RNZ National. 2016-03-08. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

08 March 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:05 From the World (RNZ); 2:05 The Retro Cocktail Hour (KPR) 3:05 Sorry, I'm a Stranger Here Myself by Peter Bland (7 of 10, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 8 March 2016
BODY:
Hanmer Springs is cut off as firefighters battle a huge bush fire. There's a spike in the number of financial transactions linked to terrorism and businesses supplying Fonterra say they're being squeezed financially.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28'34"

06:05
Sports News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'03"

06:10
Fonterra suppliers say co-op's payment demands are crippling
BODY:
Businesses that supply services to Fonterra say the dairy giant are railing against payment demands they say are crippling and that no other company could get away with.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 2'34"

06:12
Payroll problems going back years at Government ministry
BODY:
Thousands of public servants may have been underpaid for decades because of a payroll error that could cost the ministry involved a 'significant' amount.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: public servants, pay
Duration: 2'59"

06:15
Thousands of migrants stranded on Greece-Macedonia border
BODY:
Up to fourteen thousand migrants are now stranded at the Greek-Macedonian border, with numbers rising by the day.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Macedonia, refugees
Duration: 3'50"

06:21
Early Business News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'17"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'08"

06:39
Hanmer Springs cut off and lost power
BODY:
North Canterbury's Hanmer Springs is cut off and has lost power as a scrub fire burns out of control in a river bed near the town.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: fire, Hanmer Springs
Duration: 1'30"

06:41
Transactions being linked to terrorism almost double
BODY:
The number of financial transactions being linked to terrorism has almost doubled in the last two years
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: terrorism, financial transactions
Duration: 2'29"

06:49
Hiring expectations slow: shortages see wage pressures emerge
BODY:
The employment group, Manpower, says the pace of hiring has slowed and wage pressures have increased as employers struggle to find the right staff.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Manpower
Duration: 1'51"

06:51
New Zealand banking system stable but there are risks - S&P
BODY:
The rating's agency, Standard and Poors, says New Zealand's banking system is stable -- but faces some risks.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Standard and Poors, banks
Duration: 1'39"

06:53
Review finds businesses have trouble filing ACC forms
BODY:
A review of ACC payments made by more than one-thousand businesses has found that half have made reporting errors, and about a third have been paying too much.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: ACC payments
Duration: 2'04"

06:56
NZ's commercial property market attracts international interest
BODY:
One of the world's leading property investment companies says New Zealand's commercial property market offers attractive yields at affordable prices compared to the rest of the world.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: investors, commercial property
Duration: 1'24"

06:57
Tru-Test plans to build plant in Europe
BODY:
The electric fence maker, Tru-Test, is planning to build a manufacturing plant in Europe in the next couple of years.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Tru-Test
Duration: 1'31"

06:58
Morning markets for 8 March 2016
BODY:
American stocks modestly higher.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 45"

07:07
Sports News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'04"

07:10
Hanmer cut off by major scrub fire
BODY:
A scrub fire is out of control in DoC land near Hanmer Springs.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hanmer Springs, fire
Duration: 2'57"

07:13
70 firefighters battle blaze near Hanmer Springs.
BODY:
Allan Grigg is the Principal Rural Fire Officer for the Hurunui District .. he is also emergency management officer for the council.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hanmer Springs, fire
Duration: 4'08"

07:17
Number of transactions linked to terrorism rises
BODY:
There has been a spike in the number of financial transactions suspected of being linked to terrorism.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: terrorism, financial transactions
Duration: 3'35"

07:22
Fonterra suppliers say co-op's payment demands are crippling
BODY:
Businesses that supply Fonterra say the dairy giant is putting the squeeze on them in a way no other company could get away with.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 3'42"

07:25
Todd Barclay admits he has made some mistakes as a new MP
BODY:
The National Party MP for Clutha-Southland, Todd Barclay has admitted that he has made some mistakes.
Topics: politics
Regions: Southland
Tags: Todd Barclay
Duration: 2'14"

07:28
Sole blood-testing Auckland clinic slammed by patients
BODY:
Frustrated patients are complaining about the length of time they have to wait to get important blood tests in Auckland at the weekend.
Topics: health
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: blood tests
Duration: 3'22"

07:36
Affco and Meat Workers Union dispute continues
BODY:
The long running dispute between Affco and the Meat Workers Union is likely to end up back in court.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: AFFCO
Duration: 2'23"

07:43
Key wants Labour'ssupport on intelligence and security review
BODY:
MPs meet today to consider the findings of the intelligence and security review.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: intelligence and security review
Duration: 5'36"

07:49
Ministry's fiscal management called into question
BODY:
Treasury papers have called into question the health ministry's financial management over a blow-out in the cost of refitting its Wellington HQ.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags: Health Ministry
Duration: 5'24"

07:54
Defence to ask for submarine detection upgrade
BODY:
The Defence Force wants to upgrade the submarine detection systems on its Orions.
Topics: defence force
Regions:
Tags: submarine detection systems
Duration: 2'56"

07:57
New book claims Tony Abbott ignored numerous warnings
BODY:
A new book looking at Tony Abbott's time as Australian prime minister reveals he ignored several warnings to dump his chief of staff to save himself.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Tony Abbott
Duration: 2'29"

08:07
Sports News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'16"

08:11
Fire moving too fast to risk fire crews
BODY:
Seventy firefighters are battling a huge bush fire that's left the North Canterbury town of Hanmer Springs cut off and without power.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hanmer Springs, fire
Duration: 4'16"

08:15
NZ could be seen as a soft target for terrorists transactions
BODY:
There has been a spike in the number of reported financial transactions suspected of being linked to terrorism in New Zealand.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: terrorism, financial transactions
Duration: 4'10"

08:19
European Union looks to stem migrant flow at summit
BODY:
European Union leaders at an emergency summit are attempting to stem the flow of migrants into the continent ahead of an anticipated summer influx.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: refugees, EU, Turkey
Duration: 5'09"

08:26
Young Africans stories need to be heard
BODY:
The former race relations conciliator, Gregory Fortuin, says the stories young Africans have told are authentic and shouldn't be ignored.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: police, racial discrimination
Duration: 4'33"

08:31
Markets Update for 8 March 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 57"

08:36
Asteroid swings by Earth
BODY:
Planet Earth may have just had a close shave with an asteroid.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Asteroid
Duration: 2'42"

08:40
Fonterra cuts dairy payout
BODY:
Further to this Fonterra has just lowered its payout to farmers to $3.90.
Topics: farming, rural
Regions:
Tags: dairy prices, Fonterra
Duration: 3'15"

08:44
Northland ex-state houses for needy families
BODY:
There's just one more hurdle to jump before nine needy Northland families can move into their very own ex-state houses.
Topics: housing
Regions: Northland
Tags: He Korowai Trust
Duration: 3'41"

08:48
Women describes being shot in the leg in attempted murder case
BODY:
A woman has described how she was shot in the leg before her husband wrestled with the gunman and she passed out.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Martin Victor Lyttelton
Duration: 2'32"

08:51
Revamped NZ Book Awards offering up $50,000 prize
BODY:
Four novels, including one debut novel, are in the running to win a new $50,000 prize at this year's New Zealand Book Awards.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Book Awards
Duration: 2'55"

08:54
Traditional Maori musical instruments mix with classical
BODY:
A collection of taonga puoro, traditional Maori musical instruments has been donated to the University of Waikato and some will be played at a concert there this evening.
EXTENDED BODY:
A collection of Māori musical instruments given to the University of Waikato will be played this evening before going on display.

