Radio New Zealand National. 2015-08-09. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

09 August 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday; 3:05 The Concentrators by Sue Francis (2 of 2, RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Biggest Kid in Class, by David Somerset, told by Grant Tilly; Peer Gynt and the Trolls, by David Somerset, told by Peter Vere-Jones; Time of the Mammoths, by Leanne Radojkovich, told by Turei Reedy; Operation Flax, by Diana Noonan, told by Maria Walker; Fishing with Spiderwebs, by Lina Nelisi, told by Tausili Mose; Living in the City, by Phillipa Werry, told by Sean Allen

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, music and including: 7:43 The Week in Parliament: An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ) 8:10 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ) 9:06 Mediawatch: Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:15
Putting life into Palmerston North
BODY:
An Australian initiative called Placemaking which brings ordinary places to life is being tried in Palmerston North. Peter Smith is a Placemaking consultant and former Chief Executive of the Adelaide City Council. He's been invited to the city of 80,000 people to share his experience of implementing the concept in Adelaide.
Topics: business, economy, environment
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: Palmerston North, placemaking
Duration: 9'16"

07:25
Call to protect Cook Island Maori language
BODY:
Language advocates have called for more commitment from the government for Cook Islanders to celebrate their language and culture. Out of the 62,000 Cook Islanders who live in New Zealand, only about eight-thousand say they can speak the language. Daniela Maoate-Cox has been following the issue and she says the language is in a dire state.
Topics: Pacific, language
Regions:
Tags: Cook Islands, Cook Islands Maori
Duration: 5'01"

07:30
The Week in Parliament for Sunday 9 August 2015
BODY:
Parliament in a one-week adjournment, with no Select Committee meetings held - so we look at an allegation from New Zealand First that the Speaker told Winston Peters to "Shut up". We also interview Deputy Clerk of the House Rafael Gonzalez-Montero about a changed format for this year's Estimates Debate.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'03"

07:47
Commentator Mark Reason on last night's Rugby Championship match
BODY:
Mark Reason - sports columnist for Fairfax New Zealand - on the Wallabies taking the Rugby Championship.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby, All Blacks, Bledisloe Cup, wallabies
Duration: 3'47"

07:50
Southern hemisphere's first dark sky reserve
BODY:
New Zealand's Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve is the southern hemisphere's first dark sky reserve, and the world's biggest. Steve Butler is from the Royal Astronomical Society of NZ Dark Skies Group.
Topics: environment
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Mackenzie District Council, Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve, Royal Astronomical Society of NZ, astronomy
Duration: 8'20"

08:12
Insight for 9 August 2015 - Gay Rights Beyond Marriage
BODY:
Alex Ashton considers if same-sex marriage has changed what it is to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or trans in NZ
EXTENDED BODY:
Many in the queer community fear same-sex marriage is being used as a universal solution for the challenges still confronting gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals.
Advocates argue two years of marriage equality have had little impact on alarming youth suicide rates and ongoing prejudice and has swept more pressing issues out of the limelight.
Listen to Insight: Gay Rights Beyond Marriage
The passing of Labour MP Louisa Wall's Marriage Amendment Bill, in April 2013, marked a societal turning point for many.
The 77 - 44 vote was greeted by rapturous applause and a rousing rendition of the waiata Po Karekare Ana. There was an air of celebration among the politicians and the packed public gallery.
The first same-sex marriages were held three months later. In the next two years, nearly 1800 same-sex couples tied the knot in New Zealand.
However, some, such as Wellington gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth worker, Kassie Hartendorp, believe the legislation has changed little on the ground.
"All in all, I don't think marriage equality would have any impact in their day to day lives. There's a reason why we still run support groups.
"I'm definitely not making the argument that we shouldn't have marriage and it's all bad - but it's really important to note that it was the most symbolic, easiest thing to do, and was treated as a final frontier, whereas there are still a lot of things we need to be addressing in more depth."
She said queer people still battled discrimination, abuse and disproportionate levels of mental illness.
And, in regards to mental health, research indicated queer youth were having a much harder time than their straight counterparts.
A study published by University of Auckland researchers last year found one in five same-sex and both sexl attracted youth had attempted suicide in the past year - a rate five times higher than their straight counterparts. Nearly half had thought about killing themselves, and just short of 60% had self harmed.
Miss Harterndorp said the figures showed New Zealand was far from an all-inclusive society.
Those who agree with her include Broden Packer, a 19-year-old Wellington university student.
He said he had been attacked three times and was bullied by his peers over his sexuality.
"One time it was me and my two female friends... We were all targetted by a group of straight males in their 20s, just shouting 'faggot'."
On another occasion, he had his jaw broken after being punched in the face. The perpetrator was given community service.
However, Broden Packer said today's environment was still a far cry from that faced by queer people 40 years ago.
Back in 1973, when Ngahuia Te Awekotuku was denied entry to the United States for being a lesbian - or 'known sexual deviant' - she was frustrated.
She took to a microphone at the University of Auckland, and asked her peers if they were comfortable with her treatment. She told them if they were not, to meet her afterwards. About 11 did, and about 40 came to the second meeting the following week.
That was the birth of gay liberation in this country.
Back then it was illegal for men to have sex with one another, and there were no laws preventing discrimination based on sexuality.
Same-sex marriage seemed a far-fetched idea, and it was not something activists aspired to, either.
"Marriage - the actual notion of marriage - has its history in heterosexual economics and church sacrimentalism," said Ms Te Awekotuku.
"We sat around in the early days and talked a lot about the notion of marriage, and most of us thought, well it's what a man and a woman does. It's not what we want to do, because why would we want parity with them?"
Ms Te Awekotuku said same-sex marriage was a triumph for those who had fought for it, but it had not created a landslide change in public opinion towards queer people.
"What concerns me is that in the rugby clubs, in the league clubs, in the rural communities, the kitchen, out the back, on the marae, down at the beach - within those parts of my world, which are traditional, and conservative, it's okay if you're like 'that', but you shouldn't flaunt it.
"Getting married is flaunting it."
Ms Te Awekotuku said for queer Maori - or takatapui - in particular, it would be another 40 years before any significant change happened.
Her concerns were echoed by Elizabeth Kerekere, the founder and chair of Tiwhanawhana, a takatapui community group in Wellington.
"For some, [marriage equality] is really significant, it was something they had fought hard for, that they wanted in their lives, so I think that is a great thing that they are able to have that and all of the legal protections, and the status that comes with being a married person in this country.
"But for our young people getting bullied in schools, and schools not knowing how to deal with homophobic and transphobic bullying and just pretending it's not happening - same-sex marriage? Not an impact at all."
Shelley Howard, a transgender woman living in the Hutt Valley north of Wellington presented for much of her life as a male. She joined the military, married, and had three sons. "The whole routine," as she called it.
She said same-sex marriage was a win for gays and lesbians, but did little to advance the rights of other queer people, namely those not on the standard gender spectrum.
"We're the forgotten minority."

