RNZ National. 2016-08-14. 00:00-23:59.

Find out more about this item:
Message us

Rights Information

A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

14 August 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Te Wherowhero by Pei Te Hurunui Jones (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 1:45 Go Ahead Caller (RNZ) 2:05 Heart and Soul (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday; 3:05 The Stove Rake, by Denise Keay, read by Tandi Wright (RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBCWS); 5:10 Mihipeka: Time of Turmoil by Mihipeka Edwards (8 of 14, RNZ)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Don't Use your Head, by David Hill, told by Michael Wilson; A Magic Stillness, by Mere Whaanga, told by Donna Muir; Hinu Please, by Donna Rapira, told by Tina Cook; Jellybean, by Tessa Duder, told by Helen Jones; A Pig in the Room, by Victor Rodger, told by Victor Rodger; Robber and the Millionaire, by Eirlys Hunter, told by Jonathan Hardy

===7:10 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, politics from the insiders, plus Mediawatch, the week in Parliament and music 7:43 The Week in Parliament An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house 8:10 Insight An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs 9:06 Mediawatch Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in New Zealand's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:08
Peter Mares - Not Quite Australian
BODY:
Temporary migration is redefining Australian society. Peter Mares says there are around one million 'unsettled settlers' - including thousands of New Zealanders - on various kinds of temporary visas in Australia, and many are being unfairly treated. Peter Mares is a writer, researcher and a former ABC journalist, with a longstanding interest in migration issues. He joins Colin to discuss his new book, Not Quite Australian.
Topics: politics, refugees and migrants, author interview, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australian immigration policies, Australia, migration, Peter Mares
Duration: 22'00"

07:30
The Week In Parliament for 14 August 2016
BODY:
Committee Stage of the Government's budget passes on Tuesday, with its third and final reading kicked off by Finance Minister Bill English on Thursday; Members' Day sees David Parker's Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill pass its second reading by 61 votes to 60 - the same margin that sees Mark Mitchell's Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill pass its first reading; Andrew Little's Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill is the subject of questions in the chamber and submissions in the committee rooms; Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler fronts up to the Finance and Expenditure Committee to explain his decision to cut the Official Cash Rate to 2.0% - a move that elicits questions about interests rates, housing and immigration for the Finance Minister; A tax bill addressing tax havens passes its first reading; Law and Order Committee begins inquiry into illegal firearms; Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee hears submissions on the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement Bill; Health Committee announces it has received more than 21,000 submissions on a petition on euthanasia - with 1800 of those due to be heard in person; Conservation Minister Maggie Barry forced to withdraw and apologise for comments about a New Zealand First MP.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'12"

07:47
Report from Rio
BODY:
Senior RNZ sports reporter Barry Guy team joins Colin with the latest from the Olympic Games.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio Olympic Games 2016
Duration: 10'37"