Examples of taonga puoro. Photo: RNZ / Diego Opatowski

The 50 taonga puoro were made by master carver Brian Flintoff.
They were donated to the university by its former dean Ian Graham and his wife Agi Lehar-Graham.
A piece of music by Martin Lodge showing how Māori and western classical music can mix will be premiered tonight.
Dr Lodge said the two styles of music went well together.
"I've tried to keep the complete integrity of both traditions, so they meet without either sacrificing its integrity and somehow I think it's a harmonious meeting and something fresh arises."
The taonga puoro, works of art in their own right, would go on display when they were not being played, Dr Lodge said.
Topics: history, music, te ao Maori
Regions: Waikato
Tags: taonga puoro, Brian Flintoff, Martin Lodge
Duration: 4'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Bulibasha by Witi Ihimaera read by George Henare (7 of 15, Word Pictures)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Fonterra's milk forecast now in "Severe" scenario
BODY:
Fonterra's latest forecast milk payout has just been released, positioning it squarely in line with the severe scenario painted by the Reserve Bank. The dairy cooperative has just announced it'll cut its payout per kilogram of milk solids from a forecast four dollars 15, to three dollars 90. Fonterra has also told external suppliers they need to cut their charges by at least 10 percent....prompting claims the company is bullying small businesses and using them to cover their working capital shortfall. Will Wilson is an agricultural consultant, company director and part owner and director of several dairy farms.
Topics: farming
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra, milk price
Duration: 13'25"

09:22
West Coast Mayors apply pressure on policing proposal
BODY:
West Coast mayors are appealing to the Police Minister to step in and stop a plan to cut community constables and youth aid workers in the area. Police are proposing a major overhaul of policing in the West Coast police area that covers over 23 thousand square kilometres. If the plan goes ahead Westport, Greymouth and Hokitika will lose both their community constables and Youth Aid police. The remote centre of Karamea at the very top of the West Coast district (popn police area 560) will also lose its only constable. It's also proposed that Ross (popn 810) will lose its constable but there will be further consultation on that. The plan is that policing will be centralised at Greymouth - there will be one youth aid officer for the area and a tactical squad focussed on drug and gang crime that will employ three officers. All up, 8 jobs are being disestablished and 8 others will be created. West Coast Mayors have sent a letter to the Minister Judith Collins calling for a halt to the plan. The Mayor of Westland is Mike Havill and the Mayor of Buller is Mayor Garry Howard
Topics: rural
Regions:
Tags: rural, West Coast, Karamea, Greymouth, Hokitika, Westport, Ross, Mike Havill, Garry Howard, police, youth aid
Duration: 15'08"

09:37
Corporate giants under increasing pressure to pay more tax
BODY:
Facebook is the latest major corporate to bow to the increasing pressure mounting on multi-national companies to pay their fair share of tax. It will start paying tax on major advertisement revenue in the UK rather than Ireland. Google, Amazon and Apple are among other high profile companies that have been under fire for using loopholes in tax systems to avoid paying tax, by shifting profits to countries with low tax regimes. The OECD estimates that multinationals' tax avoidance is worth between 100 and 240 billion US dollars annually. The European Union has recently come out with an Anti Tax Avoidance Package saying billions of euros are lost to public budgets every year. It follows the OECD's BEPS - Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project - which requires companies to disclose to tax authorities how much they are making and in which countries, so they can be properly taxed.So how are countries receiving these new rules? And will they mean big global corporates won't be able to shelter profits in low-or-no tax countries. Adrian Sawyer is a Professor of Taxation at Canterbury University.
Topics: economy, law
Regions:
Tags: tax, taxation, corporate, multinational, global, Amazon, Google, Apple, Starbucks, BEPS, OECD, European Union, Adrian Sawyer, Facebook
Duration: 12'10"

09:50
Steve Almond - US correspondent
BODY:
United States presidential primaries. Trump University lawsuits.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: USA, United States
Duration: 9'27"

10:11
Young NZ doctor's innovations in medical information sharing
BODY:
Divya Dhar is a doctor and social justice campaigner and entrepreneur. Raised in Auckland, and attending medical school here, she is now based in San Francisco. Dr Dhar has spent the last four years in the US, where she has recently completed a dual Master of Business Administration (majoring in healthcare management) and a Master of Public Administration degree (majoring in business and government) at the Wharton School and Harvard Kennedy School. She is CEO and co-founder of Seratis, which has pioneered a care coordination mobile app for more efficient patient liason among healthcare providers. In 2010 Dr Dhar was named Young New Zealander of the Year and on Friday she will receive the young Alumna of the Year at the University of Auckland distinguished Alumni Awards.
EXTENDED BODY:
Divya Dhar is a doctor and social justice campaigner and entrepreneur. Raised in Auckland and attending medical school here, she is now based in San Francisco.
Kathryn Ryan talks with Divya about her passions and ambitions:

Dr Divya Dhar has spent the last four years in the US, where she has recently completed a dual Master of Business Administration (majoring in healthcare management) and a Master of Public Administration degree (majoring in business and government) at the Wharton School and Harvard Kennedy School. She is CEO and co-founder of Seratis, which has pioneered a care coordination mobile app for more efficient patient liason among healthcare providers. In 2010 Dr Dhar was named Young New Zealander of the Year and on Friday she will receive the young Alumna of the Year at the University of Auckland distinguished Alumni Awards.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Divya Dhar, Auckland University alumni, Seratis, medical information
Duration: 26'50"

10:38
Book review - Moranifesto by Caitlin Moran
BODY:
Reviewed by Phil Vine, published by Penguin Random House.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'53"

11:10
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
Fonterra business terms. Dairy prices. Recent company reporting results.
Topics: business, technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'01"

