Radio New Zealand National. 2015-07-05. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

05 July 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday 3:05 In the Beef Market, by Patrick Coogan, read by Jed Brophy (RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Real Friends, by David Hill, told by Jane Waddel ; Ducks n Water, by Apirana Taylor, told by Waimihi Hotere; Northwood, by Brian Falkner, told by Fiona Samuel; Grandpa's Slippers, by Joy Watson, told by Alice Fraser; Give it a Heave, by David Hill, told by Megan Alexander, Simon Leary, Tess Jamieson and Phil Ward (RNZ)

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, music and including: 7:43 The Week in Parliament: An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ) 8:10 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ) 9:06 Mediawatch: Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:11
What can the USA learn from the Pacific about gun control?
BODY:
After the killings at the Emanuel Church in South Carolina, we again have people calling for action, and others arguing that it's not a gun issue, it's a mental health issue. But what can the Pacific teach us about gun control and reduction? Philip Alpers is recognised among the 'Top 100 most influential people in armed violence reduction' compiled by the peak international NGO in this field. He is founding director of GunPolicy.org, a global project of the Sydney School of Public Health which compares armed violence, firearm injury prevention and gun law across 300 jurisdictions world-wide.
EXTENDED BODY:
After the killings at the Emanuel Church in South Carolina, we again have people calling for action, and others arguing that it's not a gun issue, it's a mental health issue. But what can the Pacific teach us about gun control and reduction?
Former New Zealand journalist and documentary maker Philip Alpers is now an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney’s School of Public Health. He is also the founding director of GunPolicy.org, a global project which compares armed violence, firearm injury prevention and gun law across 300 jurisdictions world-wide.
He speaks to Wallace about the continuing debate over gun control in America, whether Australia’s crackdown on guns following the Port Arthur massacre nearly 20 years ago has really had an effect – and whether or not it could work in the US.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: gun control, USA
Duration: 16'39"

07:26
Tongans celebrate coronation of King Tupou VI
BODY:
Tonga is celebrating the official crowning of King Tupou VI, which is taking place in Tonga's capital, Nuku'alofa - It's a huge event for the nation and Tonga's diaspora. The ceremony was attended by heads of state, dignitaries, and royal guests from around the world,
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Tonga, King Tupou VI
Duration: 6'08"

07:35
The Week In Parliament for 5 July 2015
BODY:
Good news for the Port Chalmers bowls club, and a standing ovation for the Clerk of the House following 28 years of service.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'14"

07:50
The Super Rugby final
BODY:
Radio NZ sports reporter Barry Guy reviews last night's final between the Hurricanes and the Highlanders.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Super Rugby final, rugby
Duration: 3'22"

07:55
Dave Luddy from Wimbledon
BODY:
Dave updates us on what's happening at Wimbledon 2015.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Wimbledon, tennis
Duration: 4'36"

08:12
Insight for 5 July 2015 - Getting Real About Renting
BODY:
Kate Newton explores what changes might be needed to support long term renting.
EXTENDED BODY:
The pressure is on to give tenants more rights, as increasing numbers of people find themselves renting for longer and later into life.
The number of people in their early 30s who own their own home has dropped from half in 2001 to about a third.
Listen to Insight: Getting Real About Renting
Many renters want more secure tenancies and the ability to make minor changes, such as adding a new coat of paint.
Grae Burton lives with his wife and two-year-old daughter in an older-style apartment in Auckland's Parnell. He never planned to be renting well into his 30s.
"I do feel like it's a lot of money to throw into something that, in the end, isn't yours - that you don't really have control over the length of time you can stay here," he said.
"I want for my daughter to have a home that she can grow up in and not feel like she doesn't have that stability in her life. Anything that can help that I think will be really positive."

Mr Burton isn't alone.
Once a "quarter-acre paradise," New Zealand is increasingly becoming a land of tenants rather than home owners.
Shamubeel Eaqub, a principal economist at the Institute of Economic Research, became so intrigued by a growing generation of long-term renters that he and his wife Selena recently published a book about it.
Since 1991, home ownership has dropped steadily, Mr Eaqub said.
"For the early 30 year olds, nearly 50 percent of them used to have their own home ... but today we're talking about just over a third of those people - so it's been quite a big shift for the younger households, especially for that family-forming age group."
Overall, 51 percent of New Zealanders over the age of 15 now live in a rented house, with home-ownership dropping off across nearly all age groups.
The Government has so far focused its efforts on trying to build more homes in an effort to meet housing demand.
Renting could and should be a viable long-term or even permanent alternative, but the current system condemns renters to a second-rate situation, Mr Eaqub said.
The Residential Tenancies Act, which came into force in 1986 and has remained largely intact since, requires landlords to give tenants three months' notice to end a lease.
But that notice period drops to just six weeks if the landlord wants to sell the property or use it for themselves, family members or employees to live in.
"The way that it's still set up is very much one about flatting."

"Renting doesn't give you security, so you might be asked to leave for any reason - quite often the leases you can get are only for 12 months, and that means that people have that inability to put roots down and make a shelter a home,"Mr Eaqub said.
The European Model
A professor of property at Auckland University, Laurence Murphy, said there were benefits to renting. Some people found by renting rather than buying, they could live in nicer neighbourhoods or in suburbs closer to the city and cultural activities.
However, he believed tenancy laws needed a shake-up, and suggested Germany and Switzerland, which both have large renting populations, as examples that New Zealand could look to.
"What you've developed is a rental sector that has strong controls over issues of tenant security ... so you can have long-term rental agreements."
Many of the rental properties in both countries have large-scale professional owners, such as pension funds, he said.
"So in a sense they're managing it more like a business, and they're interested in the consumer."
Marcel Kelm, a dentistry student in Germany, has rented the same two-bedroom apartment in central Berlin for five years.
When he moved in, he set about re-painting some walls grey, and installed a kitchen, as the apartment came without one.
Making those changes was completely normal, Mr Kelm said.
"They tell you, feel free to paint the walls whatever colour you want, and everything else.
"When you quit the apartment, you just have to give it [back] in the state it was when you moved in. I think it's a standard here in Germany that all walls have to be white, for example, and when you paint them grey like I did, when I move out one day, then we have to paint them white again."