08:12
Insight: Labour-Hire Companies - Exploitation or Opportunity?
BODY:
Teresa Cowie explores the expanding labour hire sector amid accusations that some workers are being exploited.
EXTENDED BODY:
Zero hour contracts are now illegal but some fear new ways of taking advantage of workers are taking their place.
The insecure contracts were outlawed in March but, according to unions and some low-paid workers, businesses looking to cut costs and reduce commitments are now doing so by hiring staff at arms-length - via temping agencies or labour-hire companies.
Pass through somewhere like Auckland International Airport and you'll see them everywhere, but probably not notice: labour-hire contractors, working for the various companies that keep this transport hub for this country's largest city moving.
As I waited to get off a plane in the early hours of a damp winter's morning, workers were buzzing around the tarmac delivering airline meals from flight kitchen to aircraft. And, wheeling my suitcase through to to be X-rayed, workers at all three conveyor belts were wearing polar fleeces with company logos - not those of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), but of labour-hire agency Adecco.
Some of those temporary workers might be filling in here and there, covering someone's sick day or be grateful to get a foot in the door of an industry they want a permanent job in.
But MPI said some of its roles, including those of safety officers, who assist X-ray machine operators at airports by lifting baggage onto conveyor belts and opening them for inspection, were carried out only by labour-hire workers.
The ministry said that was because it was cheaper to employ contractors on an as-needed basis to do the work.
But unions are concerned that casual contracts that stretch on into years are becoming more common, and they are being used to exploit low-paid workers, many of whom are immigrants.
By not having workers as permanent staff businesses can save on some sick leave, overtime payments and pension savings. They can also cut risks; as business fluctuates, they can stop employment with no questions asked, even if people have been working for them for years.
Shopan Dasgupta, an organiser for E Tū's hospital and flight-kitchen members in Auckland, said labour-hire companies had gone from providing genuine temporary job opportunities to providing an opportunity for companies to exploit workers by distancing themselves from their responsibilities to provide, fair, safe and secure work.
"We want to prove that they are actually your employees, and you cannot fob them off as and when you wish," he said.
He is currently dealing with a case involving several workers who took up roles in catering and transport for LSG Sky Chefs via labour-hire company Solutions Personnel, also now operating under company name Blue Collar.
Sky Chefs, which makes in-flight meals, is part of German airline Lufthansa, and one of its former agency workers, Kamlesh Prasad, is taking a case to the Employment Court claiming the company was his employer.
As a new migrant to New Zealand from Fiji, with little knowledge of how employment in this country worked, he felt he was duped by LSG Sky Chefs and its labour-hire company into signing himself up as an individual contractor, when he thought he was actually working via the labour-hire company.
"They pay me $18 per hour, no holiday and no sick pay, nothing like that. If I asked LSG to pay they just say 'you are a contractor so you just go and talk to your agency'."
Out of his $18 per hour pay packet, Mr Prasad had to pay for his own safety boots and some equipment, and about $960 for his annual ACC levies. He even had to pay his agency a dollar to get a copy of his payslip sent to him, he said.
Labour Inspectorate general manager George Mason said that sounded unlawful.
"The Labour Inspectorate clearly could investigate that and take enforcement action. Employers are required to provide records to their employees as of right - there's no provision for charging for that kind of information."
Solutions Personnel, now Blue Collar, did not respond to Insight's request for an interview.
LSG Sky Chefs declined to be interviewed but said in a statement:
"LSG Sky Chefs is an ethical employer that meets its legal obligations in its use of labour supply. It is committed to ensuring that it complies with all legal obligations for its employees, contractors and service providers.
"To meet demand, LSG Sky Chefs, like many other New Zealand businesses and service industries, utilises casual labour hire, supplied by external service providers, so it can continue to deliver a consistent and seamless service to all its customers.
"LSG Sky Chefs values its workforce including its temporary labour hire. Its preferred supplier agreement provides for benefits like sick leave and KiwiSaver contribution.
"As Mr Prasad's case is currently before the court, it is unable to comment on this any further."
Simon Bennett, the chief executive of AWF Madison, which owns labour-hire company Allied Workforce, said the valuable role labour-hire companies played in getting people work-ready was too often ignored.
"The reality is, there are kids out of school, there are young people who are new to the country that have perhaps done study but need a chance - and not all employers, despite the 90-day [trial] rule, will take the risk on new starters with no experience."
But Labour workplace relations and safety spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway believes temping contracts are being abused.
"Some [businesses] are extending it into something it was never meant to be when temping agencies were first set up, and using it to make the employee carry all the risk of business. And in that way it's not unlike the zero hours contracts," he said.
Workplace Relations Minister Michael Woodhouse declined Insight's request for an interview about labour-hire companies.
A spokesperson from his office said the minister felt it wasn't appropriate to comment on the unfairness of unwanted long-term casual contracts because they were not illegal.
Temporary workers who feel they are being exploited can call the Labour Inspectorate at the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment on 0800 20 90 20.
Follow Insight on Twitter
Topics: business, economy, politics, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: labour hire companies, unions
Duration: 26'57"

08:40
Chris Zeiher - Epic Bike Rides
BODY:
Travel guide publisher Lonely Planet has just released Epic Bike Rides of the World - detailing routes as strenuous and exotic as the Tour d'Afrique from Cairo to Cape Town, to a far less punishing trip around the craft breweries of Colorado. The book, which also features a couple of rides in New Zealand, was edited by Chris Zeiher.
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: cycling, Lonely Planet, Epic Bike Rides of the World, Chris Zeiher
Duration: 15'26"

09:08
Mediawatch for 14 August 2016
BODY:
OlympicWatch - reporting Rio as a place of peril; independent papers resist a mega-merger in publishing; the curse of cancerous cliches.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 35'32"

09:40
Tim Vickery - Politics and Sport in Brazil
BODY:
While the Olympic Games rock on, Brazil has also got pressing political and economic problems on its plate right now. Rio state is broke and the country's senate has voted to hold an impeachment trial for suspended president Dilma Rousseff, who is accused of breaking the budget law. Are the games a welcome distraction - or a hassle the citizens of Brazil could do without? Tim Vickery is a British sports journalist and Brazilian football expert who has lived in Rio de Janeiro for more than 20 years.
Topics: politics, sport, economy
Regions:
Tags: Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, Tim Vickery, Rio Olympics 2016
Duration: 21'55"

