U-series. News from the Troops No 2. Part 4 of 6

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Tono kōrero mai

Part 4 of 6.
An interview by Mobile Unit commentator Doug Laurenson [Military Service no. 34957]with a 2NZEF Quartermaster Sergeant named 'Bert', about life on board their troopship. (He is probably Albert John Wyeth [Military Service no. 27368)].

He explains reveille is at 6.30am and then describes a typical day on board. The men have to store all personnel gear away. This is followed by breakfast. Sea sickness is a thing of the past. After breakfast the fatigue party ensures every thing is ship shape.

9.15 am is the roll call to ensure every one is present. This is followed by physical training and sports on deck to keep the men fit e.g. quoits, deck bowls, races on deck, potato races [The second part of the interview is on U15]

He explains reveille is at 6.30am and then describes a typical day on board. The men have to store all personnel gear away. This is followed by breakfast. Sea sickness is a thing of the past. After breakfast the fatigue party ensures every thing is ship shape.

9.15 am is the roll call to ensure every one is present. This is followed by physical training (no longer called physical jerks) and sports to keep the men fit.

Every conceivable type of deck game is played. e.g. quoits, deck bowls, races on deck, potato races. Every sport you can think of is used to keep the men 'in the nick' including 100 yard races.

This item is part of a collection of recordings made by the Mobile Broadcasting Units, which travelled overseas with New Zealand forces between 1940-1945. They recorded New Zealanders' experiences of war and messages to their families and friends, which were sent back home to be played on a weekly radio programme.

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Year 1940

Reference number 10981

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Credits Laurenson, Doug, Commentator
Wyeth, Albert John, Speaker/Kaikōrero
New Zealand Mobile Broadcasting Unit, Broadcaster

Duration 00:04:16

Date 10 Sep 1940

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