11:27
Growing New Zealand Bonsai trees
BODY:
Beverly Van has been growing bonsai trees for about 50 years. Now she's hoping to pass on some of that knowledge through a new book wrote with her late husband Alan: Bonsai Growing in New Zealand for the absolute beginner (and others). The art of growing miniature trees originated in China more than a thousand years ago and was spread to Japan by travelling monks. Since then it's become popular all around the world
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: bonsai, trees
Duration: 16'50"

11:44
Media commentator Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Gavin Ellis discusses the exit of top news boss Mark Jennings from Mediaworks and the 3D investigative journalists who've been picked up by Fairfax. Gavin Ellis is a media commentator and former editor of the New Zealand Herald. He can be contacted on gavin.ellis@xtra.co.nz
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'02"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Fonterra's milk forecast now in "Severe" scenario
Fonterra's latest forecast milk payout has just been released, positioning it squarely in line with the severe scenario painted by the Reserve Bank. The dairy cooperative has just announced it'll cut its payout per kilogram of milk solids from a forecast four dollars 15, to three dollars 90.
Fonterra has also told external suppliers they need to cut their charges by at least 10 percent....prompting claims the company is bullying small businesses and using them to cover their working capital shortfall.
Will Wilson is an agricultural consultant, company director and part owner and director of several dairy farms.
09:15 West Coast Mayors apply pressure on policing proposal
West Coast mayors are appealing to the Police Minister to step in and stop a plan to cut community constables and youth aid workers in the area. Police are proposing a major overhaul of policing in the West Coast police area that covers over 23 thousand square kilometres. If the plan goes ahead Westport, Greymouth and Hokitika will lose both their community constables and Youth Aid police. The remote centre of Karamea at the very top of the West Coast district (popn police area 560) will also lose its only constable. It's also proposed that Ross (popn 810) will lose its constable but there will be further consultation on that. The plan is that policing will be centralised at Greymouth - there will be one youth aid officer for the area and a tactical squad focussed on drug and gang crime that will employ three officers. All up, 8 jobs are being disestablished and 8 others will be created. West Coast Mayors have sent a letter to the Minister Judith Collins calling for a halt to the plan. The Mayor of Westland is Mike Havill and the Mayor of Buller is Mayor Garry Howard
09:30 Global corporate giants under increasing pressure to pay more tax
Facebook is the latest major corporate to bow to the increasing pressure mounting on multi-national companies to pay their fair share of tax. It will start paying tax on major advertisement revenue in the UK rather than Ireland. Google, Amazon and Apple are among other high profile companies that have been under fire for using loopholes in tax systems to avoid paying tax, by shifting profits to countries with low tax regimes.
The OECD estimates that multinationals' tax avoidance is worth between 100 and 240 billion US dollars annually. The European Union has recently come out with an Anti Tax Avoidance Package saying billions of euros are lost to public budgets every year. It follows the OECD's BEPS - Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project - which requires companies to disclose to tax authorities how much they are making and in which countries, so they can be properly taxed.So how are countries receiving these new rules? And will they mean big global corporates won't be able to shelter profits in low-or-no tax countries.
Adrian Sawyer is a Professor of Taxation at Canterbury University.
09:45 Steve Almond - US correspondent
[image:61068:third]
10:05 Young NZ doctor's innovations in medical information sharing
Divya Dhar is a doctor and social justice campaigner and entrepreneur. Raised in Auckland, and attending medical school here, she is now based in San Francisco. Dr Dhar has spent the last four years in the US, where she has recently completed a dual Master of Business Administration (majoring in healthcare management) and a Master of Public Administration degree (majoring in business and government) at the Wharton School and Harvard Kennedy School. She is CEO and co-founder of Seratis, which has pioneered a care coordination mobile app for more efficient patient liason among healthcare providers. In 2010 Dr Dhar was named Young New Zealander of the Year and on Friday she will receive the young Alumna of the Year at the University of Auckland distinguished Alumni Awards.
10:35 Book review
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
11:30 Growing New Zealand Bonsai trees
Beverly Van has been growing bonsai trees for about 50 years. Now she's hoping to pass on some of that knowledge through a new book wrote with her late husband Alan: Bonsai Growing in New Zealand for the absolute beginner (and others)
The art of growing miniature trees originated in China more than a thousand years ago and was spread to Japan by travelling monks.
Since then it's become popular all around the world
[gallery:1818]
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Bombay Bicycle Club
Song: Shuffle
Composer: Bombay Bicycle Club
Album: A Different Kind of Fix
Label: Universal
Time: 10:05
Artist: She and Him
Song: Gonna Get Along Without You Now
Composer: Kellem
Album: Volume Two
Label: Spunk
Time: 10:46

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
Bill English warns the decade old Holidays Act may be causing widespread payroll errors. Fonterra makes a second cut this year to its forecast dairy payout.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'08"

12:17
Economist on forecast payout drop
BODY:
Fonterra's cut its payout forecast for its 10.5 thousand farmer suppliers to $3.90 a kilo of milk solids which might rise to a maximum of $4.30 with added dividends.
Topics: business, rural, farming
Regions:
Tags: dairy, Fonterra
Duration: 2'05"

12:19
Truckometer perks up in February
BODY:
The ANZ Banks latest look at truck movements suggests the economy may have moved through its soft New Year start.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Truckometer
Duration: 1'05"

12:20
Manufacturing sales rise in December
BODY:
Manufacturing sales volumes rose in the December quarter, led my petroleum and coal.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 36"

12:22
Media landscape in Australia in for shake-up
BODY:
Media is in the spotlight for reform by policy makers at a time when broadcasters fight for advertising revenue.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 1'27"

12:23
Midday Markets for 8 March 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by James Malden of Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'53"

12:27
Midday Sports News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
The former tennis world number one Maria Sharapova has revealed she failed a drug test at the Australian Open and has been provisionally suspended from the sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'25"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 8 March 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'24"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Historic Ferry The Kestrel Sinks - Hugh Gladwell
BODY:
Historic Auckland ferry, The Kestrel, has sunk in its dock at Wynyard Wharf. The one hundred and eleven year old ferry, was one of the foundation vessels of ferry transport in Auckland. Hugh Gladwell is a member of The Kestrel Preservation Society.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: boats, Kestrel, ferries
Duration: 8'05"

13:22
Possible Zika-carrying Larvae - Dr Stewart Jessamine
BODY:
Biosecurity officials at Auckland Airport have found mosquito larvae of the type that can carry Zika. The Ministry of Health said staff found the larvae in a trap near the international baggage area on 3 March. Dr Stewart Jessamine is the acting director of public health.
Topics: health, security
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: biosecurity, zika virus
Duration: 7'31"