"It's understandable in some ways, because lesbianism and homosexuality are about sexuality. It's problematic for transgender, because our issue is not sexuality. Sexuality becomes another issue later on. But recognising us first for our gender dysphoric condition is our first major step."
Ms Howard is another who worries about the mental health outcomes for queer youth, especially for young transgender people, who, she argues, still face a huge amount of discrimination.
"The people who should be supporting them and assisting and aiding them, the people in responsibility - parents, counsellors, therapists, teachers - all of these people should be reliable, informed sources of advice and help to the transgendered.
"But when you end up with the principal in a prestigious school making statements that he has no homosexuals in his college, then you really have to wonder how much more we have to do.
"Things have not changed at the coal face, particularly for transgender, and legislation will never do that."
Follow Insight on Twitter

Topics: inequality
Regions:
Tags: gay, queer, same-sex marriage, discrimination, sexuality
Duration: 26'52"

08:40
Craig Sisterson - Kiwi Crime Writing
BODY:
The founder of the Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel, Craig Sisterson, reflects on this year's crop of finalists and the state of Kiwi crime writing. Craig regularly reviews crime novels and interviews authors for his blog Kiwi Crime.
EXTENDED BODY:

The founder of the Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel, Craig Sisterson, reflects on this year’s crop of finalists and the state of Kiwi crime writing.
Craig regularly reviews crime novels and interviews authors for his blog Kiwi Crime.
On Sunday Morning with Wallace Chapman we asked for listener's favourite crime novels after interviewing founder and current judge of The Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel, Craig Sisterson. And they responded enthusiastically.
Eamonn emailed in to say:
"My favourite crime novel is The Friends of Eddie Coyle by George V Higgins. Also enjoy almost anything by Elmore Leonard. Badly missing both (sadly RIP). Any suggestions?"
We certainly do.
Kath texted in to say that she loves "Graham Hurley's Faraday crime series set in Portsmouth".
A novel called The Black Dahlia is based on a dark true story, and has its fans:
"The best crime novel is The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy. No contest." - Anonymous
"I remember the night I began my first James Ellroy novel, The Black Dahlia. It felt like I'd been picked up and slammed against the wall and held there until I finished the damn thing. A night without sleep. Some of his other novelistic noir can get annoyingly baroque but the best just can't be beat." - Peter Thomson
"Did anyone mention Chad Taylor? Departure Lounge is sublime." - Te Ariki WiNeera
"The Broken Shore by Peter Temple. Brilliant!" - Anonymous
"Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca is a great classic crime novel, hard to beat for atmosphere, character and sense of place." - Pam, Wellington,
"Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express set in the 30's on the Istanbul- Paris Express is a great classic thriller." - Robin, Lower Hutt
Most listeners just couldn't narrow it down to just one book or one author, in part because favourite detectives straddle long series.
From Mary Hart: "I find it hard to decide which is my favourite crime novel. I love reading Americana and British crime novelists such as Michael Connelly (Harry Bosch series) and Ian Rankin (Rebus series). I also love the Scandinavian crime novels by authors such as Camilla Lackberg, Arnaldur Indridason, Asa Larsson, Jo Nesbo and Hanning Mankell. All have good characterisation and lots of interesting local colour. The ones that appeal to me most have a lead character with integrity and a passion for bringing the criminal to justice but does not always follow the book and has private demons to battle. Another series in this genre that comes to mind are the Inspector Ikman novels by Barbara Nadel which are set in Turkey.
"I am nearly at the end of Scottish Crime writer Ian Rankin's Rebus crime series. Set almost entirely in Edinburgh. Was there two weeks ago and visited a few of the actual places he writes about - notably The Oxford Bar. Wonderful. - Hamish.
"Ian Rankin every time. I love Inspector Rebus." Jenni
Norwegian author Jo Nesbo has a fan in Michelle Ingill: "Anything by Jo Nesbo. Great writer."
"Val McDermid is a great crime novel writer. Also Arnaldur Indriðason - Icelandic author. Good luck pronouncing that. :-)" - Barbara
"Patricia Highsmith, the Ripley novels and Iceland's Arnaldur Indriðason [are] unputdownable" -David
"Anything by Mo Hayder" - Garry
"Paul Cleave [2015 Ngaio Marsh Award nominee] is at the top of my list. Christchurch is one of his great characters. Always riveting." - Anonymous
"Fav crime novelist. Absolutely anything by Christchurch writer Paul Ceave [is] unputdownable." - Alice
"Big ups for the NZ novelist Edmund Bohan (the ex-opera singer) who wrote a cracking historical detective series [set] in late 1800s NZ. Starts with The Opawa Affair. Hard to find, but utterly worth it" - Lydia Gunn
"All C.J.Box stories keep me there until the end. I like the characters and the corporate corruption plots." - Janice
"The best crime writer I feel is French author Fred Vargas. She is an undersea & medieval specialist so her writing is always enthralling with these themes. You have to wait ages to get her books in our Auckland libraries. - Andy
"Barbara Nadel's novels. Just wonderful, either the Cetin Ikmen Series or the Francis Hancock ones." - Wendi Wicks
"Minette Walters has such psychological depth in her characters." - Anonymous
"No one has mentioned Jackson Brodie, Kate Atkinson's character. So I will. Yes, he's up there with other writers' crime solvers." - Diane Holmes, Pauanui
"Has anyone mentioned Cynthia Harrod-Eagles? She writes delightfully humorous novels featuring Detective Bill Slider. She presents a variety of well rounded characters and believable situations. Particularly engaging are her chapter headings which sometimes are laugh-out-loud plays on words. That there is a crime to solve just seems a bonus to a good story about people." - Anne Ferguson, New Plymouth