Mr Kelm's landlord is a company that owns the entire 16-apartment building, charging him €400 Euros a month.
An official rental index kept housing costs relatively stable in Germany for decades, but rents on new leases increased in Berlin, and other German cities, where there was an apartment shortage.
That prompted the government to introduce a Mietbremse recently - a brake on rents that prevents landlords from charging new tenants any more than 10 percent above average rents.
Tenant Responsiblity
But of course, tenants are only one side of the equation.
Auckland landlord, Helen Walsh, has rented out a house in Forrest Hill on the city's North Shore for the last 15 years, and said she has had her fair share of "appalling" tenants.
But she is not necessarily opposed to some of the changes renters are suggesting, she said.
"I think the essential, fundamental change that would have to happen is that tenants have to be able to trust landlords, but landlords have to be able to trust tenants."
To make both sides' obligations clear, it would help if the Residential Tenancies Act was more descriptive, she said.
"Then when you go to [the Tenancy] Tribunal it needs to have some teeth - it needs to perhaps lead the way on what's acceptable and what's not acceptable."
There was a danger in granting tenants greater rights over what they could do with a rental property, Ms Walsh said.
"What happens ... is you make sure you tighten up your criteria for who comes into your house in the first place, and then that tends to eliminate any form of risk - and then lots of people will not be considered for rental properties where previously they may have [been]."

Government Action
While home ownership and housing affordability have dominated the agenda for this government, the Building and Housing Minister, Nick Smith, said change was coming for those in the rental market.
"We are not prepared to give up on a generation and say renting is as good as it gets, but equally so we're interested in improvements we can make in the residential tenancy law to try and provide a greater degree of security and to make it work better for those that are renting."
Officials were working on possible changes, with legislation set to be introduced to Parliament in the second half of this year, and announced as early as this month, Dr Smith said.
Reform was unlikely to go as far as the regulations that governed the German rental system, but he was prepared to review the standard tenancy contract outlined in the Residential Tenancies Act, he said.
Follow Insight on Twitter

Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: renting
Duration: 28'23"

08:40
The Greek Referendum
BODY:
Miranda Manasiadis is a Wellington actor and theatre director currently in Athens, and Maria Verivaki is a Wellington-born Greek who returned to her parents' home island of Crete 24 years ago. As the clock clicks down to midnight in Greece, the pair reflect on today's referendum and the impact of austerity policies that have created 60 percent youth unemployment rates and a 35 percent increase in suicide.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'14"

09:10
Mediawatch for 5 July 2015
BODY:
Media freedom advocates say the new cyber-bullying law could cramp their style; controversial questions aired on Native Affairs; angst over bad ads on Maori TV; on-demand viewers ever more demanding; a startling stat from struggling Greece.
Topics: media, politics, internet
Regions:
Tags: Maori TV, Greek debt crisis, cyber-bully
Duration: 32'02"

09:40
Dudley Benson - Love Record to Our land
BODY:
Dunedin musician Dudley Benson is working on finishing his third album, Zealandia, which he describes as "a passionate love record to our land". It features a full symphony orchestra, 50-person choir, and beats made from rocks and fossils. It's been a three-year labour of love and now he's crowd-funding to get it completed.
EXTENDED BODY:

Dunedin musician Dudley Benson is working on finishing his third album, Zealandia, which he describes as “a passionate love record to our land”.
It features a full symphony orchestra, 50-person choir, and beats made from rocks and fossils. It’s been a three-year labour of love and now he’s crowd-funding to get it completed.
He talks to Wallace Chapman about the project.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Dudley Benson
Duration: 19'51"

10:10
Craig Horrocks - World Press Photo Exhibition
BODY:
Craig Horrocks speaks to Wallace about the World Press Photo Exhibition - an annual exhibition showcasing the best of the world's photojournalism. We talk about the striking and confronting images, and how the rise of smart-phones is making photographers of us all. The World Press Photo Exhibition opens in Auckland on July 4 and in Wellington on September 19.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: photography, photojournalism
Duration: 17'28"

10:40
Tearepa Kahi - Romeo raua ko Hurieta
BODY:
Actor, and director of Mt Zion Tearepa Kahi, is about to stage William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet in te reo, to mark Matariki. He joins Wallace to talk about the challenges of translating the Bard's work into Maori and just what audiences might see in this new production of Romeo raua ko Hurieta at the Auckland War Memorial Museum.
Topics: arts, te ao Maori, language
Regions:
Tags: theatre, Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, te reo Maori, Auckland
Duration: 15'12"

11:05
Bunny McDiarmid - Life and Influences
BODY:
Bunny McDiarmid is the outgoing head of Greenpeace New Zealand. Her life as an environmental activist began in earnest with her joining the crew of the anti-nuclear protest ship The Fri in the early 1980s. She later crewed on the Rainbow Warrior - bombed by the French 30 years ago this month. Bunny McDiarmid reflects on the individuals, thinkers, books and events that have influenced her own ideas.
EXTENDED BODY:

Bunny McDiarmid is the outgoing head of Greenpeace New Zealand. Her life as an environmental activist began in earnest with her joining the crew of the anti-nuclear protest ship The Fri in the early 1980s. She later crewed on the Rainbow Warrior – bombed by the French 30 years ago this month.
Bunny McDiarmid reflects on the individuals, thinkers, books and events that have influenced her own ideas. A list that includes: her mother, Mary, who took up reading in her 80s and discovered Mills and Boon; Dutch philosopher Frans Geraedts; US senator Elizabeth Warren; Indian writer and activist Arundhati Roy; and moving the people of Rongelap away from their radioactively contaminated home island in 1985.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Bunny McDiarmid, Greenpeace, activism
Duration: 54'43"

19:30
The Week In Parliament for 5 July
BODY:
A good week for Port Chalmers Bowling Club; PM faces questions on Housing; There's also questions for John Key about NZ's UN Security Council presidency; Harmful Digital Communications Bill passes final reading, with some Green MPs crossing the floor to vote against it; Petition on Climate Change presented by Sir Alan Mark; Judicial Conduct Commissioners appointed; Motion on Nauru passed; Snap debate on CERA declined; Tributes to retiring Clerk of the House Mary Harris.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'14"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:08 Current affairs
Former New Zealand journalist and documentary maker Philip Alpers is now an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney’s School of Public Health. He is also the founding director of GunPolicy.org, a global project which compares armed violence, firearm injury prevention and gun law across 300 jurisdictions world-wide. He speaks to Wallace about the continuing debate over gun control in America, whether Australia’s crackdown on guns following the Port Arthur massacre nearly 20 years ago has really had an effect – and whether or not it could work in the US. Also in this hour: The Week in Parliament; the coronation of Tupou VI of Tonga, the Super Rugby Final, and the heat is on at Wimbledon.
8:12 Insight Getting Real about Renting
Home ownership may still be the Kiwi dream, but for a growing number of New Zealanders renting is the reality. More than half the population aged 15 or over now lives in a rental property, and people are renting for longer and much later into life. Is it time to consider those who are renting indefinitely? Kate Newton asks what changes are needed to tenancy laws and culture, to make renting a more attractive prospect.
Produced by Philippa Tolley.
8:40 Maria Verivaki and Miranda Manasiadis – The Greek Referendum
Miranda Manasiadis is a Wellington actor and theatre director currently in Athens and Maria Verivaki is a Wellington-born Greek who returned to her parents’ home island of Crete 24 years ago. As the clock clicks down to midnight in Greece – both literally and metaphorically – the pair reflect on today’s referendum and the impact of austerity policies that have left 60 percent of young Greeks unemployed and seen suicide rates increase by 35 percent.
9:06 Mediawatch
On Mediawatch this week – why media freedom advocates fear a new law targeting cyber-bullying; controversial questions about Maori TV; on demand viewers getting ever more demanding; and the truth about a startling stat from Greece.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Dudley Benson – Love Record to Our land
Dunedin musician Dudley Benson is working on finishing his third album, Zealandia, which he describes as “a passionate love record to our land”. It features a full symphony orchestra, 50-person choir, and beats made from rocks and fossils. It’s been a three-year labour of love and now he’s crowd-funding to get it completed.