13:30
Guard Duty At The Featherston POW Camp - Ray Toomath
BODY:
Yesterday we spoke to David Hill, who's written a book about the former Japanese prisoner of war camp outside of Featherston, during World War 2. Ray Toomath was a guard at the real life POW camp, when a riot broke out in 1943, killing 48 Japanese prisoners of war and one guard.
EXTENDED BODY:
On 7 March, Jesse Mulligan spoke with David Hill, who's written a book about the former Japanese prisoner of war camp outside of Featherston where in 1943 a riot broke out, which allegedly resulted in the deaths of 48 Japanese POWs and one guard.
That night he got an email from Ray Toomath, who was a guard at the camp. He gives Jesse his version of events:
Topics: history
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: World War 2, Featherston
Duration: 10'27"

13:40
Treaty of Waitangi - Janneen Love
BODY:
A new exhibit on the Treaty of Waitangi is due to open on Thursday. It's simply called, Treaty of Waitangi, and it explores how the Treaty affects New Zealanders today. The late Maori academic, Dr Ranginui Walker, worked with the Auckland War Memorial Museum on the project. Exhibition developer Janneen Love is here to tell us more.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: te ao Maori, Treaty of Waitangi
Duration: 4'46"

13:45
Favourite Album - 20 Golden Greats by The Hollies
BODY:
20 Golden Greats - The Hollies.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'43"

14:08
New Zealand Festival - Lynn Freeman
BODY:
The New Zealand Festival's reaching its halfway mark and kiwi musicians are taking centre stage, from flying Nun bands the Chills and the Verlaines, to the Phoenix Foundation, Dame Kiwi te Kanawa and the Modern Maori Quartet. Standing Room Only's Lynn Freeman is reviewing the capital's biennial festival for RNZ.
Topics: arts, music
Regions:
Tags: NZ Festival, Flying Nun
Duration: 8'38"

14:18
Great NZ Concerts - The BeeGees (1998)
BODY:
Over 4 decades they sold 220 million albums and at one point in the 80s their combined income was believed to total 4% of the entire American music industry.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: BeeGees
Duration: 42'18"

15:08
Feature interview - Tom Wainwright
BODY:
If an industry pulls in $300 billion a year, it must be doing something right. And the industry investigated by the British editor for The Economist, Tom Wainwright has refined important business practices used by companies like Coca Cola and McDonalds to expand markets and maximize profit. It's the drug business, including legal highs that turned New Zealander Matt "Starboy" Bowden into a millionaire. Wainwright's new book is called Narconomics: How to Run a Drug Cartel
Topics: law, business, books, author interview
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'00"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 8 March 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'10"

21:06
Survival of the oldest
BODY:
Palaeontologists studying an ancient group of extinct marine plankton find surprising results about which species are vulnerable to extinction.
EXTENDED BODY:
Scientists studying an ancient group of marine plankton found that dramatic changes in climate and ocean currents can speed up the rate of extinctions and influence which species are more likely to die out.
Graptolites have been extinct for 400 million years. During their heydays, however, these intricate, tiny marine animals were so abundant throughout the world’s oceans that their signature in the geological record has been used to determine the boundaries between geological periods. Now, they have also revealed surprising information about extinctions.
The group as a whole thrived for 70 million years during a period when Earth moved from a warm ‘greenhouse’ world into an ‘icehouse’. Within this period, individual species of graptolite came and went, and their fossilised skeletons now act as geological signposts that help palaeontologists to date ancient rocks.
Because graptolites are so useful as a dating tool, they have been studied globally, with a focus on exactly when species appear in the geological record and then disappear again.
Roger Cooper, a palaeontologist at GNS Science, and James Crampton, also at GNS Science and Victoria University, have worked alongside American colleagues to collate a database of more than 2000 graptolite species and to develop sophisticated computational programmes to track their extinction rates. They have also matched the database against known changes in the climate – and they found that extinctions happen in short burst, separated by longer settled periods, and that they are influenced by large-scale environmental changes.
“The background pattern of extinction prevails right through the lifespan of this group,” says Roger Cooper. “But it is punctuated by climatic events that occurred during the Silurian, including a number of severe cold spikes during which the extinction rate shot up radically, many times the background value.”
One particularly extreme cold peak, at the end of the Ordovician period, is credited with causing a mass extinction and killing off 75 per cent of all species. The graptolites themselves were nearly wiped out.
It was also during these periods of dramatic change that different species became more prone to extinction.
James Crampton says one of the widespread, but disputed, ideas in biology is known as the Red Queen theory, which suggests that species have an equal probability to go extinct, no matter how long-lived they are. But the graptolites tell a very different story.
“This new data shows that most of the time, it’s the newly evolved species that are far more vulnerable to extinction. Nature is throwing out new species all the time, new things are evolving, new species are appearing, but actually they don’t cut the mustard."
“The species that have been around for a long time have already established themselves in the environment. They have a bigger geographic range, they have a bigger ecological footprint. It’s what’s called incumbency, they are the residents on the block, and they can outcompete the newly evolved species most of the time.”
Except when the climate changes rapidly, pushing well adapted, long-lived species out of their window of tolerance.
“Species will tolerate a certain level of climate variability. Within certain limits, the older species have the advantage, but once the environmental change passes a certain threshold, the whole extinction regime changes.”
He says the findings are relevant today and will add to the broader debate about the relative roles of environmental factors and species competition as drivers of biological diversity and extinctions.
“Plankton species are major players in the global ecosystem. They form the basis of the marine food chain and play an important role in sequestering carbon, drawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and locking it up. It’s important to understand how extinction works on a geological time scale.”
He says the findings suggest that “we can expect to see that different groups will become prone to extinction" as the climate and marine environment changes.
While it's too early to draw general conclusions, James Crampton says if he had to go out on a limb, he would say that extinction is more influenced by environmental factors while speciation is more driven by competition between species.
Topics: science, environment, climate
Regions:
Tags: extinction, graptolites, plankton, climate change, fossil record, extinction rates
Duration: 20'33"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:13 First Song
'A Love Song' - Ladyhawke.
1:15 Possible Zika-carrying Larvae - Dr Stewart Jessamine
Biosecurity officials at Auckland Airport have found mosquito larvae of the type that can carry Zika. The Ministry of Health said staff found the larvae in a trap near the international baggage area on 3 March. Dr Stewart Jessamine is the acting director of public health.
1:20 Historic Ferry The Kestrel Sinks - Hugh Gladwell
Historic Auckland ferry, The Kestrel, has sunk in its dock at Wynyard Wharf. The 111 year old ferry, was one of the foundation vessels of ferry transport in Auckland. Hugh Gladwell is a member of the Kestrel Preservation Society.
1.30 Guard Duty At The Featherston POW Camp - Ray Toomath
Yesterday we spoke to David Hill, who's written a book about the former Japanese prisoner of war camp outside of Featherston, during World War 2. Ray Toomath was a guard at the real life POW camp, when a riot broke out in 1943, killing 48 Japanese prisoners of war and one guard.
1:40 Treaty of Waitangi - Janneen Love
A new exhibit on the Treaty of Waitangi is due to open on Thursday. It's simply called, Treaty of Waitangi, and it explores how the Treaty affects New Zealanders today. The late Maori academic, Dr Ranginui Walker, worked with the Auckland War Memorial Museum on the project. Exhibition developer Janneen Love is here to tell us more.
1:45 Favourite Album
20 Golden Greats - The Hollies.
2:10 Festival Report - Lynn Freeman
Our arts correspondent provides an update on the Wellington-based New Zealand Festival.
2:20 Great NZ Concerts - The BeeGees (1999)
Over 4 decades they sold 220 million albums and at one point in the 80s their combined income was believed to total 4% of the entire American music industry. Today we are feature the BeeGees New Zealand concerts of 1998.
3:10 Feature Interview - Tom Wainwright
If an industry pulls in $300 billion a year, it must be doing something right. And the industry investigated by the British editor for The Economist, Tom Wainwright has refined important business practices used by companies like Coca Cola and McDonalds to expand markets and maximize profit. It's the drug business, including legal highs that turned New Zealander Matt "Starboy" Bowden into a millionaire. Wainwright's new book is called Narconomics: How to Run a Drug Cartel.
3:30 Our Changing World
Palaeontologists from Victoria University and GNS Science have for the first time determined how and when more than 2000 species of an ancient group of marine plankton became extinct. They found that the extinction rate of these species was largely influenced by global changes in climate and the ocean's temperature and circulation patterns. Veronika Meduna meets the team to see some of the fossils and to hear how these findings can help them to predict which current species may be most vulnerable to rapid climate change.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE'S SONG:

ARTIST: Ladyhawke
SONG: A Love Song
COMP: Brown
ALBUM: Unreleased
LABEL: Sound Cloud

FEATURE ALBUM:

ARTIST: The Hollies
TITLE: Bus Stop
COMP: Graham Gouldman
ALBUM: The Hollies - 20 Golden Greats
LABEL: Parlophone

ARTIST: The Hollies
TITLE: Look Through Any Window
COMP: Graham Gouldman, Charles Silverman
ALBUM: The Hollies - 20 Golden Greats
LABEL: Parlophone

ARTIST: The Hollies
TITLE: He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother
COMP: Bob Russell, Bobby Scott
ALBUM: The Hollies - 20 Golden Greats
LABEL: Parlophone

GREAT NEW ZEALAND CONCERT:

ARTIST: The Bee Gees
TITLE: Night Fever / More Than a Woman
COMP: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
ALBUM: One Night Only
LABEL: RSO

ARTIST: The Bee Gees
TITLE: Jive Talkin'
COMP: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
ALBUM: One Night Only
LABEL: RSO

ARTIST: The Bee Gees
TITLE: Nights on Broadway
COMP: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
ALBUM: One Night Only
LABEL: RSO

ARTIST: The Bee Gees
TITLE: How Can You Mend A Broken Heart
COMP: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
ALBUM: One Night Only
LABEL: RSO

ARTIST: The Bee Gees
TITLE: Heartbreaker
COMP: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
ALBUM: One Night Only
LABEL: RSO

ARTIST: The Bee Gees
TITLE: You Should Be Dancing
COMP: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
ALBUM: One Night Only
LABEL: RSO

ADDITIONAL SONG:

ARTIST: Tim Guy
TITLE: Electric Heart
COMP: Tim Guy
ALBUM: Chords
LABEL: Private

PANEL - HALF TIME SONG:

ARTIST: Sandy Posey
TITLE: Born A Woman
COMP: Martha Sharpe
ALBUM: Born A Woman
LABEL: MGM

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 8 March 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'10"

16:06
The Panel with Mark Inglis and Tainui Stephens (Part 1)
BODY:
Intro. Mark Inglis marooned by Hanmer fire. Discovery of potentially Zika-bearing mosquitoes in Auckland. Flag referendum. Rise in possible terrorism funding from New Zealand.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'26"

16:07
The Panel with Mark Inglis and Tainui Stephens (Part 2)
BODY:
International Women's Day. Panel Says. French au pair deported. Victoria chancellor doesn't see the funny side. Maria Sharapova fails drug test.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'17"

16:08
Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Mark Inglis and Tainui Stephens have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'52"

16:15
Mark Inglis marooned by Hanmer fire
BODY:
Today's Panelist Mark Inglis is also a resident of Hanmer Springs. He talks to us about the bush fire and also the news that the Alpine fault runs through his section.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hanmer Springs
Duration: 3'29"

16:18
Discovery of potentially Zika-bearing mosquitoes in Auckland
BODY:
Dr Jose Derraik discusses the discovery of potentially Zika-bearing mosquitoes at Auckland Airport.
Topics: health, security
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: zika virus
Duration: 3'55"

16:23
Flag referendum
BODY:
The bright side of the flag vote.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Flag
Duration: 4'59"

16:28
Rise in possible terrorism funding from New Zealand
BODY:
Al Gillespie talks about the rise in possible terrorism funding from New Zealand.
Topics: security
Regions:
Tags: terrorism
Duration: 5'11"

16:35
International Women's Day
BODY:
The male view on International Women's Day.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: equality
Duration: 7'08"

16:40
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Mark Inglis and Tainui Stephens have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'39"

16:48
French au pair deported
BODY:
Nicole Kofkin the spokesperson for the Australian Au Pair Association discusses the Customs trouble French au pair Manon Pache faced at Queenstown Airport.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 6'39"

16:55
Victoria chancellor doesn't see the funny side
BODY:
Sir Neville Jordan is upset over a satirical piece about him in Salient magazine.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'14"

16:57
Maria Sharapova fails drug test
BODY:
Tennis star Maria Sharapova has admitted she failed a drug test at the Sustralian Open.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: tennis, banned substances
Duration: 3'33"

17:17
Government accused of covering up financial mismanagement
BODY:
The Government has been accused of trying to cover up financial mismanagement at the Ministry of Health. Demelza Leslie reports.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'49"

17:20
No injuries at Hanmer blaze - a lucky escape
BODY:
One of the 28 people evacuated last night because of a major scrub fire near Hanmer Springs says the blaze came extremely close to homes and it's lucky nobody was hurt.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hanmer springs fire
Duration: 7'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 8th March 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here. It starts five minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:10
Injured student speaks out about Six60 concert
BODY:
A Fine Arts student at Otago Polytechnic who suffered two broken legs and a broken back after a balcony collapsed at the Six60 concert has spoken out about his experience.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Six60
Duration: 3'31"