10:06
Lily Hirsch on music, crime and punishment
BODY:
Musicologist Lily Hirsch talks to Colin Peacock about her book, Music in American Crime Prevention and Punishment. We canvas how Barry Manilow keeps kids from loitering; How Enya can sway a jury and why Britney Spears can be torture.
EXTENDED BODY:
Musicologist Lily Hirsch talks to Colin Peacock about how Barry Manilow stopped kids loitering, whether Enya swayed a jury and did Snoop Dogg get a bad rap?*
Lily Hirsch has been studying the relationship between music and crime. She is the author of Music in American Crime Prevention and Punishment.
Sydney council punishes with Manilow:
Lily Hirsch: To fight the noise [made by youths in a carpark in South Sydney] these officials decided to pipe in Barry Manilow. The press really picked up on Barry Manilow and there were lots of jokes at his expense, but it was also classical music, European concert music – any music that was thought to be “uncool”.
Colorado judge also punishes with Manilow:
Lily Hirsch: Judge Paul Sacco from Fort Lupton, Colorado, really made the news with this. He came up with this idea of responding to what was the normal punishment for a noise violator which was a money fine. This was supposed to be deterrent and also practical – generating revenue for the state. But Sacco was bothered by it because oftentimes the parents would pay the fine.
He invented what he called the ‘Music Immersion Programme’. This was kind of an eye-for an eye idea of fighting their loud music with our music. He says ‘our’ music but I’m sure this is not his music. A lot of it he seems to have chosen to be annoying. Any music when imposed, when you have to listen to it, can become annoying. I say that for Barry Manilow, who is included again.
Songs from the Music Immersion Programme’ include:
Barry Manilow – Can’t Smile Without You
Captain & Tennille – Wedding Song
Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly Theme
Patti Page – The Tennessee Waltz
The Platters – Only You
The Rembrandts – I’ll Be There For You (theme from Friends)
Itsy Bitsy Spider (traditional)
Boy George – Do You Really Want To Hurt Me?
Rap music and crime:
Lily Hirsch: There’s a couple of cases that are making headlines these days. One is where rap lyrics are cited during a court proceeding as evidence of the crime. The other one, you’re seeing rappers or wannabe artists prosecuted for their raps as a threat. If there’s some sort of embedded threat they can be prosecuted.
But most often lyrics are introduced that have very little tie to the crime, if at all. This is a real danger in a variety of ways. In all these cases, there is a strong likelihood that just the introduction of the lyrics is going to prejudice the proceedings.
It’s going to be more likely there is a conviction just with the introduction of rap in court – no questions asked. The jury is going to see the defendant in a certain light.
Snoop Dogg's song Murder Was the Case
Lily Hirsch: Snoop Dogg along with his bodyguard were arrested in 1993 for the murder of Philip Woldemariam. During the court proceedings the district attorney in his closing argument cited Murder Was the Case, saying ‘Murder is the crime they committed, murder is the crime they committed’.
That I see as the beginning or one of the earliest examples of the slew of cases that followed that cite rap lyrics as evidence and don’t take into consideration the music itself. For me, that’s the greatest wrong – you’re treating lyrics as a text divorced from music.
Rap is often marketed as authentic and violent lyrics can help certain raps sell. But apart from the reality of all that, we’re here at court and you need some expert testimony. These lyrics are not confessions. They are musical. Artists are often playing characters.
Enya's song Only Time:
Lily Hirsch: Douglas Oliver Kelly had been convicted of first-degree murder, then during the sentencing phase the prosecution offered as a victim impact statement this 20-minute video montage of the victim, who Kelly had robbed and raped.
In the video tape you’ve got photographs of the victim through her whole life, from infancy on, narrated by her mother and then set to the music of Enya.
When the jury sent out the guilty verdict and then recommend the sentence of death, which was imposed by the court, the defence said No, this would have not have happened, necessarily, without Enya. So I ask the question ‘Did Enya somehow condemn Kelly to death?’
The judge ultimately said that Enya did not condemn Kelly to death, that the music was not so powerful as to sway the jury and the impact was minimal. So the sentence was upheld.
*This interview has been edited
Songs played:
Barry Manilow – Copacabana
Snoop Dogg – Murder Was the Case
Enya – Only Time
Britney spears - Baby One More Time
Related stories
Topics: music, crime
Regions:
Tags: crime and punishment, music, Lily Hirsch, torture
Duration: 44'50"