10:06 Craig Horrocks – World Press Photo Exhibition
Craig Horrocks speaks to Wallace about the World Press Photo Exhibition – an annual exhibition showcasing the best of the world’s photojournalism. We talk about the striking and confronting images, and how the rise of smart-phones is making photographers of us all. The World Press Photo Exhibition opens in Auckland on July 4 and in Wellington on September 19.
10:30 Tearepa Kahi – Romeo raua ko Hurieta
Actor, and director of Mt Zion Tearepa Kahi, is about to stage William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in te reo, to mark Matariki. He joins Wallace to talk about the challenges of translating the Bard’s work into Maori and just what audiences might see in this new production of Romeo raua ko Hurieta at the Auckland War Memorial Museum.
11:05 Bunny McDiarmid – Life and Influences
Bunny McDiarmid is the outgoing head of Greenpeace New Zealand. Her life as an environmental activist began in earnest with her joining the crew of the anti-nuclear protest ship The Fri in the early 1980s. She later crewed on the Rainbow Warrior – bombed by the French 30 years ago this month. Bunny McDiarmid reflects on the individuals, thinkers, books and events that have influenced her own ideas. A list that includes: her mother, Mary, who took up reading in her 80s and discovered Mills and Boon; Dutch philosopher Frans Geraedts; US senator Elizabeth Warren; Indian writer and activist Arundhati Roy; and moving the people of Rongelap away from their radioactively contaminated home island in 1985.

Earlier interviews in the Influential Kiwis talk about their Influences series

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Dudley Benson
Song: Muscles
Composer: Dudley Benson
Album: Zealandia
Label: Golden Retriever Records
Broadcast Time: 9:40am
Artist: Dudley Benson
Song: Tui
Composer: Hirini Melbourne
Album: Forest: Songs by Hirini Melbourne
Label: Golden Retriever Records
Broadcast Time: 9:55am
Artist: BJ Thomas
Song: Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head
Composer: David Bacharach
Album: Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid
Label: A & M
Artist: Various (Che Fu, Anika Moa, Hinewehi Mohi, Kirsten Morelle (Goldenhorse), David Atai & Donald McNulty (Nesian Mystik), Milan Borich (Pluto), Adeaze)
Song: Anchor Me
Composer: McGlashan
Album: Anchor Me
Label: Greenpeace
Artist: BB King
Song: Lucille
Composer: BB King
Album: Lucille
Label: MCA

===12:12 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

The No 1 NZ General Hospital was established in the Hampshire village of Brockenhurst in 1916. It was staffed and operated by the NZ Medical Corps to care for wounded members of the NZ Expeditionary Force. Just as the hospital opened, young farming woman Deborah Pitts Taylor arrived at Brockenhurst to take up the job as ambulance driver. This is her story derived from letters home and diaries (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:15
One Woman, One Ambulance, WWI
BODY:
She was a young New Zealander driving a big old ambulance during World War One in Britain. Deborah Taylor was one only a few colonials doing that job, and a woman who was prepared to get her hands grubby. Deborah Pitts Taylor, Brockenhurst, No 1 New Zealand General Hospital, New Zealand Medical Corps, George Taylor, Brian Taylor, Seymour Spencer, MBE, Hampshire, V. A. D, WW1 [
EXTENDED BODY:
[ As a New Zealand woman] you are a bit of a pal, while an English girl, is a girl to be flirted with!”- Deborah Pitts Taylor, England 1917.

She was a young New Zealand woman driving and maintaining her own big ambulance during the First World War. Twenty two -year old Deborah Taylor transported hundreds of injured New Zealand soldiers for treatment to a New Zealand Military Hospital, deep in rural Hampshire.
Over twenty one thousand soldiers were treated at Brockenhurst and only ninety three of them died and were buried there.
Every April, Brockenhurst marks Anzac Day. It’s one of a small number of places in Britain to do so. In Brockenhurst you’ll find an Auckland Avenue and an Auckland Place. Inside the village’s old Norman church of St Nicholas the New Zealand Flag hangs, and there are Maori weavings on display
The No 1 New Zealand General Hospital was established in the village in 1916. It was one of three New Zealand military hospitals in the United Kingdom, staffed and operated by the New Zealand Medical Corps to care for wounded members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.
100-thousand New Zealanders signed up to go to war, including over 500-women nurses.
Just as the hospital opened, young farming woman Deborah Pitts Taylor arrived at Brockenhurst to take up the job as ambulance driver. She’d come to the UK with her younger brother Brian who, at seventeen had been too young to enlist at home, but was able to sign up in Britain. Deborah was one of three sisters and two brothers. Her older brother George had already gone off to war.
As a kiwi, Deborah was unusual because she was one of few colonials amongst the ambulance drivers at Brockenhurst who were mostly men, and she was a woman who could get her hands dirty doing basic maintenance work on the lumbering ambulances; undoubtedly to the admiration of her workmates.
Deborah was called a “V.A.D”, as a member of the Voluntary Aid Detachment. Over the war years she drove thousands of miles delivering dozens of wounded men who’d been brought in by ship to Southhampton, thirteen miles away on the coast from Brockenhurst.
She recorded the daily trials and joys of her life in diaries and letters home. Her granddaughter Janet Frater who knew Deborah well, has in her possession just one of the wartime diaries, from 1917 and many of those letters.
Janet Frater recalls her grandmother was always rather proud of her driving skills. In one light hearted letter Deborah confesses.
“We get six shillings a week more than the other V.A.D’s. It makes me blush with shame when I compare my job with theirs. But of course it’s only good luck because I have such good friends to help me out of difficulties”.
She goes on to describe her relationship with her male work mates.
“The mere fact of my being a New Zealand girl was enough for them to take me into their clan, so to speak. They treat a New Zealand girl quite differently. It’s very funny. They will lie down and die for you, if necessary, but you are expected to be very understanding, and put up with no end of teasing; and not to expect any pretty compliments, because you won’t get them. You are a bit of a pal, while an English girl is a girl to be flirted with! “
During those years Deborah lost first her older brother George, killed in France, and then her beloved baby brother Brian. She writes about George’s death in her 1917 diary.
“14th December 1917. Somehow I felt afraid last night and put it down to the dread of bad news. I went to work…. I went down and a wire was handed to me. Oh it was awful. Just full of official wording that George had died of wounds in France. The formal words lessened the blow a little. I felt staggered. Yet, how I have dreaded this.”
Deborah returned to New Zealand in 1918, to help her widowed mother who had moved to Auckland from the family farm. Deborah married returned soldier Seymour Spencer in August 1920. Seymour had been wounded at Gallipoli and gassed in France. Janet Frater says he clearly suffered from shell shock, or what we now know as post-traumatic stress disorder. When she was a child, Janet remembers him shouting out in the night.
Deborah was awarded an MBE in the New Year’s Honours list of 1920. Fittingly,she died aged eighty five, on Anzac Day,1979. In 2008 Deborah's 1915 diary was put up for sale through an Australian auction house (not by Janet Frater). It was listed as "WW1 Diary of Great Importance" with an estimated value of up to three thousand dollars. It didn't sell.