17:14
Fonterra cuts payout, dairy debt balloons
BODY:
As dairy debt balloons, Fonterra, who - in May of last year - said "We can expect prices to recover going forward", today cut their forecast payout for milk solids by 25 cents a kilo.
Topics: farming, economy
Regions:
Tags: dairy, Fonterra
Duration: 3'17"

17:20
No injuries at Hanmer blaze - a lucky escape
BODY:
One of the 28 people evacuated last night because of a major scrub fire near Hanmer Springs says the blaze came extremely close to homes and it's lucky nobody was hurt.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hanmer springs fire
Duration: 7'17"

17:27
Jury retires to consider Tully verdict
BODY:
The jury in the high court trial of Russell Tully has retired to consider if the accused is guilty of two counts of murder, but has reached no verdicts today.
Topics: law, crime
Regions: Canterbury
Tags:
Duration: 3'19"

17:34
Sharapova fails Australian open drug test
BODY:
The sporting world was shocked today by the news former tennis world number one Maria Sharapova failed a drug test at the Australian Open in January.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: tennis, performance enhancing drugs
Duration: 1'53"

17:37
Moldonium under consideration since 2015, says ASDA former exec
BODY:
Richard Ings, the former Chief Executive for the Australian Sports Anti-doping Authority, says Sharapova had a responsibility to remain aware of which drugs were banned. He joins Checkpoint.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: tennis, performance enhancing drugs
Duration: 3'03"

17:44
Strangulation recommended to be specific crime
BODY:
The Justice Minister is backing a Law Commission recommendation that non-fatal strangulation should become a specific crime.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'53"

17:45
Evening business for 8 March 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'43"

17:48
Finance Minister raises prospect of widespread payroll problems
BODY:
Thousands of workers at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment may have been underpaid for decades. Jane Patterson reports.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: employment
Duration: 2'15"

17:51
MH370 passengers' families say no closure, two years on
BODY:
The families of passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH-370 say they're no closer to getting answers, two years after the plane disappeared.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: MH-370
Duration: 2'54"

17:53
Shooting shocks Seacliff residents
BODY:
A shooting has shocked residents of the small Otago village of Seacliff, where a woman was found dead at her home and a man seriously injured.
Topics: crime
Regions: Otago
Tags:
Duration: 1'23"

17:55
Recommended egg intake up to six a week
BODY:
The Heart Foundation has doubled the recommended limit of eggs people with increased risk of heart disease can crack into.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Heart Foundation
Duration: 2'39"

18:09
National dairy debt at 'crisis point'
BODY:
New Zealand's dairy debt has reached $37.8 billion - a level one farming consultant is describing as a crisis point. Janette Walker joins Checkpoint.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags: dairy
Duration: 5'04"

18:15
Injured Dunedin student tells RNZ about Six60 concert
BODY:
One of the students seriously injured when a balcony collapsed at the Six 60 concert in Dunedin on Friday night has spoken of his injuries.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags:
Duration: 3'16"

18:17
Protection of Kermadec ocean proposed
BODY:
The Government wants to establish one of the world's largest fully protected ocean areas - the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary in New Zealand's Exclusive Economic Zone.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Kermadec Ocean
Duration: 3'04"

18:20
Kiwi working with refugees on Greek-Macedonian border
BODY:
29-year-old Christchurch woman Anna McPhee is on the ground in Greece helping with refugees who have recently arrived from Syria.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: asylum seekers
Duration: 5'46"

18:26
Iconic Kestrel ferry sinks in Auckland wharf
BODY:
Decades of lobbying and restoration sank into the Auckland harbour overnight along with the Kestrel.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: ferry, The Kestrel
Duration: 3'02"

18:55
Today In Parliament for 8 March 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Labour scores a big hit by winning a snap debate on its exposure of financial mismanagement of the Health MInistry's refurbishment of its Wellington head office. Health Minister, Jonathan Coleman, is roundly condemned by all opposition parties for his political and personal attacks in the debate.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'12"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - World Family Trip
BODY:
an update from Kiwi Dave Monk as he and his family, wife Rachel and sons Dylan, and Lewis, keep on with their travels around the globe - currently travelling through Spain, the Monk family recently went for a cycle tour of Morocco...
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: travel, Morocco, Spain, Cycle Tour
Duration: 17'49"

20:42
Nights Pundit - NZ History
BODY:
a lucky guy whose job is also his hobby, Gavin McLean is a senior historian for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage... it's our 30th anniversary of homosexual law reform...
Topics: history, life and society, identity
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand history, homosexual law reform, homosexuality
Duration: 14'17"

20:59
Conundrum Clue 3 for Tuesday 8 March
BODY:
Conundrum clue 3 for Tuesday 8 March
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20"

21:59
Conundrum Clue four Tuesday 8 March
BODY:
Conundrum Clue four Tuesday 8 March
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 34"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Our Own Odysseys - World Family Trip pt 3
an update from Kiwi Dave Monk as he and his family, wife Rachel and sons Dylan, and Lewis, keep on with their travels around the globe - currently travelling through Spain, the Monk family recently went for a cycle tour of Morocco...
[image:61625:full]
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

12:00
Harmony House by Dave Dobbyn
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn.
It’s nearly eight years since the last new album from Dave Dobbyn, though somehow it doesn’t seem that long. When your songs have become such a part of the landscape then you are a constant presence, whether you are releasing new music or not. Still a fresh set of Dobbyn songs is welcome, and a chance to find out how that landscape is looking through the eyes of a master songwriter.
The scene he surveys is both a fresh and a familiar one. In the opening song, ‘Waiting for a Voice’, he describes what might be a dream or a vision, reporting it in heightened, telescopic detail. He sees the veins on distant leaves and a figure preparing a meal on an opposite shore. The figure turns out to be Elijah, the Old Testament prophet, with the message that heaven is waiting for the singer to make a choice. The effect is at once ecstatic and apocalyptic, as licks of South Seas steel guitar are swept away in an ominous storm of sound.
The Biblical stuff is, of course, nothing new for Dave; it’s been a rich source of metaphor and a thread that’s run through his writing, at least as far back as Hopetown. Musically, though, there are some new colours, thanks to Dobbyn’s latest collaborators, Sam Scott and Luke Buda of The Phoenix Foundation. They produced Harmony House, played much of the music on it, and even co-wrote a few of the songs. And there’s a distinctly Phoenix-y quality about the intricate textures. The title song, with its modal melody and motoric groove, could just about slip unnoticed onto a recent Phoenix Foundation album.
But the dominant personality in all this remains Dobbyn’s and he seems to have two major preoccupations here. The first is a kind of striving for transcendence. The other is love - and love songs make up some of the most powerful material on Harmony House.
‘Tell The World’ - with Phoenix-y ‘oo-oo’s and one of those giant choruses Dave Dobbyn just seems to pluck out of the air - takes its place alongside ‘Loyal’ and ‘Slice Of Heaven’ as another of his great love anthems. But the album’s finest moment – at least in terms of pure songwriting - might be ‘Burning Love’. Again, it’s a love song, and it refreshes the timeless theme with a casual brilliance that reminds me of Paul McCartney, while Scott and Buda know enough to keep out of the way here and just let Dobbyn do what he does so well.
Songs played: Waiting For A Voice, One Summer Storm, Ball Of Light, Angelina, Burning Love, Harmony House, Tell The World, Singing Through The Storm, Submarine Blue.
Harmony House is available on Red Trolley Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Dave Dobbyn, music review
Duration: 11'49"