"My view of the genre was completely transformed when my friend Jeff introduced me to the Red Riding Quartet by David Peace, each novel is a year: 1974,1977,1980, and 1983 the final novel. The novels still haunt me [they] create a totally absorbing world - the characters are all pawns and victims of the terrible world that straddles the Yorkshire moors." - Matthew
"The historical crime series with Matthew Shardlake as the inquisitive solicitor on the edges of Henry VIII's court by C.J. Sansom is wonderful. Wish more had been written!!!" - Evelyn Skinner, Clyde
"Favourite crime writer is Tana French: Broken Harbour and The Likeness. Also Sophie Hannah from Little Face onwards. Her heroes are just as messed up as her villains." - Tony, Nelson
"Has anyone mentioned Terry Hayes' brilliant recent novel I Am Pilgrim. Spy,murder thriller par excellante! I am also a John Le Carre fan. A Smiley's People remake would be great." - Graeme, Whangarei
"Love anything by Liza Marklund." - Anonymous
"Raymond Chandler created the only detective I would want working for me in the crumbling granite of Phillip Marlow." - Mark Manson, Takaka.
"Ross MacDonald was a great crime writer from the 1950's in the vein of the hardboiled detective novels of Chandler and Hammett. Library of America recently re-published 4 of his novels in one beautiful volume. Sparse intelligent writing." - Kate
Robert B. Parker's Spencer series; in tradition of Raymond Chandler - Anonymous
"The Guido Brunetti novels by Donna Leon. Set in Venice. Wonderful!!" - Helen Holdem
"I don't think anyone has mentioned Reginald Hill and his Dalziel and Pascoe novels - he is my favorite crime writer. Good development of the characters as they age, and the stories are good too." - Beth
"Cop Town, Pretty Girls or anything else by Karen Slaughter" - Lynette Tuohey
"Jussi-Adler Olsen is the best Scandinavian - start with Mercy". Julie S.
"Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache series, and Dorothy L. Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey books." - Liz
"Ed McBain - he was good. Sort of explored social issues but had a sense of humour." - Dave
"Kathy Reichs (professor) is a fine 'been there done that' writer. The TV series Bones is based on her novels also [her] scientific background adds credibility." - John Elliot, Christchurch
"Ben Aaronovitch['s] Rivers of London crime series - Kevin and Kath
"I have been reading Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London series. Brings a whole new dimension to London policing." - Disletza, Palmerston North
'Margery Allingham's Traitor's Purse is my favourite ever mystery novel, written in 1940 during WWII in Britain and hidden in a biscuit tin during the bombings. It has everything: suspense, romance, planes -- and a valet who was a former crim." - Julie
"Robert Wilson's quartet set in Seville, protagonist Inspector Javier Falcon. Deep, complex stories, atmospheric evocative descriptions of Seville" - Anonymous
Some other stray related notes Sunday Morning received:
"It was only when I first read NZ crime that it occurred to me that things like that happen in here too. Until then I felt bad things happened somewhere else." - Anonymous
"Nicky Hager. Dirty politics. Best crime story!" - P.O.
Sunday Morning also recommends for those delving into the genre they check out The Listener's monthly Crime and Thrillers column written by Bernard Carpinter, and a fascinating series previously run on Radio New Zealand National produced by BBC Radio 4 called Foreign Bodies that looks at the Crime Fiction culture of individual countries and what it says about their cultures.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Craig Sisterson, crime writing, Dame Ngaio Marsh
Duration: 20'22"

09:10
Mediawatch for 9 August 2015
BODY:
Mediawatch asks John Campbell what he brings to RNZ; helping hands skew news from overseas; public pays for diplomatic TV dinners.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'31"

09:45
Bridget Tunnicliffe - Netball World Cup
BODY:
Radio NZ sports reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe reports from Sydney where the Silver Ferns are aiming to bring home the Netball World Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: netball, Silver Ferns, Neball World Cup 2015
Duration: 5'39"

09:50
Manu Caddie - Confident Kōrero
BODY:
Manu Caddie and his family in Ruatoria have come up with an idea to help others learn te reo. They are offering one-on-one tutorials via skype. Manu Caddie talks about how Confident Kōrero has taken off.
EXTENDED BODY:
Manu Caddie and his family in Ruatoria have come up with an idea to help others learn te reo. They are offering one-on-one tutorials via skype. Manu Caddie talks about how Confident Kōrero has taken off.
Topics: te ao Maori, language, education
Regions:
Tags: Confident Kōrero, te reo Maori
Duration: 8'28"

10:10
Tim Bevan - Everest
BODY:
Ahead of the release of the movie Everest, which details the ill-fated expedition led by Rob Hall in 1996, Wallace talks to New Zealand producer Tim Bevan about how he brought the story to the big screen. Queenstown born Tim is a major talent in the world of movie making - being one half of the very successful Working Title partnership, the production company that has brought us such classics as The Big Lebowski, United 93, Bridget Jones' Diary, Fargo, and My Beautiful Laundrette.
EXTENDED BODY:
Ahead of the release of the movie Everest, which details the ill-fated expedition led by Rob Hall in 1996, Wallace talks to New Zealand producer Tim Bevan about how he brought the story to the big screen. Queenstown born Tim is a major talent in the world of movie making – being one half of the very successful Working Title partnership, the production company that has brought us such classics as The Big Lebowski, United 93, Bridget Jones’ Diary, Fargo, and My Beautiful Laundrette.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: films, Tim Bevan, Working Title Films, Everest, Rob Hall
Duration: 19'25"