Topics: history
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Deborah Pitts Taylor, Brockenhurst, No 1 New Zealand General Hospital, New Zealand Medical Corps, George Taylor, Brian Taylor, Seymour Spencer, MBE, Hampshire, V. A. D, WW1
Duration: 24'12"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:40 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 3:04 The Drama Hour

=AUDIO=

12:42
2015 International Award for Public Art
BODY:
Public art works tend to be polarizing - loved or loathed, embraced as a welcome addition to a community or resented because of the cost or the look of the work. Should the public have a say in substantial public art works, or is that a decision best left to others? Lewis Biggs has just judged the 2015 International Award for Public Art in Auckland. He is a former director of the Tate Liverpool - the city was the 2008 European Capital of Culture which saw many millions of pounds poured into its regeneration.
Topics: arts
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: arts funding, public art, Liverpool
Duration: 9'27"

12:50
Hawke’s Bay and East Coast women at war
BODY:
"What did you do in the War Gran?" That's a question researcher Professor Kay Morris Matthews from the Eastern Institute of Technology wants more people to ask. She's tracked down the stories of 64 Hawkes Bay women who served overseas in The Great War for an exhibition at the MTG Hawke's Bay. The nurses, teachers and volunteers travelled far from the land they knew, to war-torn England, Egypt, Greece, and France.
EXTENDED BODY:

Lonsdale House Hospital, London, March 1918, photographer unknown, Spencer Collection, Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust, Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi, [90314]
“What did you do in the War Gran?” That's a question researcher Professor Kay Morris Matthews from the Eastern Institute of Technology wants more people to ask. She hass tracked down the stories of 64 Hawkes Bay women who served overseas in The Great War for an exhibition at the MTG Hawke’s Bay. The nurses, teachers and volunteers travelled far from the land they knew, to war-torn England, Egypt, Greece, and France.
Kay Morris Matthews wants to hear from anyone who can help with her research. Email KMorris@eit.ac.nz
Topics: arts, health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: WW1, MTG
Duration: 9'40"

13:10
Film with Kailey Carruthers
BODY:
Kailey Carruthers reviews Pixar film Inside Out, romantic comedy Man Up, and Brian Wilson from The Beach Boys biopic Love and Mercy.
EXTENDED BODY:
Kailey Carruthers reviews the new Pixar film Inside Out, romantic comedy Man Up, and Brian Wilson from The Beach Boys biopic Love and Mercy.
Topics: arts, music
Regions:
Tags: film, Pixar, Simon Pegg, Lake Bell, Pete Docter, Mindy Kaling, Bill Hader, Phyllis Smith, Lewis Black, Brian Wilson, Paul Dano, The Beach Boys, parenting, John Cusack, Ben Palmer, Nira Park, mental health
Duration: 19'34"

13:30
Unnaming a glacier
BODY:
Sasha Huber is travelling the world, unnaming things named after nineteenth century Swiss-born naturalist and glaciologist Louis Agassiz. Her latest unnaming ceremony has been held in New Zealand, at the former Agassiz Glacier, between the Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers on the West Coast. Ngāi Tahu representatives accompanied Sasha and her film crew to the area for the ceremony. Sasha Huber is in Wellington on an artist's residency and her trip is part of a long term international project called Demounting Agassiz. Sasha's exhibit Agassiz Down Under will show at Te Whare Hēra gallery
EXTENDED BODY:

Jeff Mahuika (Kāti Māhaki, Poutini Kāi Tahu) and Sasha Huber after the karakia, symbolically unnaming the Agassiz Glacier. Photo by Tom Hoyle
Sasha Huber is travelling the world, unnaming things named after nineteenth century Swiss-born naturalist and glaciologist Louis Agassiz.
Her latest unnaming ceremony has been held in New Zealand, at the former Agassiz Glacier, between the Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers on the West Coast. Ngāi Tahu representatives accompanied Sasha and her film crew to the area for the ceremony.
Sasha Huber is in Wellington on an artist's residency and her trip is part of a long term international project called Demounting Agassiz. Sasha's exhibit Agassiz Down Under will show at Te Whare Hēra gallery.
Topics: arts, history
Regions: West Coast
Tags: place names, glaciers, Louis Agassiz
Duration: 11'21"

13:45
OSH on the dancefloor
BODY:
The tougher new Health and Safety at Work legislation coming into force soon means performing arts spaces and companies will have to watch their step. Dance companies and teachers have been talking to experts in the field, to get some idea of what they're in for under the new legislation. Lawyer Scott Ratuki from Tompkins Wake and the Executive Director of Dance Aotearoa New Zealand Dr Tania Kopytko talked to Lynn Freeman about the changes.
EXTENDED BODY:
The tougher new Health and Safety at Work legislation coming into force soon means performing arts spaces and companies will have to watch their step. Dance companies and teachers have been talking to experts in the field, to get some idea of what they're in for under the new legislation. Lawyer Scott Ratuki from Tompkins Wake and the Executive Director of Dance Aotearoa New Zealand Dr Tania Kopytko talked to Lynn Freeman about the changes.
Topics: arts, law
Regions:
Tags: dance, health and safety
Duration: 16'50"

14:05
The Laugh Track - Paul Waggott
BODY:
Actor Paul Waggott is a constant presence on New Zealand stages, and Radio New Zealand Drama. He's part of theatre company My Accomplice, and will appear in the upcoming production at Circa Theatre, in Wellington, of The Ugly One by German Playwright Marius von Mayenburg. His comedy favourites are Flanders and Swann, Dara O'Briain, Bill Bailey, and Stewart Lee.
EXTENDED BODY:
Actor Paul Waggott is a constant presence on New Zealand stages, and Radio New Zealand Drama. He’s part of theatre company My Accomplice, and will appear in the upcoming production at Circa Theatre, in Wellington, of The Ugly One by German Playwright Marius von Mayenburg. His comedy favourites are Flanders and Swann, Dara O'Briain, Bill Bailey, and Stewart Lee.

Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre, comedy, Circa
Duration: 20'49"

14:35
How to Catch a Grim Reaper
BODY:
Having gathered a stack of awards for her poetry and a book of hers translated into French, German and Spanish, Helen Vivienne Fletcher has now set her sights on writing for the stage. Her poetry has appeared in print and on line, and she's also got several e-picture books to her name, including Jenny No-Knickers and Do Fruit Worry About Getting Fat? She's about to attend the opening night of her first play, How to Catch a Grim Reaper, which is part of the 2015 Young and Hungry Festival of New Theatre.
EXTENDED BODY:
Having gathered a stack of awards for her poetry and a book of hers translated into French, German and Spanish, Helen Vivienne Fletcher has now set her sights on writing for the stage.
Her poetry has appeared in print and on line, and she's also got several e-picture books to her name, including Jenny No-Knickers and Do Fruit Worry About Getting Fat? She's about to attend the opening night of her first play, How to Catch a Grim Reaper, which is part of the 2015 Young and Hungry Festival of New Theatre.
Helen Vivienne Fletcher talks to Lynn Freeman.
Topics: arts, author interview, technology
Regions:
Tags: poetry, comedy, bats, acting, writing
Duration: 10'04"

14:42
Author Charlotte Grimshaw - Starlight Peninsula
BODY:
Few New Zealand novelists tackle contemporary political satire, but once again Auckland writer Charlotte Grimshaw takes it on. Charlotte's latest novel Starlight Peninsula, introduces us to Eloise Hay. She works in TV, her husband has left her for an actress, and she is overwhelmed by both that loss and another earlier one that catches up with her.
Topics: arts, books, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Starlight Peninsula, media, satire
Duration: 11'53"

14:50
The Colourful World of Mica Still
BODY:
If you've ever seen the work of Mica Still, you won't be able to walk past without a smile on your face. The US born, Wellington-based artist loves taking her art to the streets, and in recent years has made the transition from black and white photography and fine art, to an explosion of colourful creatures that can be found at various locations across the breadth of the country.
EXTENDED BODY:
If you've ever seen the work of Mica Still, you won't be able to walk past without a smile on your face.
The US-born, Wellington-based artist loves taking her art to the streets, and in recent years has made the transition from black and white photography and fine art, to an explosion of colourful creatures that can be found at various locations across the breadth of the country.
She has been producing street art for the past four years and says she has grown in confidence through encouragement from other street artists, including Sean Duffel, who often invites her to come out and paint.
Colour is a major feature of her work, and arriving at a vibrant palette has been part of a natural progression which coincided with a divorce and a brand new start in New Zealand. Mica applies opposing colours and shapes that come together as a collage of animals—usually wolves, bears and the occasional ghost-like creature, and you’ll sometimes find a rabbit or even a My Little Pony in the mix.
“Colour kind of took over and I just never looked back. I wanted to produce work that made people feel happy [because] life is very serious and it can be overwhelming.”
For Mica, it is the wolf motif that continues to make an appearance in her work and she cites their strength, sense of family and their independence as the reason to draw inspiration.
Although quietly spoken, one can’t help but feel that one of these fierce, yet playful animals lives inside of her, driving her towards the next piece—a place where her vivid imagination takes over; one animal will morph into another, until the completed image consists of a running pack of wolves, leaving the viewer desperate to run alongside in the hopes to catch up and join in the fun.
She refers to the medium as addictive, with the only problem being that it’s impossible to stop people tagging over the top of the work. She readily accepts that this is part of the process and has also grown accustomed to the regular interruptions and the stop-starts of having to make way for vehicles passing through, and people stopping to chat.
There is an immense amount of satisfaction and freedom to be gained from making street art and Mica is adamant that she will only paint if given that creative freedom to do what she does best.
“You’re hiring me to do what I do [and] at this stage, I don’t want to be going out and doing work just for the sake of it.”
The street artist with a fine arts background never works without consent, despite being asked by concerned citizens as to whether she has been granted permission. She is also careful about how she chooses to label herself, and the context of her work.
“I would never enter the debate of being a graffiti artist. That’s not the realm that I’ve ever been in, or pretend to be in, [but] I naturally go under street art because it’s part of my practice.
Mica values becoming part of what she sees as a growing community of street artists in New Zealand and encourages other artists not to shy away from the medium, if it interests them.
“We get jealous of each other and we openly say it, but it pushes us to work really hard and get better. You have to be socially confident, savvy on social media [and] you have to find time to produce the work and then promote yourself… the beauty of doing street art is that you’re not alone.”
Mica talks with Sonia Sly about her work.
All images courtesy of Mica Still
You can find out more about Mica via her website: http://www.micastill.com
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: street art, community, urban, women, graffiti, Mica Still, Sonia Sly, Sean Duffel, animals, fine art
Duration: 9'05"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:42 2015 International Award for Public Art
Public art works tend to be polarizing - loved or loathed, embraced as a welcome addition to a community or resented because of the cost or the look of the work. Should the public have a say in substantial public art works, or is that a decision best left to others? Lewis Biggs has just judged the 2015 International Award for Public Art in Auckland. He is a former director of the Tate Liverpool - the city was the 2008 European Capital of Culture which saw many millions of pounds poured into its regeneration.
12:50 Hawke’s Bay and East Coast women at war
“What did you do in the War Gran?” That's a question researcher Professor Kay Morris Matthews from the Eastern Institute of Technology wants more people to ask. She's tracked down the stories of 64 Hawkes Bay women who served overseas in The Great War for an exhibition at the MTG Hawke’s Bay. The nurses, teachers and volunteers travelled far from the land they knew, to war-torn England, Egypt, Greece, and France.

Lonsdale House Hospital, London, March 1918, photographer unknown, Spencer Collection, Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust, Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi, [90314]
Kay Morris Matthews wants to hear from anyone who can help with her research. Email KMorris@eit.ac.nz
1:10 Film with Kailey Carruthers
Kailey Carruthers reviews Pixar film Inside Out, romantic comedy Man Up, and Brian Wilson from The Beach Boys biopic Love and Mercy.
[video] https://youtu.be/yRUAzGQ3nSY
1:30 Unnaming a glacier
Sasha Huber is travelling the world, unnaming things named after nineteenth century Swiss-born naturalist and glaciologist Louis Agassiz. Her latest unnaming ceremony has been held in New Zealand, at the former Agassiz Glacier, between the Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers on the West Coast. Ngāi Tahu representatives accompanied Sasha and her film crew to the area for the ceremony. Sasha Huber is in Wellington on an artist's residency and her trip is part of a long term international project called Demounting Agassiz. Sasha's exhibit Agassiz Down Under will show at Te Whare Hēra gallery.