10:15
The Sampler for Tuesday, 8 March 2016
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn; the retro-soul of Boston’s Lake Street Dive; and classical-folk fusion of Bristol’s Spiro.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn; the retro-soul of Boston’s Lake Street Dive; and classical-folk fusion of Bristol’s Spiro.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Dave Dobbyn, Lake Street Drive, Spiro, music review
Duration: 29'50"

12:00
Welcome Joy And Welcome Sorrow by Spiro
BODY:
Nick Bollinger revels in the classical-folk fusion of Bristol's Spiro.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger revels in the classical-folk fusion of Bristol's Spiro.
Spiro is a quartet from Bristol, England, who are due to visit New Zealand this month to play at WOMAD, and in their music the classical and folk elements are so fused that it is hard to identify which starts where. To unpick it a little, accordionist Jason Sparkes and violinist Jane Harbour both come from a classical background, while guitarist Jon Hunt and mandolin player Alex Vann have histories in folk and punk rock, respectively. But together they make a unique quartet: skilled and disciplined and sonically full of surprises.
The playing is as tight and disciplined and meticulously arranged as a classical quartet. Yet folk rhythms and melodies, such as you might encounter in far looser and more raucous settings, are threaded through the album.
The album is full of lovely, folkish themes, but there is also a strong modernist element to Spiro, which seems to have grown out of the more cerebral end of 20th century music. I hear echoes of Steve Reich and Philip Glass, or a later exponent of minimalist style, Michael Nyman.
At other times they show the influence of contemporary electronica. In fact, one of Spiro’s Real World releases has been an album of remixes by Portishead’s Adrian Utley. But though the instrumentation on this album is entirely acoustic, there are times when the tones and techniques conspire to make something that could almost be electronic.
Spiro’s music is entirely instrumental, which leaves you free to conjure your own narratives. But the group clearly have their notions of what these pieces are about. The album’s title Welcome Joy and Welcome Sorrow is borrowed from the poet Keats, and it’s not the only place where they nod to the great British poets. This tune takes its title from a Ted Hughes poem, ‘The Though Fox’, and with its delicate paw-prints of mandolin and violin, it evokes Hughes’s imaginary animal stepping onto the blank page.
Songs played: I Am The Blaze On Every Hill, One Train May Hide Another, Thought Fox, Will You Go Walk In The Woods So Wild, Burning Bridge
Welcome Joy And Welcome Sorrow is available on Real World
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Spiro
Duration: 10'47"

19:30
Side Pony by Lake Street Dive
BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the retro-soul of Boston's Lake Street Dive.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the retro-soul of Boston's Lake Street Dive.
When this band from Boston turned up last year – to play at the Auckland Arts Festival and Womad – they made a strong impression, though few had heard of them before. It was evident that here was a band who had already put in their ten thousand hours.
They are a four piece – drums, guitar, vocals and double bass, two men, two women – all of whom first met as students at the New England Conservatory Of Music. While they were there they honed their jazz chops but out in the world, they have directed those chops mostly at different R&B styles. ‘Godawful Things’, which opens the album, could be some 60s Motown single, while ‘Call Off Your Dogs’ might have come from Philadelphia in the disco 70s.
It makes a certain sense that Lake Street Dive find their comfort zone in these retro styles, which dominate their new album Side Pony. Back in the golden age of soul, a lot of the session musicians – at studios like Philly International or Motown – came from jazz backgrounds. The songs may have been simple but the playing was sophisticated and slick. And this music could be described in much the same way: soulful pop with a virtuoso accent.
All four members write individually, with singer/frontwoman Rachel Price contributing just one of the twelve songs in this set. That leaves Price in a position of having to inhabit whatever personas and scenarios the other members create for her. And while Price seems capable of wrapping her supple, soulful voice around just about anything, some of the songs are more worthy than others of the emotion she expends on them. The most soulful performance for me is ‘Mistakes’: one of the more low-key and, perhaps tellingly, it’s the one song Price wrote herself.
There’s at least one other lovey ballad here, ‘So Long’, by bass player Bridget Kearney. To my mind she’s the group’s most consistent writer, and was responsible for the great title tune of their last album ‘Bad Self Portraits.’ There’s a depth to her songs that can be lacking in some of the other material, which can seem a bit like pastiche.
While the musicianship perhaps outstrips the originality, there is plenty here to be entertained by.
Songs played: : Godawful Things, Spectacular Failure, Call Off Your Dogs, Saving All My Sinning, Mistakes
Side Pony is available on Nonesuch
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Lake Street Drive, music, music reviews
Duration: 7'16"

7:30 The Sampler
music album reviews & music discussion with Nick Bollinger
8:12 Window on the World - The Boda-Boda Boom pt 2 of 2
international public radio documentaries
8:43 Nights' Pundit - NZ History
a lucky guy whose job is also his hobby, Gavin McLean is a senior historian for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage... it's our 30th anniversary of homosexual law reform...
[image:61628:third]

pundit roster: Economics, Philosophy, Right Thinking, Military History, Feminism, Left Thinking, Mathematics, NZ History, Religion & Kai A Miro (Maori Issues)

8:59 conundrum clue 3
9:07 Tuesday Feature - The Truth About Diabetes Debate
9:59 conundrum clue 4
10:17 Late Edition
a round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour - The Shed
music from a myriad of cultures
... nights' time is the right time...