10:30
Michael Lynagh - Rugby Legend
BODY:
You don't have to be a rugby fan to appreciate the immense talents of Australia's Michael Lynagh. Seventy-two test caps and 911 points scored - he retired from international rugby in 1995 with a fearsome reputation. But a few years ago, Michael Lynagh suffered a catastrophic stroke - he talks to Wallace about his amazing recovery and his brilliant career.
Topics: sport, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Michael Lynagh, rugby, wallabies, stroke
Duration: 27'59"

11:10
Susan Guthrie & Jevan Goulter - Korerotia te Tiriti
BODY:
Jevan Goulter and Susan Guthrie have spent the last eight months talking to dozens of prominent New Zealanders about the Treaty of Waitangi and race relations in Aotearoa. This week they launched Talk Treaty - Korerotia te Tiriti - a web-based collection of videos featuring interviews with everyone from Tariana Turia to Don Brash.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jevan Goulter and Susan Guthrie have spent the last eight months talking to dozens of prominent New Zealanders about the Treaty of Waitangi and race relations in Aotearoa. This week they launched Talk Treaty – Korerotia te Tiriti – a web-based collection of videos featuring interviews with everyone from Tariana Turia to Don Brash.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Morgan Foundation, Susan Guthrie, Treaty of Waitangi, race relations
Duration: 22'57"

11:45
Gillian Armstrong - Hollywood Fashion
BODY:
Gillian Armstrong is one of Australia's finest film directors. Her work includes My Brilliant Career, Little Women and Oscar and Lucinda. She speaks to Wallace about her latest offering - a documentary that traces the story of Australian fashion designer, Orry Kelly - a little known name which had a huge impact on Hollywood.
EXTENDED BODY:

Gillian Armstrong is one of Australia’s finest film directors. Her work includes My Brilliant Career, Little Women and Oscar and Lucinda. She speaks to Wallace about her latest offering – a documentary that traces the story of Australian fashion designer, Orry Kelly – a little known name which had a huge impact on Hollywood.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, costume design, Gillian Armstrong, Orry Kelly, fashion, Hollywood
Duration: 16'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:08 Current affairs
This week – news from Chunuk Bair, Palmerston North and Tekapo; we also pick over the Bledisloe Cup match and discuss the pressure on Cook Islands Maori; plus – The Week in Parliament.
8:12 Insight Gay Rights Beyond Marriage
It's nearly two years since gay and lesbian couples gained the right to marry in New Zealand. Since then, more than 1,500 same-sex couples have tied the knot and the rate of civil unions has plummeted. Worldwide, more countries are now following suit, including the US and the UK. But how has the Marriage Amendment Bill changed the lives of gays and lesbians living in this country, and has it been the silver-bullet against homophobia that some thought it would be? This Insight explores how same-sex marriage has changed what it is to be gay in New Zealand, and asks where to now for the queer rights movement.
Produced by Philippa Tolley.
8:40 Craig Sisterson – Kiwi Crime Writing
The founder of the Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel, Craig Sisterson, reflects on this year’s crop of finalists and the state of Kiwi crime writing. Craig regularly reviews crime novels and interviews authors for his blog Kiwi Crime.
9:06 Mediawatch
Mediawatch looks at two significant stories overseas and asks if a financial helping hand can skew the news coverage; and we ask John Campbell if he can campaign for things like he did on TV now that he’s a Radio New Zealand man – and how he plans to tempt people from TV to a multimedia drive-time programme.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Bridget Tunnicliffe – Netball World Cup
Radio NZ sports reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe reports from Sydney where the Silver Ferns are aiming to bring home the Netball World Cup.
9.45 Manu Caddie – Confident Kōrero
Manu Caddie and his family in Ruatoria have come up with an idea to help others learn te reo. They are offering one-on-one tutorials via skype. Manu Caddie talks about how Confident Kōrero has taken off.
10:06 Tim Bevan – Everest
Ahead of the release of the movie Everest, which details the ill-fated expedition led by Rob Hall in 1996, Wallace talks to New Zealand producer Tim Bevan about how he brought the story to the big screen. Queenstown born Tim is a major talent in the world of movie making – being one half of the very successful Working Title partnership, the production company that has brought us such classics as The Big Lebowski, United 93, Bridget Jones’ Diary, Fargo, and My Beautiful Laundrette.
10:30 Michael Lynagh – Rugby Legend
You don’t have to be a rugby fan to appreciate the immense talents of Australia’s Michael Lynagh. Seventy-two test caps and 911 points scored – he retired from international rugby in 1995 with a fearsome reputation. But a few years ago, Michael Lynagh suffered a catastrophic stroke – he talks to Wallace about his amazing recovery and his brilliant career.
11:05 Susan Guthrie & Jevan Goulter – Korerotia te Tiriti
Jevan Goulter and Susan Guthrie have spent the last eight months talking to dozens of prominent New Zealanders about the Treaty of Waitangi and race relations in Aotearoa. This week they launched Talk Treaty – Korerotia te Tiriti – a web-based collection of videos featuring interviews with everyone from Tariana Turia to Don Brash.
11.45 Gillian Armstrong – Hollywood Fashion
Gillian Armstrong is one of Australia’s finest film directors. Her work includes My Brilliant Career, Little Women and Oscar and Lucinda. She speaks to Wallace about her latest offering – a documentary that traces the story of Australian fashion designer, Orry Kelly – a little known name which had a huge impact on Hollywood.