Jeff Mahuika (Kāti Māhaki, Poutini Kāi Tahu) and Sasha Huber after the karakia, symbolically unnaming the Agassiz Glacier. Photo by Tom Hoyle
1:45 OSH on the dancefloor
The tougher new Health and Safety at Work legislation coming into force soon means performing arts spaces and companies will have to watch their step. Dance companies and teachers have been talking to experts in the field, to get some idea of what they're in for under the new legislation. Lawyer Scott Ratuki from Tompkins Wake and the Executive Director of Dance Aotearoa New Zealand Dr Tania Kopytko talked to Lynn Freeman about the changes.
2:04 The Laugh Track – Paul Waggott
Actor Paul Waggott is a constant presence on New Zealand stages, and Radio New Zealand Drama. He’s part of theatre company My Accomplice, and will appear in the upcoming production at Circa Theatre, in Wellington, of The Ugly One by German Playwright Marius von Mayenburg.

2:35 How to Catch a Grim Reaper
Having gathered a stack of awards for her poetry and a book of hers translated into French, German and Spanish, Helen Vivienne Fletcher has now set her sights on writing for the stage. Her poetry has appeared in print and on line, and she's also got several e-picture books to her name, including Jenny No-Knickers and Do Fruit Worry About Getting Fat? She's about to attend the opening night of her first play, How to Catch a Grim Reaper, which is part of the 2015 Young and Hungry Festival of New Theatre.
2:42 Author Charlotte Grimshaw - Starlight Peninsula
Few New Zealand novelists tackle contemporary political satire, but once again Auckland writer Charlotte Grimshaw takes it on. Charlotte’s latest novel Starlight Peninsula, introduces us to Eloise Hay. She works in TV, her husband has left her for an actress, and she is overwhelmed by both that loss and another earlier one that catches up with her.
2:50 The Colourful World of Mica Still
If you've ever seen the work of Mica Still, you won't be able to walk past without a smile on your face. The US born, Wellington-based artist loves taking her art to the streets, and in recent years has made the transition from black and white photography and fine art, to an explosion of colourful creatures that can be found at various locations across the breadth of the country
[gallery:1249]
3:05 The Drama Hour
The Drama Hour revisits a classic, The Legend Returns, starring Helen Moulder and recorded live on stage at Circa Theatre.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Judith Durham
Song: When Starlight Fades
Composer: J. Durham, H. Cock
Album: Let Me Find Love
Label: Musicoast
Played at: 12:12
Artist: Starlight Express Original Cast
Song: I Am The Starlight
Composer: Andrew Lloyd Webber, Richard Stilgoe
Album: Starlight Express
Label: Polydor
Played at: 12:38
Artist: Zoe Muth
Song: Starlight Hotel
Composer: Zoe Muth
Album: Zoe Muth and The Lost High Rollers
Label: Signature Sounds Recordings
Played at: 12:58
Artist: Mëstar
Song: Mr Starlight
Album: Shut the Squizwot Factories Down
Label: Arch Hill
Played at: 1:10
Artist: The Beach Boys
Song: Wouldn't It Be Nice
Composer: Asher, Love, Wilson
Album: Pet Sounds
Label: Capitol
Played at: 1:26
Artist: Muse
Song: Starlight
Composer: Bellamy
Album: Black Holes and Revelations
Label: Warner
Played at: 1:42
Artist: Joan Armatrading
Song: Starlight
Composer: Joan Armatrading
Album: Starlight
Label: 429 Records
Played at: 1:58
Artist: Very Unique Experience
Song: Starlight
Composer: Latimer
Album: Everyone
Label: Vue
Played at: 2:04
Artist: Flanders and Swann
Song: The Gasman Cometh (Live)
Album: The Best of British Comedy: 60 Golden Comedy Classics
Label: Disky
Played at: 2:25
Artist: Weezer
Song: Starlight
Composer: Rivers Cuomo
Album: Hash Pipe
Label: Geffen
Played at: 2:37
Artist: Ann Howard Jones & Moira Anderson
Song: I Can Give You The Starlight
Played at: 2:58
Artist: Miles Davis
Song: Stella by Starlight
Composer: N. Washington, V. Young
Album: '58 Sessions Featuring Stella by Starlight
Label: Columbia
Played at: 3:58

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A discussion marking 30 years since the sinking of the Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior in Auckland Harbour on 10 July 1985. It's part of a Victoria University forum in which lawyer and former journalist Linda Clark chairs a 30 year retrospective debate featuring key parties in the post sinking arbitrations and negotiations.

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | Spiritual Outlook===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

17:00
On a wing and a prayer
BODY:
"Every three minutes an MAF plane is taking off or landing somewhere around the world…we fly to more destinations than any airline - over 2,500 worldwide." - Mark Fox, CEO MAF New Zealand
EXTENDED BODY:

MAF New Zealand CEO Mark Fox with ZK MAF at Ardmore Airport, south of Auckland. Image taken by Lisa Thompson
Every three minutes an MAF plane is taking off or landing somewhere around the world… we fly to more destinations than any airline – over 2,500 worldwide.

– Mark Fox, CEO MAF New Zealand
Over the past 70 years, Mission Aviation Fellowship has grown from just one plane, to a fleet of 140 aircraft. And New Zealand provides many of the pilots who fly the Christian organisation’s aircraft around the world assisting missions, churches and aid and development agencies to share the love of God. However, none of MAF’s operational planes have ever been based in New Zealand.

But this all changed in March 2015, when a Cessna 206 touched down at Ardmore Airfield, south of Auckland. MAF New Zealand acquired the plane after it was retired from MAF work in Australia and two experienced pilots made the three day journey with the Cessna from Cairns to Auckland. After being registered by the Civil Aviation Authority, ZK-MAF will now be based in Blenheim and will be used to train, test and prepare Kiwi pilots for the challenging conditions they will face overseas. However, MAF NZ CEO Mark Fox says the plane will also be used to raise the profile of the organisation’s work. “We’re going to use it to show the public… taking it to the air shows, all the airports around the country over the next couple of years… we want to use the plane to leverage our profile… and to inspire people to serve,” he says.
And one person who has already taken up the call is MAF pilot Lisa Curran. Following her father's advice 'to get a trade', Lisa originally trained as an Occupational Therapist in New Zealand. However, in the 1990s, Lisa’s work took her to Florida in the United States and it was here that her passion for aviation developed. “There was one defining morning where I saw a group taking off very early and I thought ‘Lord, I’d love to serve you with flying’… as my passion for flying continued I thought I’ve got to make a decision here,” she says.
So her passion became her career after she was approached back in New Zealand by Mark Fox and asked to join MAF. After gaining her commercial pilots licence and a Diploma of Operational Aviation and Applied Management, Lisa was accepted into the organisation. Five years ago she moved to Arnhem Land in Australia’s Northern Territory. Recently appointed Chief Pilot for the region, Lisa and a team of approximately 16 other pilot families help cover an area of 97,000 square kilometres.
Serving mainly the indigenous Yolngu people, Lisa says one day is never like the next and MAF pilots can be described as ‘jacks-of-all-trades’. “You are the plane washer, refueler, ticket taker and cabin crew and the pilot,” she says. “You’re also the chaplain… but we’re quite trusted. MAF has been in parts of Arnhem Land for 40 years and so the uniform and name stands for that trust and we’re very fortunate we have such a strong relationship with the local people.”
Listen here to a longer interview with Lisa Curran.
Mission Aviation Fellowship
For 70 years, the Christian Aviation organisation has been flying to the most isolated places on earth, sharing Christ's love, offering transportation, aiding development and providing training. But the organisation also partners with other charities and NGOs to bring essential medical supplies, relief teams and spiritual care to thousands of people cut off by natural disasters such as the recent Nepal earthquakes.
Videos courtesy Mission Aviation Fellowship.
Topics: education, transport
Regions:
Tags: aviation, aid missions, relief flights, spiritual care, missionaries, Cessna
Duration: 25'06"