10:50
Rebekah Corlett and Julian Raphael - Music to Love
BODY:
The traditional concert hall is not an environment that suits everyone, especially people with intellectual disabilities. Chamber Music New Zealand holds 'relaxed performances' and workshops for this community, during which audience members can move around, make sounds, interact and play along with the musicians. This week the group won the Arts Access Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award 2016. Julian Raphael is the workshop and concert facilitator for Chamber Music New Zealand and Rebekah Corlett attended a concert with her daughter, Sophia, who is 7 and has autism.
Topics: health, music
Regions:
Tags: Chamber Music New Zealand, Arts Access Aotearoa, Julian Raphael
Duration: 10'13"

11:05
Suzanne McFadden - Striking Gold
BODY:
Sports writer Suzanne McFadden, author of Striking Gold, tells the story of New Zealand's golden hockey moment at the Montreal Olympics.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Montreal Olympics, hockey, Suzanne McFadden
Duration: 20'04"

=SHOW NOTES=

Sunday Morning this week is presented by Colin Peacock

[image:77777:third]
7:08 Peter Mares - Not Quite Australian
Temporary migration is redefining Australian society. Peter Mares says there are around one million 'unsettled settlers' - including thousands of New Zealanders - on various kinds of temporary visas in Australia, and many are being unfairly treated. Peter Mares is a writer, researcher and a former ABC journalist, with a longstanding interest in migration issues. He joins Colin to discuss his new book, Not Quite Australian.
7:30 News headlines
7:32 The Week in Parliament
7:47 Report from Rio
RNZ sports team joins Colin with the latest from the Olympic Games.
8:12 Insight: Labour Hire Companies - Exploitation or Opportunity?
[image:77640:full]
Zero hours contracts may now be history, but has anything really changed for workers struggling to get employment? Businesses are often still looking to cut costs by hiring workers, sometimes for years, via a temping agency or labour hire company. Agencies and companies say the system gives workers experience and a foot in the door. But Insight's reporter, Teresa Cowie, talks to agency workers who say they are losing out on the benefits that permanent work brings
[image_crop:14685:quarter]
8:40 Chris Zeiher - Epic Bike Rides
Travel guide publisher Lonely Planet has just released Epic Bike Rides of the World - detailing routes as strenuous and exotic as the Tour d'Afrique from Cairo to Cape Town, to a far less punishing trip around the craft breweries of Colorado. The book, which also features a couple of rides in New Zealand, was edited by Chris Zeiher.
[image:77780:full]
9:06 Mediawatch
A decision is due soon on a merger that will see a single company dominate the newspaper market. But do locally owned papers make better business sense? Also: A call for a crackdown on cancerous clichés; and turning clickbait into gold at the Rio games.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
[image:77781:third]
9:40 Tim Vickery - Politics and Sport in Brazil
While the Olympic Games rock on, Brazil has also got pressing political and economic problems on its plate right now. Rio state is broke and the country's senate has voted to hold an impeachment trial for suspended president Dilma Rousseff, who is accused of breaking the budget law. Are the games a welcome distraction - or a hassle the citizens of Brazil could do without?
Tim Vickery is a British sports journalist and Brazilian football expert who has lived in Rio de Janeiro for more than 20 years.
[image_crop:14689:half]
10:06 Lily Hirsch - The Music of Hate
Musicologist Lily Hirsch talks to Colin Peacock about her book, Music in American Crime Prevention and Punishment. We canvas how Barry Manilow keeps kids from loitering; how Enya can sway a jury and why Britney Spears can be torture.
10:50 Rebekah Corlett and Julian Raphael - Music to Love
[image:77783:full]
The traditional concert hall is not an environment that suits everyone, especially people with intellectual disabilities. Chamber Music New Zealand holds 'relaxed performances' and workshops for this community, during which audience members can move around, make sounds, interact and play along with the musicians. This week the group won the Arts Access Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award 2016. Julian Raphael is the workshop and concert facilitator for Chamber Music New Zealand and Rebekah Corlett attended a concert with her daughter, Sophia, who is 7 and has autism.
[image_crop:14694:half]
11:05 Suzanne McFadden - Striking Gold
Sports writer Suzanne McFadden, author of Striking Gold, tells the story of New Zealand's golden hockey moment at the Montreal Olympics.

