2016 World Book Day Lecture, organised by The Centre for the Book at Otago University.
EXTENDED BODY:
Rick Gekoski is regarded as one of the world's leading bookmen – a rare-book dealer, nonfiction writer, broadcaster, academic – and soon to be first-time published novelist (in his 70s). He's got to know a lot of contemporary writers over the years – they trust him so much they let him arrange to sell their libraries and archives.
Lynn Freeman catches up with him, ahead of his visit to Dunedin for the 2016 World Book Day Lecture, organised by Otago University's Centre for the Book:

Topics: arts, history, books
Regions:
Tags: book dealers, rare books
Duration: 19'03"

14:38
Murdoch Stevens - Behind the Scenes of a Publishing House
BODY:
What gets published and what doesn't? How is it presented and illustrated? What gets heavily-edited and what sticks close to the original? These are all decisions made behind the closed doors of the world's publishing houses. Now a new anthology promises to show readers what really goes on behind the scenes. Still got all our fingers and toes marks the first ten years of the Lawrence & Gibson publishing collective in Wellington. The editor of Lawrence and Gibson, Murdoch Stephens, says it includes notes on books that were rejected and photographs of how books are bound.
Topics: arts, history, books
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: publishing, Lawrence and Gibson
Duration: 9'48"

14:48
Oscar Enberg - Visual Arts Resident in Berlin
BODY:
An early mining settlement in the mountains of Germany that now produces carved wooden toys is where New Zealand artist Oscar Enberg is heading. He's just been announced as this year's recipient of Creative New Zealand's Visual Arts Residency in Berlin. The Auckland based artist told Lynn Freeman he's fascinated by the contrast between mass production and traditional craftspeople.
Topics: arts, history
Regions:
Tags: Germany, mining, crafts, handcrafting, toys
Duration: 6'53"

=SHOW NOTES=

12.42 Paul James - CEO of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage
The Ministry for Culture and Heritage is openly inviting arts organisations to look further afield for its funding, rather than simply relying on the tax-payer. They suggest looking for funding from individual philanthropists, as well as the increasingly popular crowd-funding for smaller projects. Lynn asks the Ministry's Chief Executive Paul James how's that message is being received by the arts community - a sector that contributes 2 billion dollars into the economy..
An early mining settlement in the mountains of Germany that now produces carved wooden toys is where New Zealand artist Oscar Enberg is heading. He's just been announced as this year's recipient of Creative New Zealand's Visual Arts Residency in Berlin. The Auckland based artist told Lynn Freeman he's fascinated by the contrast between mass production and traditional craftspeople.
12.49 Ella Gilbert - A Kiwi Theatre-Maker in Iran
Two Wellington theatre makers have recently returned from Iran. They spent a month working with an Iranian theatre company and attending the country's biggest theatre event, a massive festival. The two young Kiwis, Ella Gilbert and Poppy Serano, were working on their own play as well as getting an insight into Iran's theatre scene. Lynn talks to Ella about the often contradictory scene in Iran.
1.10 At The Movies
Dad's Army, Concussion, 45 years - and breakout Pacific Island hit Three wise cousins.
1.35 Stallone Ioasa - Breaking All The Rules
The New Zealand-Samoan comedy-drama Three Wise Cousins has been doing astonishingly well, first in Auckland and then in Wellington and Palmerston North. In some cinemas it's even out-grossing the new Star Wars. And this despite the fact that - until now - very few people had even heard of it. Simon decided to find out why, and talked to the director, cameraman, writer, producer and publicist of the film. They're all one man - Stallone Ioasa.
[image:60946:half]
1.48 Julia Wayne - Saving The World's Classic Movies
More than 80 percent of films made before 1929 have been lost - damaged beyond repair, thrown out or reused. In an effort to save what remains, film maker Martin Scorsese set up the Film Foundation in the US quarter of a century ago. During that time it's saved around 700 films - American, and now movies made outside of the States. It has made these films accessible to the public through programming at festivals, museums, and educational institutions around the world. The Film Foundation's World Cinema Project has restored 26 films from 19 different countries representing the rich diversity of world cinema. The foundation's free educational curriculum, The Story of Movies, teaches young people - over 10 million to date - about film language and history.Julia Wayne works for the non-profit organisation, and Lynn spoke to her on a visit to New Zealand.
2.04 The Laugh Track - Jonathan Hendry
[image:60948:half]
Jonathan Hendry is the new Artistic Director of the Fortune Theatre in Dunedin. He's been busy since graduating from Toi Whakaari:NZ Drama School in 1988 from exploring Marae based theatre in the early 90s, touring shows around the country, playing supporting and lead roles in television and film through to developing new work with New Zealand writers he has employed a strong and diverse range of skills in a variety of contexts.An Artistic fellow of Shakespeare’s Globe in London he has a passion for sharing Shakespeare’s work to new audiences. Credits as an actor include Richard the Third, Macbeth, Iago, Jaques and Malvolio. He’s guided both students and professionals to well received performances.He has joined the Fortune Theatre as Artistic Director after nearly a decade and a half of leading actor training at UNITEC School of Performing and Screen Arts and Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School. His Laugh Track choices include Kenneth Williams, Madeleine Kahn, Julia Davis and Peter Sellers.
[image:60952:half]
2.24 Rick Gekoski - Rare Book Dealer
Rick Gekoski is regarded as one of the world's leading bookmen: a rare-book dealer, non fiction writer, broadcaster, academic - and soon to be first time published novellist, in his 70s. He's got to know a lot of contemporary writers over the years - they trust him so much they let him arrange to sell their libraries and archives. Rick's coming to Dunedin for the 2016 World Book Day Lecture, organised by The Centre for the Book at Otago University.
2.38 Editor Murdoch Stevens - Behind the Scenes of a Publishing House
What gets published and what doesn't? How is it presented and illustrated? What gets heavily-edited and what sticks close to the original? These are all decisions made behind the closed doors of the world's publishing houses. Now a new anthology promises to show readers what really goes on behind the scenes. Still got all our fingers and toes marks the first ten years of the Lawrence & Gibson publishing collective in Wellington. The editor of Lawrence and Gibson, Murdoch Stephens, says it includes notes on books that were rejected and photographs of how books are bound.
2.48 Oscar Enberg - Visual Arts Resident in Berlin
An early mining settlement in the mountains of Germany that now produces carved wooden toys is where New Zealand artist Oscar Enberg is heading. He's just been announced as this year's recipient of Creative New Zealand's Visual Arts Residency in Berlin. The Auckland based artist told Lynn Freeman he's fascinated by the contrast between mass production and traditional craftspeople.
3.04 Drama At Three