===12:11 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

=AUDIO=

12:10
Verse and Versatility
BODY:
Roger Lusby's skills define versatility:- mechanic, builder, craftsman, recording engineer, musician, balladeer, performance poet. Based on experience, he's written about fruit picking in Central Otago, the Mckenzie Country, Canterbury's infamous Nor'westerly winds, maintaining machinery in the Antarctic,- the list goes on. Spectrum's Jack Perkins chats with Roger about his colourful life with illustrations from his poetry.
EXTENDED BODY:

Sketch by courtesy of Ashley Smith.
I give lift to wings of hawk, I’ve rocked the laughing owl
Where kaka die and tara cry, I burn the tussocks brown...

– From The Great Nor’wester by Roger Lusby.
Roger Lusby’s parents ran an orchard in the Old Man Range near Roxburgh in Central Otago. Some of Roger’s earliest memories were of characters among the fruit pickers. But this was the late 40s early 50’s and one of the marvels of the age, the Roxburgh hydro dam, was under construction, attracting thousands of workers and colouring Roger’s experience of the region.

The Lusby orchard and homestead in the embrace of a Central Otago winter.
Roger migrated north sampling the McKenzie Country, droving, small town life and even Canterbury’s hot, dry Nor’westers.At an early age he discovered a flair for fixing things mechanical and this led to a year in Antarctica in 1969, responsible for machine maintenance at Scott Base. He was only 22 years old.

A transporter built by Roger in Antartica. Some of the machines the 22 year-old had to maintain.
Clean, sharp crack of frost
Blue white frozen snow
Minus fifty degrees below

– From Husky by Roger Lusby.

Repairing one of Sir Edmund Hillary's old tractors - where to begin? Roger after a year in Antarctica.

Nothing escapes Roger Lusby’s pen:-dogs, cattle, phone party lines, drought and even the Queen’s visit in 1995 - there's a story in them all.
Spectrum’s Jack Perkins chats with Roger about his colourful life with illustrations from his poetry.

Roger Lusby
Topics: farming, history, life and society, language, arts
Regions: Canterbury, Otago
Tags: Antarctica, poetry, bush poetry, ballads, Roxburgh, No 8 wire syndrome, Nor’wester wind, phone party line, droving, No 8 Wire
Duration: 26'40"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:37 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 3:04 The Drama Hour: highlighting radio playwriting and performance.

=AUDIO=

12:45
How to murder your wife
BODY:
Expat scriptwriter John Banas may have been based in Australia for years but he's still one of the go-to writers for TV drama programmes in New Zealand. He's written three of the four Platinum Fund films based on real life events, that are about to screen on TVNZ. The first one's a very black comedy called - How to murder your wife.
EXTENDED BODY:

Expat scriptwriter John Banas may have been based in Australia for years but he’s still one of the go-to writers for TV drama programmes in New Zealand. He’s written three of the four Platinum Fund films based on real life events, that are about to screen on TVNZ. The first one’s a very black comedy called - How to murder your wife.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: TVNZ, How To Murder Your Wife, John Banas
Duration: 16'19"

13:35
Special effects make-up
BODY:
Alexandra Guillot started out colouring prosthetics for filming in Sydney while training in special effects make-up. After a stint in Hong Kong, she now works at Weta Workshop and as a freelance designer. While make up was her starting point, she's interested in designing the entire look of a production, from set to costumes. Alexandra is currently designing an opera double bill for the New Zealand School of Music which opens on Thursday in Wellington.
EXTENDED BODY:

Alexandra Guillot started out colouring prosthetics for filming in Sydney while training in special effects make-up. After a stint in Hong Kong she now works at Weta Workshop and as a freelance designer. While make up was her starting point, she’s interested in designing the entire look of a production, from set to costumes.
Alexandra is currently designing an opera double bill for the New Zealand School of Music which opens on Thursday in Wellington.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Weta Workshop, make-up
Duration: 9'55"

13:48
Sean Kelly
BODY:
New York based fashion designer Sean Kelly, the first Kiwi to win the long-running Project Runway TV show, is about to reveal his latest collection for his home crowd. Sean's back home for a few months to work on the collection for New Zealand Fashion week. He's also keen to show what he's learnt from his time on Project Runway, in the year since the cameras stopped rolling. The young designer from Hawera is business savvy, capitalising on the publicity that came with the win.
EXTENDED BODY:

New York-based fashion designer Sean Kelly, the first Kiwi to win the long-running Project Runway TV show, is about to reveal his latest collection for his home crowd. Sean's back home for a few months to work on the collection for New Zealand Fashion week. He's also keen to show what he's learnt from his time on Project Runway, in the year since the cameras stopped rolling. The young designer from Hawera is business savvy, capitalising on the publicity that came with the win.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Project Runway, NZ Fashion Week
Duration: 13'39"

14:26
Spark international festival of art
BODY:
People involved in a vast range of creative endeavours, here and overseas, will be in Hamilton this week talking about what makes them tick. It's for Wintec's annual Spark international festival of art, media and design. We talk to two of the guest speakers. Invercargill-based Lindah Lepou's fashion designs incorporate Pacific and European textiles to reflect her Samoan, Scottish and English ancestry. Linda shows her work internationally while running a clothing factory. Johnson Witehira is an artist and designer working in print, typography, product, packaging and fashion design. He says he's aiming to "bring Maori visual culture back into the lives of Maori".
EXTENDED BODY:
People involved in a vast range of creative endeavours, here and overseas, will be in Hamilton this week talking about what makes them tick. It’s for Wintec’s annual Spark international festival of art, media and design. We talk to two of the guest speakers.
Invercargill-based Lindah Lepou's fashion designs incorporate Pacific and European textiles to reflect her Samoan, Scottish and English ancestry. Linda shows her work internationally while running a clothing factory.
Johnson Witehira is an artist and designer working in print, typography, product, packaging and fashion design. He says he's aiming to "bring Māori visual culture back into the lives of Māori".
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Spark Festival, Wintec, fashion, design
Duration: 11'13"