[image:51656:third]
11:25 A Wrinkle in Time
Episode 4 of Noelle McCarthy's podcast on ageing. This week, she looks at multi-generational societies - and the tensions that can arise.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Queen
Song: A Kind of Magic
Composer: Taylor
Album: Queen: Greatest Hits 2
Label: Parlophone
Broadcast Time: 8:40

Artist: Barry Manilow
Song: Copacabana
Composer: (Manilow,Sussman,Feldman)
Album: Barry Manilow: Greatest Hits Vol. 1&2
Label: Arista
Broadcast Time: 10:15

Artist: Snoop Dogg
Song: Murder Was The Case
Composer: Snoop Dogg
Album: Snoop Dogg & Dr Dre: From Compton to Longbeach
Label: Deathrow
Broadcast Time: 10:25

Artist: Enya
Song: Only Time
Composer: Enya
Album: A Day Without Rain
Label: WEA
Broadcast Time: 10:35

Artist: Britney Spears
Song: Baby One More Time
Composer: Martin
Album: Britney Spears: Greatest Hits, My Prerogative
Label: Jive
Broadcast Time: 10:45

===12:12 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment 1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris A weekly topical magazine programme about current film releases and film-related topics. (RNZ) 2:05 The Laugh Track

=AUDIO=

12:17
Genealogy and social media
BODY:
Family histories are often the starting point for filmmakers like Gaylene Preston in the film Home by Christmas - not to mention historical novellists like Stephanie Johnson and Jack Lazenby. It's Family History Month, so family history research is being discussed and promoted around the country. Lynn Freeman looks at one of the big issues being talked about - social media, and the pros and cons of using it to track down relatives and fellow genealogists.She's joined by genealogists Donna Bridgeman and Lisa Durrant.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'06"

12:46
Sir James McNeish's new play about Norman Kirk
BODY:
Norman Kirk was one of this country's most memorable, and most loved Prime Ministers, His death in 1973 saw a nationwide outpouring of grief. During just two years in office, he famously stood up to the French - taking them to the International Court of Justice at the United Nations and sending a New Zealand frigate to the Mururoa Atoll nuclear test zone. Sir James McNeish has written a play about Big Norm, concentrating on the last 72 hours of his life. The Fatal New Zealander is told from the perspective of people who knew him. James McNeish once interviewed Norm Kirk and has never forgotten that encounter, but, as he tells Lynn Freeman, it's his political achievements and statesmanship that he found himself thinking about over the years.
Topics: life and society, politics, books, history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'53"

13:32
Burmese-New Zealand film-maker Yamin Tun
BODY:
Yamin Tun won the Film Festival Short Film competition with Wait. It's an unusual film, but it turns out Yamin is an unusual film-maker. Some film-makers have started their career with an Oxford University degree in Philosophy, Politcs and Economics. But it's unlikely their love of film was inspired at the age of 6 - not by Cinderella or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, but by art-film titan Werner Herzog. Simon Morris was curious... [TOPICS] life and society [TAGS] film
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'53"

13:32
Burmese-New Zealand film-maker Yamin Tun
BODY:
Yamin Tun won the Film Festival Short Film competition with Wait. It's an unusual film, but it turns out Yamin is an unusual film-maker. Some film-makers have started their career with an Oxford University degree in Philosophy, Politcs and Economics. But it's unlikely their love of film was inspired at the age of 6 - not by Cinderella or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, but by art-film titan Werner Herzog. Simon Morris was curious... [TOPICS] life and society [TAGS] film
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'31"

13:46
Arts Acess Accolade winner Glen McDonald
BODY:
For almost quarter of a century Glen McDonald has championed artists you won't tend to find in fine art galleries. She's worked with hundreds of people who come to Vincents Art Workshop in Wellington to make art for free, from ceramics to painting. They tend to be called "outsider" or "naive" artists, though Glen rejects all attempts to slap a label the people she works with.Lynn Freeman talks to Glen about her 2016 Arts Access Accolade award for her life-long passion for creativity, community and inclusion.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: community, Art Access Accolade
Duration: 23'29"

14:36
The Opera Studio's singing coach Frances Wilson
BODY:
Behind every great singer is a great vocal coach, and Frances Wilson has been that coach for hundreds of singers over a long international career. She's currently the director of Auckland Opera Studio which provides free professional coaching to graduate students. Frances herself received a Scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music London in 1964, and says she learned a lot from Dame Sister Mary Leo, whose protegees included Dame Kiri te Kanawa. Lynn Freeman asked Frances if hard work and technique can turn a merely good voice into a great one:
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'40"