17:00
On a Wing and a Prayer with Lisa Curran
BODY:
Find out how New Zealand pilots and their families are helping bring aid and spiritual care to those living in isolation worldwide, through Mission Aviation Fellowship.
Topics: spiritual practices, education, transport, international aid and development
Regions:
Tags: aviation, aid missions, relief flights, spiritual care, missionaries, Cessna
Duration: 23'16"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
Manu Tioriori - Regan and Sasha Perry
BODY:
Regan and Sasha Perry are brothers, fathers and musicians. Roots and Reggae music has been their signature sound, but their music style is as eclectic as their upbringing. They moved from town to town but settled in Te Kuiti and grew up in the tight-knit Māori community. Both brothers share their story with Justine Murray in part two of the Te Ahi Kaa music series, Manu Tioriori.
EXTENDED BODY:

Regan and Sasha Perry are brothers, fathers and musicians. Roots and Reggae music has been their signature sound, but their music style is as eclectic as their upbringing. Both brothers share their story with Justine Murray in part two of the Te Ahi Kaa music series, Manu Tioriori.
Regan and Sasha Perry have lived in towns all across Aotearoa, but it's Te Kuiti in the King Country they call home. The siblings have been writing songs for years, inspired largely perhaps by the tight-knit Māori community they grew up in. They mention the whanau names in Te Kuiti who were well known for their musicianship, many of the amazing guitarists as they describe, worked in the local meat works.
At 13 years old, according to Sasha, Regan became famous in the small town for this guitar skills, they busked on the streets and played music at the school galas. It wasn't always idyllic for the brothers who lived in foster homes at one stage of their lives, and were homeless too.
They penned the song All Against Me, that speaks to that experience.
We were asking each other have you got somewhere to sleep? We both said no, and so we wrote a song about it. We have both been homeless, we both know those feelings. But even though we are pale skinned, once you start talking to us, you know there is a lot more aroha inside of us than your average person. We are real people...that's what Te Kuiti teaches you, just be humble.
Regan and Sasha Perry.

Regan would eventually leave Te Kuiti to do a music course in Hamilton. Sasha would leave too to begin a career as a television Director and Producer, he worked on the show Roots Music in the early days of Māori Television.
Regan would go on to play with Cornerstone Roots for ten years and tour with the band in Aotearoa, Japan and Australia. Over the years he has performed with the likes of Katchafire, Kora and Rhombus.
Inevitably Regan would move into forging his own career. In 2009 his debut album Wiser was released.
I'm not doing it (music) thinking we've got to make this hit, and its gotta have this in it. I don't think its ever been like that. There's got to be some kind of balance in your life where you're not focusing just on that, you've got to keep everything else going in your life. With my dad passing away, I said to myself I've got to say something, so I went out to say stuff really, we both get to say it together, in harmony, it's great.
Regan Perry on songwriting.

Sasha plays regular gigs with his band F.T.W and performs as lead vocalist with his band F.T.W with Regan at his side as lead guitarist. Their brother bond is pretty special, Sasha explains the matching F.T.W tattoos they have on their necks.
Mine was originally for F*** the World, because I was pretty angry at the time, and then we've had a million versions of what it means. Feed the Whanau, Finally Truth Wins, Free the Weed. I think we use it as our symbol that we are artists for life.
Sasha Perry.

Waiata featured include: F.T.W, Back Then, Jah Jah, Slide,Broken Bones from the album Maui (2013), Jah Magic by Sticks and Shanty from the album Māori Reggae Volume 1 (2001) All Against Me by Regan and Sasha Perry as recorded live, 2015.
Topics: music
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: Regan Perry, Sasha Perry
Duration: 31'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | One In Five===
=DESCRIPTION=

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:06
A hell of a good time
BODY:
Bridget Chamberlain has been taking part in a training programme run by Hell Pizza and IHC. The placement gives young people with intellectual disabilities the chance to gain practical skills and to experience a workplace environment. Katy Gosset ventures into hell to see Bridget at work.
EXTENDED BODY:

She's been in hell but Bridget Chamberlain has enjoyed every moment. The Christchurch woman has just undertaken a six-week training programme run by Hell Pizza and IHC. The scheme, Active in Hell, offers young people with intellectual disabilities a chance to develop job skills and to enjoy the camaraderie of a workplace.
For Bridget, it has proved a great opportunity. "I'm absolutely loving it. It's amazing. It's a fantastic place to be." She says part of the attraction has been learning to work quickly in a fast-paced environment. "At first it was challenging for me but now I just find it really fun."

Extracting the dough can be a sticky, tricky job
Bridget was already a keen baker with an award-winning chocolate devil's cake and a host of other goodies to her name. And she realised that the kitchen skills involved in this programme could prove useful in her baking career. But she's also enjoyed the friendliness of the staff and she says her mother has noticed a difference in her as well. "Between going to work and coming home from work I'm always on a real buzz. I'm just really super excited and super happy." And she says it’s also improved her confidence and self esteem in other areas.
The Manager of Hell Pizza in Riccarton, Chris Bullion, says he and the branch owner jumped at the chance to be involved in the scheme. He took responsibility for Bridget’s training and found her to be a quick learner. "She's picked up the techniques rather quickly and the last sessions [ ] she just been faster and faster as well so we think we've done something right."
Chris Bullion says she's has been a pleasure to work with and he would be very open to taking another Active in Hell trainee. And, whilst each placement is for a six week fixed period, he is looking into the possibility of further employment for Bridget, should shifts become available.
"Just Sitting Around"
Rawdon Wallace has been able to take it easy for the last few sessions of Bridget's training period. And he says that was both his and Bridget's goal from the start. As her support worker at Idea Services (a branch of IHC), he was initially involved in helping her adapt to the new workplace, clarifying the tasks for her and helping her to complete them. But as the placement went on, he found he was able to take a step back. "It’s got to the point now where Bridget's perfectly competent in all the roles she has and all the tasks she's given."
And Bridget feels the same way. "It’s his job to just sit around and not do anything now because I feel like I've become independent enough to be working on my own."
Rawdon Wallace runs a Learning and Life Skills service for young people with intellectual disabilities and part of that involves providing supported employment opportunities. He says Bridget's interest in baking and her inter-personal skills made her a good fit for the Hell Pizza placement. "She's very social, very chatty, which is really good in a banter-orientated workplace such as this one." And he says a performance review, halfway through the six week training period, showed everyone was happy with the process.