14:44
Cryptocosmos
BODY:
Artist Shannon Novak says there is music in everything. To prove it he has created sound and abstract images in response to the signage and architecture of Auckland's Te Uru Contemporary Gallery. But there's a catch; for the majority of the galleries visitors these works are silent - and invisible.
EXTENDED BODY:
Artist Shannon Novak makes music for buildings. And signs. And locations. And people.
He says there is music in everything and to prove it he has created sound and abstract images in response to the signage and architecture of Auckland’s Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery.
These compositions and images are attached to signs for the elevator, floor tiles, symbols for fire extinguishers and the like – ten everyday objects reframed as art and augmenting the reality we experience around us. But there’s a catch; for the majority of the galleries visitors these works are silent and invisible unless viewed using a digital device and a downloadable app. The exhibition is called Cryptocosmos and is hung - virtually - inside Te Uru and next door in Lopdell House and has begun to spread out into Titirangi village. These smaller works sprang from a much bigger plan.
“I wanted to create work over the Skytower. Logistically, it’s a nightmare. You could do things like projection but even that’s quite a considerable cost. So this technology – use of devices and augmented reality – is the answer.”

Andrew Clifford is the director of Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery and he commissioned the Cryptocosmos exhibition. He says Shannon is lucky to be alive at a time when digital technology makes merging art with objects a whole lot easier.
“Whereas once you had two quite different things now they’re both aspects of electronic media. You open up your laptop and you make sound and it shows you stuff and it all happens simultaneously. So the two have definitely been brought together.”
What separates Shannon from some other artists is the way his work originates. He only makes them after first experiencing them.
“People can call it synaesthesia. I look at an object and there’s a definite set of shapes I relate to that object and with those shapes a definite sound.”

Curiously, while most artworks develop during the process of being made, Shannon aims to be as faithful as he can to that initial experience - the exact shape, shade of colour and the musical sequence he originally imagined. And while the abstract images are often likened to the films of Len Lye or the paintings of Kandinsky or Mondrian, Shannon credits an early Philip Glass animation he saw as a child while watching Sesame Street.
“It was a really abstract animation where a whole lot of circles in different colours appeared and it was accompanied by voices. So there was that intersection between music, shape and colour.”
Contained within the title Cryptocosmos is the idea of an orderly, harmonious system and Shannon says he often places one work in an exhibition as a kind of sun around which others radiate. He’s begun to spread the works out into the Titirangi village and will continue to add works as he feels them and as he is able to.
While Shannon mostly exhibits and sells his works overseas he is hopeful of making more of a mark here in New Zealand. His work is mostly commissioned by galleries and while he acknowledges the difficulties of selling and owning virtual art works he imagines a future where people select a mixed augmented reality to belong to which contains any amount of images and information. In a sense Shannon Novak has secured the artists’ grail – an exhibition that continues to grow, will never be taken down and is unaffected by any works hung over it by other artists. Kandinsky, Mondrian, Glass and Lye would be proud – and possibly a little envious.
Shannon Novak's Cryptocosmos exhibition is on at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery in Titirangi, Auckland.

Topics: arts, music
Regions:
Tags: synaesthesia, Shannon Novak, Te Uru
Duration: 10'55"

14:54
Jim Wheeler
BODY:
Jim Wheeler's sculptures represent his two big passions... bronze casting and botany. He's lived in New Zealand since emigrating from the United States back in 1981. Jim learnt his trade as an apprentice working with master craftsmen. He loves this country's flora, casting sculptures of our native flowers through to lichen. Jim's also made a name for himself as a maker of medals. His exhibition Nature as Metaphor opens at Parnell's Artis Gallery on Tuesday and is represented at the New Zealand medal makers exhibition at the TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre in Auckland.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jim Wheeler's sculptures represent his two big passions... bronze casting and botany. He's lived in New Zealand since emigrating from the United States back in 1981. Jim learnt his trade as an apprentice working with master craftsmen. He loves this country's flora, casting sculptures of our native flowers through to lichen.
Jim's also made a name for himself as a maker of medals. His exhibition Nature as Metaphor opens at Parnell's Artis Gallery on Tuesday and is represented at the New Zealand medal makers exhibition at the TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre in Auckland.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: bronze, sculpture
Duration: 7'25"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:39 How to murder your wife
Expat scriptwriter John Banas may have been based in Australia for years but he’s still one of the go-to writers for TV drama programmes in New Zealand. He’s written three of the four Platinum Fund films based on real life events, that are about to screen on TVNZ. The first one’s a very black comedy called - How to murder your wife.

1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris
1:34 Special effects make-up
Alexandra Guillot started out colouring prosthetics for filming in Sydney while training in special effects make-up. After a stint in Hong Kong she now works at Weta Workshop and as a freelance designer. While make up was her starting point, she’s interested in designing the entire look of a production, from set to costumes. Alexandra is currently designing an opera double bill for the New Zealand School of Music which opens on Thursday in Wellington.

1:47 Sean Kelly
New York based fashion designer Sean Kelly, the first Kiwi to win the long-running Project Runway TV show, is about to reveal his latest collection for his home crowd. Sean's back home for a few months to work on the collection for New Zealand Fashion week. He's also keen to show what he's learnt from his time on Project Runway, in the year since the cameras stopped rolling. The young designer from Hawera is business savvy, capitalising on the publicity that came with the win.

2:05 The Laugh Track
Trumpet-player/singer Tim Stewart and saxophonist Nick Atkinson are a duo that couldn't be more Queen City. Hopetoun Brown is named after two central Auckland streets. Nick was Radio New Zealand's long-time music-show producer, while Tim writes about food and travel on his blog, and in the New Zealand Herald.