14:40
Best-selling graphic novelist Raina Telgemeier
BODY:
This is a Golden Age for Graphic novels - and leading the charge in America is Raina Telgemeier who's hit the New York Times bestseller list with several of her novels. The San Francisco-based author and illustrator has won two coveted Eisner Awards, and her titles include Sisters, Smile and most recently Ghosts, about a girl whose sister has cystic fibrosis. Raina is a guest speaker at the 'International Board on Books for Young People' Congress, being held in Auckland this week. Lynn Freeman asks her if the pictures or words come first when she's working on graphic novels:
EXTENDED BODY:
This is a Golden Age for Graphic novels - and leading the charge in America is Raina Telgemeier who's hit the New York Times bestseller list with several of her novels. The San Francisco-based author and illustrator has won two coveted Eisner Awards, and her titles include Sisters, Smile and most recently Ghosts, about a girl whose sister has cystic fibrosis.
Raina is a guest speaker at the 'International Board on Books for Young People' Congress, being held in Auckland this week.
Lynn Freeman asks her if the pictures or words come first when she's working on graphic novels.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'04"

14:52
Artist, poet and activist Cleo Wade
BODY:
Cleo Wade is an American artist and poet who's been known to write her poetry on the sides of multi-storey buildings. Just last year she installed an 8-metre-high love-poem called Respect in her birthplace of New Orleans. She has a lot to say - Cleo is an activist for gender and race equality, sits on the board of the National Black Theater in Harlem, she's a champion for children's education and rights, and was recently in rural Vietnam looking into climate change. Lynn Freeman spoke to Cleo on the eve of her appearance at Semi Permanent 2016 in Auckland.
EXTENDED BODY:
Cleo Wade is an American artist and poet who's been known to write her poetry on the sides of multi-storey buildings. Just last year she installed an 8-metre-high love-poem called Respect in her birthplace of New Orleans. She has a lot to say - Cleo is an activist for gender and race equality, sits on the board of the National Black Theater in Harlem, she's a champion for children's education and rights, and was recently in rural Vietnam looking into climate change.
Lynn Freeman spoke to Cleo on the eve of her appearance at Semi Permanent 2016 in Auckland.
Read an edited excerpt of their interview below:
It’s a big step to go from being a young person falling in love with poetry to standing and looking up at a 50-foot building with your words stretched across it…
Every time I make anything, I just think about who that could help and what that could mean to someone who is looking for a sign. I wrote a poem that said, write the sign you want to see. And I think that when I think about my public works, which really are some of my favourite things, I really was writing the sign that I needed to see and I imagine that a lot of people going through life, it’ll make them feel good to see that.
What can you tell us about your work Respect that you put up in your hometown of New Orleans?
That was a billboard that I put up in my hometown during the 10 year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the poem said, “Baby you are the strongest flower that ever grew, remember that when the weather changes”. And I called that poem Respect because when you really look into the definition of respect, it means to have deep admiration for what someone has been through.
Gender and race issues are very dear to your heart. Have you found that poetry can make a difference?
I think that anything that is made or written or done with the intention of speaking to someone’s humanity is helpful. I think that when you create with the intention of speaking to someone’s soul and far beyond the habitual thought patterns of fear-based thinking, I always thinks that that makes strides in the public realm in politics and in race and in gender and LGBTQ rights etc.
There is so much going on in America at the moment, in politics. There is so much clamour, so much discord in America at the moment. Are you finding it a tough place to be at the moment, given the beliefs you have about race equality and some of the statements coming through now?
It’s funny because a lot of it is nothing new in our world. It’s just that when we’re going through phases of society where we’re giving a certain level of attention to people expressing themselves through violence and hatred, it does definitely become pretty intense, because it’s not every day that someone is standing up on a podium really releasing violent words and attitudes.
We have young kids who we are teaching to not be violent in this world and to love people and people who are expecting themselves to be leaders of a country who are being very violent in their language, that’s what young people soak up.
I am so passionate about young people and I want them to love themselves and love each other and join in in community and become community leaders and really affect our world through that type of movement. So, it’s not that it’s difficult because… it is what it is and I am not in the business of letting things be what they are, it just calls on a deeper level of love.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'01"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:16 Genealogy and social media
[image:77796:half]