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

12:00
Harmony House by Dave Dobbyn
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn.
It’s nearly eight years since the last new album from Dave Dobbyn, though somehow it doesn’t seem that long. When your songs have become such a part of the landscape then you are a constant presence, whether you are releasing new music or not. Still a fresh set of Dobbyn songs is welcome, and a chance to find out how that landscape is looking through the eyes of a master songwriter.
The scene he surveys is both a fresh and a familiar one. In the opening song, ‘Waiting for a Voice’, he describes what might be a dream or a vision, reporting it in heightened, telescopic detail. He sees the veins on distant leaves and a figure preparing a meal on an opposite shore. The figure turns out to be Elijah, the Old Testament prophet, with the message that heaven is waiting for the singer to make a choice. The effect is at once ecstatic and apocalyptic, as licks of South Seas steel guitar are swept away in an ominous storm of sound.
The Biblical stuff is, of course, nothing new for Dave; it’s been a rich source of metaphor and a thread that’s run through his writing, at least as far back as Hopetown. Musically, though, there are some new colours, thanks to Dobbyn’s latest collaborators, Sam Scott and Luke Buda of The Phoenix Foundation. They produced Harmony House, played much of the music on it, and even co-wrote a few of the songs. And there’s a distinctly Phoenix-y quality about the intricate textures. The title song, with its modal melody and motoric groove, could just about slip unnoticed onto a recent Phoenix Foundation album.
But the dominant personality in all this remains Dobbyn’s and he seems to have two major preoccupations here. The first is a kind of striving for transcendence. The other is love - and love songs make up some of the most powerful material on Harmony House.
‘Tell The World’ - with Phoenix-y ‘oo-oo’s and one of those giant choruses Dave Dobbyn just seems to pluck out of the air - takes its place alongside ‘Loyal’ and ‘Slice Of Heaven’ as another of his great love anthems. But the album’s finest moment – at least in terms of pure songwriting - might be ‘Burning Love’. Again, it’s a love song, and it refreshes the timeless theme with a casual brilliance that reminds me of Paul McCartney, while Scott and Buda know enough to keep out of the way here and just let Dobbyn do what he does so well.
Songs played: Waiting For A Voice, One Summer Storm, Ball Of Light, Angelina, Burning Love, Harmony House, Tell The World, Singing Through The Storm, Submarine Blue.
Harmony House is available on Red Trolley Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Dave Dobbyn, music review
Duration: 11'49"

10:15
The Sampler for Tuesday, 8 March 2016
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn; the retro-soul of Boston’s Lake Street Dive; and classical-folk fusion of Bristol’s Spiro.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the first album in eight years from Dave Dobbyn; the retro-soul of Boston’s Lake Street Dive; and classical-folk fusion of Bristol’s Spiro.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Dave Dobbyn, Lake Street Drive, Spiro, music review
Duration: 29'50"

12:00
Welcome Joy And Welcome Sorrow by Spiro
BODY:
Nick Bollinger revels in the classical-folk fusion of Bristol's Spiro.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger revels in the classical-folk fusion of Bristol's Spiro.
Spiro is a quartet from Bristol, England, who are due to visit New Zealand this month to play at WOMAD, and in their music the classical and folk elements are so fused that it is hard to identify which starts where. To unpick it a little, accordionist Jason Sparkes and violinist Jane Harbour both come from a classical background, while guitarist Jon Hunt and mandolin player Alex Vann have histories in folk and punk rock, respectively. But together they make a unique quartet: skilled and disciplined and sonically full of surprises.
The playing is as tight and disciplined and meticulously arranged as a classical quartet. Yet folk rhythms and melodies, such as you might encounter in far looser and more raucous settings, are threaded through the album.
The album is full of lovely, folkish themes, but there is also a strong modernist element to Spiro, which seems to have grown out of the more cerebral end of 20th century music. I hear echoes of Steve Reich and Philip Glass, or a later exponent of minimalist style, Michael Nyman.
At other times they show the influence of contemporary electronica. In fact, one of Spiro’s Real World releases has been an album of remixes by Portishead’s Adrian Utley. But though the instrumentation on this album is entirely acoustic, there are times when the tones and techniques conspire to make something that could almost be electronic.
Spiro’s music is entirely instrumental, which leaves you free to conjure your own narratives. But the group clearly have their notions of what these pieces are about. The album’s title Welcome Joy and Welcome Sorrow is borrowed from the poet Keats, and it’s not the only place where they nod to the great British poets. This tune takes its title from a Ted Hughes poem, ‘The Though Fox’, and with its delicate paw-prints of mandolin and violin, it evokes Hughes’s imaginary animal stepping onto the blank page.
Songs played: I Am The Blaze On Every Hill, One Train May Hide Another, Thought Fox, Will You Go Walk In The Woods So Wild, Burning Bridge
Welcome Joy And Welcome Sorrow is available on Real World
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Spiro
Duration: 10'47"

19:30
Side Pony by Lake Street Dive
BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the retro-soul of Boston's Lake Street Dive.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the retro-soul of Boston's Lake Street Dive.
When this band from Boston turned up last year – to play at the Auckland Arts Festival and Womad – they made a strong impression, though few had heard of them before. It was evident that here was a band who had already put in their ten thousand hours.
They are a four piece – drums, guitar, vocals and double bass, two men, two women – all of whom first met as students at the New England Conservatory Of Music. While they were there they honed their jazz chops but out in the world, they have directed those chops mostly at different R&B styles. ‘Godawful Things’, which opens the album, could be some 60s Motown single, while ‘Call Off Your Dogs’ might have come from Philadelphia in the disco 70s.
It makes a certain sense that Lake Street Dive find their comfort zone in these retro styles, which dominate their new album Side Pony. Back in the golden age of soul, a lot of the session musicians – at studios like Philly International or Motown – came from jazz backgrounds. The songs may have been simple but the playing was sophisticated and slick. And this music could be described in much the same way: soulful pop with a virtuoso accent.
All four members write individually, with singer/frontwoman Rachel Price contributing just one of the twelve songs in this set. That leaves Price in a position of having to inhabit whatever personas and scenarios the other members create for her. And while Price seems capable of wrapping her supple, soulful voice around just about anything, some of the songs are more worthy than others of the emotion she expends on them. The most soulful performance for me is ‘Mistakes’: one of the more low-key and, perhaps tellingly, it’s the one song Price wrote herself.
There’s at least one other lovey ballad here, ‘So Long’, by bass player Bridget Kearney. To my mind she’s the group’s most consistent writer, and was responsible for the great title tune of their last album ‘Bad Self Portraits.’ There’s a depth to her songs that can be lacking in some of the other material, which can seem a bit like pastiche.
While the musicianship perhaps outstrips the originality, there is plenty here to be entertained by.
Songs played: : Godawful Things, Spectacular Failure, Call Off Your Dogs, Saving All My Sinning, Mistakes
Side Pony is available on Nonesuch
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Lake Street Drive, music, music reviews
Duration: 7'16"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:13 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

The Truth About Diabetes
A BBC World Service discussion on one of the world’s most complex and devastating food issues: diabetes. Presenter Anu Anand is joined by a panel of experts, food industry players and campaigners as they respond live to questions brought up by the documentaries and beyond. (BBC)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Award winning former British broadcaster Mark Coles presents his pick of the best new music releases and demos from around the planet. A glorious mix of brand new sounds from all over the world, real conversations with music makers and tales of everyday life as seen from an English garden shed (11 of 13, MCM)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288150

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 08 Mar 2016

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