===3:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting radio playwriting and performance: The Great Tennessee Monkey Trial by Peter Goodchild (2 of 2)

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Black Holes Ain't As Black As They are painted
The Cambridge cosmologist Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the second of his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. Professor Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. (BBC World Service)

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Religion in Silicon Valley
Peter Bowes explores how traditional faiths co-exist with the all-consuming worlds of the tech companies - many of which have their own philosophies, cultures and belief systems.

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
Ngaa Rauuira Puumanawawhiti
BODY:
Ngaa Rauuira Puumanawawhiti starred in the documentary film Māori Boy Genius released in 2011. Ngaa graduated with a Diploma from Te Wānanga o Raukawa when he was just 13 years old. In 2009 at just 15 years old he studied for a semester at Yale, an Ivy League University in New Haven, Connecticut. In the film, He described himself as an accelerated learner. Since the film release four years ago, Ngaa is now living in Rotorua with a new job at The New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute in Rotorua. Justine Murray talks to Ngaa and his mum Maakarita about the impact of the movie, and life today.
EXTENDED BODY:
Ngaa Rauuira Puumanawawhiti starred in the 2012 documentary film Māori Boy Genius.
Justine Murray catches up with Ngaa (nō Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Raukawa, Tuhoe), who the world saw as a young teen, and is now a young man finding his place in the world:
In the film he likened his education pathway to Tane nui a rangi, who ascended the heavens to reach the three baskets of knowledge. A self-described accelerated learner, Ngaa's mother Maakarita Paku says Ngaa expressed a desire for learning from age 3 or 4. Today, Ngaa Rauuira is 21 years old and works as a researcher and communications co-ordinator at The New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute in Rotorua.
For ages I really struggled to deal with the weight of [the title Māori Boy Genius]. On the other hand I have had to reconcile what I now understand that actually initiates the conversation, what is genius to our people? To me the genius, I suppose which I possess, does not come from me as an individual, but the education system and the upbringing from which I came. So if I looked at it from that basis there are many geniuses out there, I've met them, they go to places like Te Wānanga o Raukawa, they have kōhanga and kura kaupapa roots.

It's a job that adheres to his core values of fostering Māori Arts. His success and the milestone of his 21st birthday was tarnished when his grandmother Janet Paku passed away in November 2014. Ngaa says his new role means he can take Māori people and culture to the world. Rotorua is a fair way from Otaki and Napier where Ngaa grew up, but he says he's looking forward to delving into the kapahaka scene.
My parents have a strong Tino Rangatiratanga streak, so [they were] heavily involved in the Māori revitalisation movement in Otaki, whakatipuranga rua mano....so that's from my childhood up to seven years, and that is tempered again by the values of my grandparents. So there's an interesting convergence there of Christian, socialist religious roots and Mana Māori Motuhake worldview.

In 2007 Ngaa Rauuira enrolled at Te Wānanga o Raukawa in the Diploma of Mātauranga Māori, he graduated that year aged 13. In 2009 he studied his first semester at Yale in Politics and Law. In 2010 he returned to Yale for another semester when he was only 16 years old, which is when the cameras started rolling.
In 2011 Ngaa graduated from Te Wānanga o Raukawa with a Bachelor Degree in Mātauranga Māori, he returned in 2013 to begin his Masters and graduated in 2014.
In the film Māori Boy Genius, Ngaa's mum Maakarita Paku is supportive of her son's higher learning aspirations. She says she put her design career to the side to raise her family - Maakarita gave birth to her daughter Heriata, who today is five years old. The busy filming schedule in 2010 was disruptive to whanau life, but she was adamant to convey a story to the viewers from a Māori worldview. One aspect of the film that was difficult was the title, she says it still doesn't sit well with her today.
Despite the release five years ago, she still fields emails and Facebook contact from people interested in Ngaa Rauuira.
Director and producer Pietra Brettkelly heard about Ngaa's story through her producer friend, Joanna Paul. Pietra spent sixteen months filming the family and spent a year in post production. From London, Pietra Brettkelly shares her perspective about the film four years on.
Topics: te ao Maori, education
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: Ngaa Rauuira Puumanawhiti, Maakarita Paku, Pietra Brettkelly, Maori Boy Genius
Duration: 29'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:40 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:05 PM. | TED Radio Hour===
=DESCRIPTION=

===8:06 PM. | Sunday Night===
=DESCRIPTION=

An evening of music and nostalgia (RNZ)

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in New Zealand's news media (RNZ)

===10:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

Previewing the resumption of parliamentary sittings on 9 February

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of music that's "shaken, not stirred" every week from the Underground Martini Bunker at Kansas Public Radio (6 of 12, KPR)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288141

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 28 Feb 2016

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