Family histories are often the starting point for filmmakers like Gaylene Preston in the film Home by Christmas - not to mention historical novellists like Stephanie Johnson and Jack Lazenby. It's Family History Month, so family history research is being discussed and promoted around the country. Lynn Freeman looks at one of the big issues being talked about - social media, and the pros and cons of using it to track down relatives and fellow genealogists.She's joined by genealogists Donna Bridgeman and Lisa Duggan.
12:42 Sir James McNeish's new play about Norman Kirk
[image:77787:full] no caption
Norman Kirk was one of this country's most memorable, and most loved Prime Ministers, His death in 1973 saw a nationwide outpouring of grief. During just two years in office, he famously stood up to the French - taking them to the International Court of Justice at the United Nations and sending a New Zealand frigate to the Mururoa Atoll nuclear test zone. Sir James McNeish has written a play about Big Norm, concentrating on the last 72 hours of his life. The Fatal New Zealander is told from the perspective of people who knew him. James McNeish once interviewed Norm Kirk and has never forgotten that encounter, but, as he tells Lynn Freeman, it's his political achievements and statesmanship that he found himself thinking about over the years.
1:10 At The Movies
Poi E, Suicide Squad and the New Zealand's top short films for 2016.
1:35 Burmese-New Zealand film-maker Yamin Tun
[image:77800:full]
Yamin Tun won the Film Festival Short Film competition with Wait. It's an unusual film, but it turns out Yamin is an unusual film-maker. Some film-makers have started their career with an Oxford University degree in Philosophy, Politcs and Economics. But it's unlikely their love of film was inspired at the age of 6 - not by Cinderella or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, but by art-film titan Werner Herzog. Simon Morris was curious...
1:47 Arts Acess Accolade winner Glen McDonald
[gallery:2369]
For almost quarter of a century Glen McDonald has championed artists you won't tend to find in fine art galleries. She's worked with hundreds of people who come to Vincents Art Workshop in Wellington to make art for free, from ceramics to painting. They tend to be called "outsider" or "naive" artists, though Glen rejects all attempts to slap a label the people she works with.Lynn Freeman talks to Glen about her 2016 Arts Access Accolade award for her life-long passion for creativity, community and inclusion.
2:06 The Laugh Track - Kyle Mewburn
Children's author Kyle Mewburn picks Abbott & Costello, The Frost Report, Mitchell & Webb and Australian comedian Steve Hughes.
2:25 The Opera Studio's singing coach Frances Wilson
[image:77799:full]
Behind every great singer is a great vocal coach, and Frances Wilson has been that coach for hundreds of singers over a long international career. She's currently the director of Auckland Opera Studio which provides free professional coaching to graduate students. Frances herself received a Scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music London in 1964, and says she learned a lot from Dame Sister Mary Leo, whose protegees included Dame Kiri te Kanawa. Lynn Freeman asked Frances if hard work and technique can turn a merely good voice into a great one:
2:41 Best-selling graphic novelist Raina Telgemeier
[image:77805:third]
[image:77803:half]
This is a Golden Age for Graphic novels - and leading the charge in America is Raina Telgemeier who's hit the New York Times bestseller list with several of her novels. The San Francisco-based author and illustrator has won two coveted Eisner Awards, and her titles include Sisters, Smile and most recently Ghosts, about a girl whose sister has cystic fibrosis. Raina is a guest speaker at the 'International Board on Books for Young People' Congress, being held in Auckland this week. Lynn Freeman asks her if the pictures or words come first when she's working on graphic novels:
2:51 Artist, poet and activist Cleo Wade
[image:77797:full]
[image:77798:third]
Cleo Wade is an American artist and poet who's been known to write her poetry on the sides of multi-storey buildings. Just last year she installed an 8-metre-high love-poem called Respect in her birthplace of New Orleans. She has a lot to say - Cleo is an activist for gender and race equality, sits on the board of the National Black Theater in Harlem, she's a champion for children's education and rights, and was recently in rural Vietnam looking into climate change. Lynn Freeman spoke to Cleo on the eve of her appearance at Semi Permanent 2016 in Auckland.

3:06 Drama at 3
Part 4 of Wulfsyarn; Kiwi Noir

===3:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

An epic futuristic tale of the tragic maiden voyage of the gargantuan strarship, The Nightingale, captained by the enigmatic and fatally flawed, Jon Wilberfoss. (Part 4 of 10, RNZ)

===3:35 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Classic radio crime drama from the Police files of New Zealand. (RNZ)

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A panel discussion from the Auckland Museum about the about feminism in New Zealand and the everyday realities of the quest for equality. In this first of the 2016 Smart Talk series, you can hear from the writer and musician Courtney Sina Meredith; the Māori, women’s and LGBT rights advocate Dr Ngahuia Te Awekotuku; the social and critical accounting researcher Dr Pala Molisa; and the Pasifika artist Rosanna Raymond. Mihingarangi Forbes in the chair for this RNZ recording. Listen to Mana Wahine