Left: Riccarton Branch Manager, Chris Bullion, has been responsible for training Bridget. Middle: Rawdon Wallace, Bridget's support worker from Idea Services. Right: Hell Pizza's General Manager, Ben Cumming
Mr Wallace said another positive to the placement is that it is a paid work opportunity. He says, while unpaid work experience has its place, IDEA Services require that their users get no less than minimum wage for any supported work placement. "We think it’s very, very important both for our employers to see our young people as valued employees and also for the young people to value themselves."
Rolling Out the Dough Nationwide
Active in Hell began as a pilot scheme when Hell Pizza catered for a party run by Active, a group that is part of Idea Services in Wellington. The General Manager of Hell Pizza, Ben Cumming, says the company got talking about other ways to help the organisation and the first trainees were taken on. The idea gained momentum after the company shot a series of on-line films.
He says Hell Pizza initially planned to take 64 trainees, one for each store, but he now believes it might be an ongoing project. He believes its a good way for branches to support their local communities and he's hopeful that other companies might follow their lead. "Initially people are probably quite sceptical and think, 'Well, how much time is it going to take up and how's it going to hinder the performance of my business'." "But that hasn't really been as big an issue as what we thought it would be."
Ben Cumming says that, with the support of Idea Services and their staff, Hell employees have been able to keep the quality of the training high and roll the programme out to more centres. "So I think, the more that people hear about that, the more those barriers will be broken down."
Topics: disability, business, food, life and society
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: intellectual disability, IHC, Hell Pizza, Idea Services, supported employment
Duration: 24'24"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:35 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)

===7:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical Hour One - 5 July 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to learn about the colourful and often dramatic events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 54'05"

21:05
Sounds Historical Hour Two - 5 July 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to lean about the colourful and often dramatic events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56'49"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:09 Today in New Zealand History 4’22”
Otago University, the first in New Zealand opens, 5 July 1871.
8:15 Artist: Paul Lestre Group 2’57”
Song: Little White Lies
Composer: Donaldson
Album: A Nite at the Hi Diddle Griddle
Label: Stebbing
8:21 Homework
1. Which town has an international airport but never had a railway?
2. Which sport was introduced to Australia by a New Zealand team?
8:22 5 July 1974 7’34”
On this day in 1974 John Marshall announced he was standing down as leader of the National Party as he felt he no longer had the support of the party which was concerned about its chances in the 1975 election. Rob Muldoon became leader and took National to a landslide victory over Bill Rowling’s Labour government in 1975. In this extract from a 1974 interview Sir John Marshal reflects on the high points of his political career.
8:31 Artist: Sharon O’Neill 3’27”
Song: Don’t Say No To Tomorrow
Composer: O’Neill
Album: n/a
Label: CBS BA 461 965
Telethon Song 1979
The 1979 Telethon raised $2,767,351 [$16 million] for the Year of the Child.
8:37 Just One Second! 5’24”
On Monday you may have noticed the day seemed longer than usual. We got an extra second so that clocks can keep up with the time of the day as defined by positions of the sun. So-called leap seconds are added from time to time to make up for the fact that the Earth is gradually slowing down and the day is getting longer. It happens in July 1991 too, and then Tim Armstrong of the DSIR explained to Geoff Robinson of Morning Report what it was all about.
8:44 Artist: Company of “Rush” 2’45”
Song: A New Day Dawns
Composer: David John/ Kevin Lynch
Album: Rush
Label: Rush CD 001
Set in the Otago gold fields in 1862, this powerful musical tells the moving story of immigrant gold-diggers and their quest for instant fortune. “Rush!” was conceived by David John after settling in Arrowtown in 1979. His book and lyrics were ably matched by the late arranger and composer Kevin Lynch. The musical had its world premiere at Dunedin's Regent Theatre on September 24th, 1998. It has so far been performed to over 40,000 people.
8:47 Launch of TV3 3’03”
On 27 Nov 1989 TV3 was launched. In this Morning Report item introduced by Kim Hill Phillip Sherry greets the viewers and Mark Hannan reports on the programming. Kel Geddis, TV3 head of Network Programming, talks about what TV3 has to offer as an independent television channel. TVNZ director of programming, Graham Wilson, expresses confidence in TVNZ placings in the ratings
8:50 1950's Advertising 0’51”
An example of a Milo commercial from the 1950s.
8:52 Bookshelf
Taheke: An account of the Hokianga in the life of New Zealand painter Annette Isbey by Denys Trousell. Published by Brick Row Publishing, ISBN 989 0 908595 85 3
8:53 War Report 43 6’13”
A newspaper report on recruiting in early July 1915. An extract from a letter written from Quinn’s Pots by Colonel Malone in mid-July and memories of tunneling at Quinn’s Post. Extract from diary of Colonel Malone at Quinn’s Post.
Music:
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There’s a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
Artist: Courtland and Jeffries
Song: Oh! It’s a Lovely War
Composer: Long/Scott
Album: Songs of World War 1
Label: Goentertainment 557331
9:06 As I Remember 5’48”
The Silence written by Edward Jamieson who was a New Zealand surgeon based in London during World War Two. The story is read by his nephew Ross Jamieson.
9:14 What’s Wrong with the Media? 12’59”
A 1984 interview in which Brian Priestley, Reader in Journalism at Canterbury University discusses the topic with Wayne Mowat.

9:27 Homework
1. Which town has an international airport but never had a railway?
2. Which sport was introduced to Australia by a New Zealand team?
9:28 Artist: Phil Garland 3’28”
Song: The Old Station Gate
Composer: Garland
Album: Wind in the Tussock
Label: Kiwi CD SLC 200
9:32 Swaggie and Bushman 27’14”
From a 1975 Spectrum programme Bob Edwards recall his days on the swag and as a bushman in conversation with Jack Perkins.

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

The Rise of the Machines: Five narratives that explore the dawn of the modern age, when science and engineering and the growth of cities combined to make the world emphatically noisier - and we started to worry about its ill-effects (5 of 6, BBC)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274382

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 05 Jul 2015

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Whakamahia ai mātou ngā pihikete ki te rapu māramatanga ki te āhua o tō whakamahi i tēnei paetukutuku, ki te whakapai hoki i tō whai wāhi mai. Ki te rapu kōrero anō pānuitia te kaupapahere tūmataiti.

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