2:26 Spark international festival of art
People involved in a vast range of creative endeavours, here and overseas, will be in Hamilton this week talking about what makes them tick. It’s for Wintec’s annual Spark international festival of art, media and design. We talk to two of the guest speakers. Invercargill based Lindah Lepou's fashion designs incorporate Pacific and European textiles to reflect her Samoan, Scottish and English ancestry. Linda shows her work internationally while running a clothing factory. Johnson Witehira is an artist and designer working in print, typography, product, packaging and fashion design. He says he's aiming to "bring Māori visual culture back into the lives of Māori".
2:38 Abstract sound
Artist Shannon Novak says there is music in everything. To prove it he has created sound and abstract images in response to the signage and architecture of Auckland’s Te Uru Contemporary Gallery. But there’s a catch; for the majority of the galleries visitors these works are silent - and invisible.

2:49 Jim Wheeler
Jim Wheeler's sculptures represent his two big passions... bronze casting and botany. He's lived in New Zealand since emigrating from the United States back in 1981. Jim learnt his trade as an apprentice working with master craftsmen. He loves this country's flora, casting sculptures of our native flowers through to lichen. Jim's also made a name for himself as a maker of medals. His exhibition Nature as Metaphor opens at Parnell's Artis Gallery on Tuesday and is represented at the New Zealand medal makers exhibition at the TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre in Auckland.

3:05 The Drama Hour
The second part of Maurice Shadbolt's famous play, Once on Chunuk Bair.

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | Spiritual Outlook===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
Te Ahuru Mōwai - The impact of suicide on Māori communities
BODY:
Ko te piko o te māhuri, tera te tupu o te rākau. They way in which the young sapling is nurtured, determines how strong it will grow as a tree. This whakatāuki speaks to the theme of a National Suicide Prevention hui hosted by Te Runanga o Ngāti Pikiao, in Rotorua. Justine Murray presents coverage of the conference, and speaks to those directly affected by it, and gains an insight into what the solutions are to decrease the rising statistics of suicide amongst Māori.
EXTENDED BODY:
Rotorua-based Māori organisation, Te Runanga o Ngati Pikiao hosted Turamarama ki te Ora, a national suicide prevention hui that brought together a number of key people who work at the forefront of the Māori health sector, academia and indigenous research. The discussion kaupapa was understanding how suicide prevention begins from conception.
The three day conference included discussion from consultant and te reo advocate Moe Milne (Ngāti Hine, Nga Puhi); chief tikanga advisor and general manager at Waitemata and Auckland District Health Board, Naida Glavish (Ngāti Whatua); Māori rights activist and lawyer Moana Jackson (Ngāti Kahungunu); Meridian kinesiologist Maui Te Pou (Tūhoe); and a range of health workers from the mental, youth and social sector.
Justine Murray presents coverage from the conference.
Turamarama is about hope and it's about the potential of the child, how do we support the child to have protective factors around them such as their language, their own waiata, haka? That's what where we are hoping to achieve from the conference.
- Michael Naera

At one of the local pubs in downtown Taumarunui the bar was replaced with rowing machines and gym equipment after Jamie Downs turned it into a Wellness Centre. In recent years, Jamie suffered from depression and was suicidal after his sight deteriorated. The impairment brought on feelings of depression and as a result Jamie gained weight and at his heaviest, he tipped the scales at 174 kilos.
His whanau rallied around him, eventually he underwent two cornea transplants, and went on a mission to get well, both in mind and body.
Cue, the Breakthrough Wellness Centre.
Jamie shared his story on social media, called Jamie Downs – The Journey. He went on to lose 74 kilos, but it hasn’t been easy. In recent months as he has become busier, the kilos have crept back on, he says it’s a daily process. Jamie’s story has encouraged others, and he credits his Aunty Tariana Turia and Dr Keri Lawson-Te Aho for their ongoing support. He shared his story at the conference.
For me, its just about aroha. Showing the people that come through the doors that
everyone is an individual and everyone is dealing with something different, some might be drugs, some might be alcohol, for some it might be weight. When Whaea Tariana said, what are you doing? I said we are helping people go from addiction...because I was there.
- Jamie Downs

Consultant, researcher and te reo Māori advocate Moe Milne describes whakatauki (proverbs) as ‘jewels of wisdom’. Whakatauki contain only a few words, but contained is a profound message. Her own twist of the whakatauki 'Ko te piko o te māhuri, tera te tupu o te rakau' (The way in which you nurture the sapling, determines how it will grow), was adapted to take on a new meaning which she has used in her work in the Far North, she says, 'Manaakitia te Mahuri – He Tupuna kei roto', to mean look after the sapling, because therein lies your tupuna, your future.
Moe Milne has long been an advocate of the well-being of Māori. At the conference she drew on her personal experiences when one of her whanau went through feelings of suicide.
You know that picture of mai nga tupuna, heke mai ki a koe, mai i a koe ka puta ano te whakapapa, I actually thought we need to tell her what would happen to our whakapapa if she weren't in it. So we went around all our whanau, and there were a few of us, including the babies, to tell her what would happen to me if she weren't there. What would happen to my mokopuna if she wasn't there, what would happen to her brothers and sisters.
I didn't know if it was a good thing or bad thing or otherwise, but I wanted her to know that she was precious to us. That she belonged to this whanau, and this whanau will do anything it takes, as we all do, to make it a place for her to function in, to thrive in, to live in.
- Moe Milne

Warner Rahurahu lost his brother to suicide, what he learned from the experience is that Māori have to be brave and talk to someone. In reflection he says there were warning signs, and part of the issue for his brother was not dealing with his past. Today, Warner helps a lot of people, especially young people who want to take up Waka Ama. He likens the wellbeing of the hinengaro (mind) and wairua (spirit) to the functionality of a waka.
We don't have that outlet, we look to our mates and we have to be tough, we look to our fathers we have to be tough and the reality is is that we don't have that avenue. This kaupapa is awesome because it is about being able to talk with each other. Being able to express what is going on. It doesn't mean we are weak.
- Warner Rahurahu

Mehemea kei te noho koe i te pouritanga, tēnā whātoro atu ki tou whanau, ki ou hoa piripono rānei. Atu i tērā, anei ētahi o nga roopu awhina. (If you are experiencing depression, reach out to whanau or close friends. Here are a number of ways to get help).