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Personal approaches to religious belief and spirituality from around the world (BBC)

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
'Marry a man with calloused hands'
BODY:
In part three of this four part series, Te Ahi Kaa seeks out a variety of interpretations of whakatauki or proverbial sayings. This week, Moea he tangata ringa raupa (Marry a man with calloused hands) is explored.
EXTENDED BODY:
Moea he tangata ringa raupa
Marry a man with calloused hands.
In episode three of Te Ahi Kaa's four-part series about whakatauki (proverbial sayings) Justine Murray looks at Moea he tangata ringa raupa.
Episode one - The Sweetness of the Kumara
Episode two - Octopus vs Shark

What is the sign of a good man? Perhaps looking at his hands could be a good start.
This whakatauki can apply to anyone and is not gender-specific, but there is a similar whakatauki for women – Aitia te wahine i roto i te pā harakeke (Marry a woman of the flax bush). This saying refers to the work carried out by industrious women in raranga (weaving).
Dr Wayne Ngata says Moea he tangata ringa raupa is not only about the physical aspects of hard work.
“Marry somebody or be with somebody who is a hard worker in whatever field. We say ringaraupa - that’s physically hardworking. The ringaraupa is not just about hard work, but smart work” - Dr Wayne Ngata.
Professor Taiarahia Black says this whakatauki encompasses different traits of strength in a person.
“Moea te tangata manaaki. Moea te tangata whakawhanaunga. Moea te tangata, who looks after this wife. Moea te tangata, who is selfless and does not consider himself important but continues to work for his whanau day and night" - Professor Taiarahia Black.
Te Wharekura o Mauao student Kanapa Kerr explains that the term ringa raupa (hardwork) is about young Māori going back at the marae.
“Rangatahi need to step up and go back to their marae, finish off things that were given to us and use them... Ko te tangata ringa raupa he tangata kei nga marae e tautoko ana i tana ake whanau, ki enei ra, kua mimiti haere te puna paepae” - Kanapa Kerr.
Ngāti Rehia Kuia Nora Rameka knows a thing or two about hard work. The 72 year old was born and raised at Te Tii in the Northland. It was a hard life, where home was a simple shack with a dirt floor and no running water or power.
Nora was one of 14 children and remembers her mother ploughing the paddocks while heavily pregnant and her father walking every Sunday just to make it to work in time. It would be a 28km round trip from Te Tii to Waipapa.
Nora grew up with a love for the land, and was nurtured by the wider community, she says she 'belonged' to everyone. Her family lived off the land, she was one of fourteen children. Nora took these philosophies of hard work from her parents and applied it to her own life.
She became the first Māori to work for the Trade Union Education Authority and assisted Māori workers to know about their rights. This work led to Nora becoming the Authority’s National Co-ordinator.
Her employers sent Nora to the USA to study labour management at ivy league university Harvard. After her work at the Trade Union, Nora was appointed as a Māori Recruitment Advisor at The University of Waikato, which meant she was able to finish her degree in Social Sciences.
Nora became a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit at last year’s Queens Birthday Honours for her work in housing and education. Her proudest achievement was restoring the old wharenui at Takou Bay and building papakainga (housing).
International speaker and entrepreneur Ngahihi o te ra Bidios says this whakatauki is about a strong partnership.
Ngahihi credits his wife of 31 years for allowing him to follow his own goals. He trained as a teacher and has worked in most areas of the education sector. Today the budding entrepreneur travels extensively for corporate speaking engagements. Ngahihi says his key motivation is helping people reach their best.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society
Regions:
Tags: te reo
Duration: 28'13"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:40 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:05 PM. | TED Radio Hour===
=DESCRIPTION=

A crafted hour of ideas worth sharing presented by Guy Raz (NPR)

===8:06 PM. | Sunday Night===
=AUDIO=
8:27pm
Peter Dunn four in four
Four questions in four minutes.

9:16pm
Angela Ayers from the beginning
From School to Sydney.
=DESCRIPTION=

An evening of music and nostalgia (RNZ)

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in New Zealand's news media (RNZ)

===10:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house.

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288309

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 14 Aug 2016

We use cookies to help us understand how you use our site, and make your experience better. To find out more read our privacy policy.

Whakamahia ai mātou ngā pihikete ki te rapu māramatanga ki te āhua o tō whakamahi i tēnei paetukutuku, ki te whakapai hoki i tō whai wāhi mai. Ki te rapu kōrero anō pānuitia te kaupapahere tūmataiti.

Accept