The Lowdown
Depression.org.nz
Like Minds

Nga Waiata/Featured Music

Absent performed by Hana,
Cries of an Unhappy Child performed by Nicole
Album: Songs from the Inside
Kua Tata and Hinekoti
Whirimako Black
Album: Shrouded in the Mist/Hinepukohurangi
Reconnect
Maisey Rika
Album: Maisey Rika
Topics: te ao Maori, health
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: Michael Naera, suicide prevention, suicide, tikanga
Duration: 53'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | One In Five===
=DESCRIPTION=

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:06
Help them Blossom - Unlocking Potential in Autistic Children
BODY:
Emma Goodall is on a crusade to change the world one teacher at a time. She is an education consultant and university lecturer with a special interest in autism. Emma is on the spectrum herself and has just written a book with simple tips for teaching children with autism.
EXTENDED BODY:
Emma Goodall is on a crusade to change the world one teacher at a time. She is an education consultant and university lecturer with a special interest in autism. Emma is on the spectrum herself and has just written a book with simple tips for teaching children with autism.
She says the most important things a teacher can do for a child is to like and value them and strive to understand them. “My driving force is if I can achieve why can’t other people on the spectrum achieve? Everyone has the right to a happy life and I think everybody on the spectrum could have that if they were understood and their support was appropriate.”
Image: Emma Goodall with Altogether Autism Manager, Catherine Trezona
Emma’s book includes a sensory screen, an information-gathering tool that can help teachers identify triggers for children on the autism spectrum that make them feel very uncomfortable and could be a barrier to them engaging in learning.
Emma was one of the speakers at the recent Altogether Autism conference in Auckland which brought together people with lived experience of autism, parents and professionals to discuss best practice and research and to share their stories.
One in Five talks to Emma Goodall and two of the other presenters at the autism conference, Sue Kinnear and Erika Ford.
Topics: life and society, education
Regions:
Tags: autism, disability, Asperger’s, Sensory Rooms, Altogether Autism
Duration: 25'44"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:35 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)

===7:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical Hour One - 9 August 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to lear about the colourful, dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 53'49"

21:05
Sounds Historical Hour Two - 9 August 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to learn about the colourful, dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:08 Today in New Zealand History 5’33”
Visit from the American fleet, 9 August 1908.
8:14 Remembering Cilla Black 2’56”
Entertainer Cilla Black died during the week at the age of 72. She visited New Zealand several times and in 1971 took part in a programme at Station 1ZH Hamilton during which listeners could phone in.
8:18 Artist: Cilla Black 2’48”
Song: Anyone Who had a Heart
Composer: Bacharach
Album:
Label:
8:23 A Portrait of a Prime Minister 12’41”
A 'Guest of Honour’ interview in 1974 in which Hamish Keith talks to Labour Prime Minister Bill Rowling a few months after he had taken up the new role following the death of Prime Minister Norman Kirk. Part 1
8:36 Artist: Shirley Rhodes with the Julian Lee Quartet 2’47”
Song: Eternally
Composer: Charlie Chaplin (1952)
Album: A Night on the Town
Label: Stebbing Zodiac
8:40 The Sounds Doctor 9’35”
A 1973 Spectrum in which Jack Perkins joins Dr Victor Jacobsen on his rounds and talks with him about the unique launch medical service he provides for the Marlborough Sounds. Part two.
8:50 Artist: Kevin Blackatini (Kevin Black) 3’30”
Song: The Fridge
Composer: Tait
Album: The Fridge
Label:
DJ Kevin Black’s Top 20 hit with this spoof of Deane Waretini’s 1981 chart topper ‘The Bridge’. Black died in February 2013 at age of 69.
8:53 War Report 48 6’25”
Recollections of the fighting at Chunuk Bair from Corporal Cyril Bassett of Auckland, a signaller, who was the first New Zealander to win a Victoria Cross in this war, “I come across three breaks. I mended two of them that were pretty close together. I followed the wire on a bit further and mended that. I don't mind telling you that I was pretty windy while I was doing it, with the stuff that was coming across, but luckily there wasn't much shrapnel."
Another survivor describes helping a wounded man.
Music:
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There’s a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
Artist: Peter Dawson
Song: Boys of the Old Brigade (McGuigan)
Composer: McGuigan
Album: Oh, It's A Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD 41 486309
9:04 As I Remember 4’10”
The Wonderful Contraption by Mrs C McGlone of Waipukurau, read by Rebecca Blundell.
9:10 Results of July homework
1. Which town has an international airport but never had a railway? Queenstown
2. Which sport was introduced to Australia by a New Zealand team? Rugby League
Winners: Margaret Fidow of Auckland, Gary Murdoch of i Wellington
Prizes: Unpacking The Kists – The Scots in New Zealand by Tom Brooking, Jim McAloon and Brad Patterson. Otago University Press
Blackberry Pie – New Zealand Ballads by Joe Charles Wily Publications
9:12 A Piano for All Seasons 15’01”
In this 1976 Spectrum programme Margaret Fahey talks about her life as a cinema and theatre pianist in Timaru in the 1930s. Part 2
9:28 Les Munro – the Last Dambuster 12’52”
During the week Les Munro of Tauranga, the last of the men to fly on the Dambusters raid in 1943 died at the age of 96. He describes his part in the operation during which he had to turn back before reaching the target.
Song: Dambusters March 3’51”
Artist: The English Chamber Orchestra
Composer: Coates
Album: AJA 5069
Label: ASW

9:41 Fairlie at 150 18’15”
Next year Fairlie in the Mackenzie Country celebrates 150 years. Jim Sullivan visits the local museum and talks to Helen and John Beattie about the historical resources held and how they will be used to mark the anniversary. Rosemary Moran describes the oral history project being planned.

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

John Diliberto hosts this documentary on the 30-year history of Windham Hill Records.

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274417

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 09 Aug 2015