Radio New Zealand National. 2015-06-21. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

21 June 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday 3:05 Bread and Roses, by Sonja Davies (13 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Lost and Found in Auckland, written and told by Willie Davis; The Man who Walked on Water, by David Somerset, told by Fiona Samuel; Solstice Celebration, by Kaye Vaughan, told by Vanessa Rhodes; Northwood, by Brian Falkner, told by Fiona Samuel; Anything Cake, by Heather Browning, told by Carmel McGlone; House of Coloured Windows, by Margaret Mahy, told by Heather Bolton (RNZ)

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, music and including: 7:43 The Week in Parliament: An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ) 8:10 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ) 9:06 Mediawatch: Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:09
Fiji's leader leads the charge for a new flag
BODY:
New Zealand is not the only Pacific nation grappling with a suitable ensign and that which best represents its national identity. While critics say there are more pressing issues for the island state, Fiji's leader is also drawing attention to the flag debate.
Topics: Pacific, politics
Regions:
Tags: Fiji, flag, Frank Bainimarama
Duration: 6'50"

07:17
Concerns over quality of housing and its impact on health
BODY:
Philippa Howden Chapman is a professor of public health at the University of Otago and is currently the chair of the WHO Housing and Health Guideline Development group.
Topics: housing, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'44"

07:27
Gisborne teen makes spinning tops for children in Vanuatu
BODY:
14-year-old Cameron Wood from Gisborne has been spending hours in his family's garden shed making spinning tops for children from cyclone devastated Vanuatu.
Topics:
Regions: East Coast
Tags: Gisborne, Vanuatu
Duration: 2'46"

07:30
The Week In Parliament for 21 June 2015
BODY:
Questions on Housing dominate the week; Wednesday sees a short debate on Southern DHB fiasco; Estimates reviews continue; Committees conduct budget reviews of Ombudsman, Office of the Clerk & Police; Foreign Affairs Committee hears Petitions on Syrian Christian refugees & TPP trade deal; Busy week for Government Minister Michael Woodhouse; Su'a William Sio pays tribute to Jerry Collins.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'18"

07:45
Bishop Drennan discusses Pope's letter on the environment
BODY:
Catholic Bishop of Palmerston North, Charles Drennan, on the Supreme Pontiff's environmental encyclical.
Topics: spiritual practices, environment
Regions:
Tags: Catholicism
Duration: 7'21"

07:55
Whanganui floods
BODY:
Whanganui District Civil Defence and Emergency Management Controller Kevin Ross on the area's worst floods on record.
Topics:
Regions: Hawkes Bay, Whanganui
Tags: Whanganui floods
Duration: 4'04"

08:12
Insight for 21 June 2015 - Child Abuse or Big Brother ?
BODY:
Teresa Cowie explores profiling for potential child harm
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand is leading the world with ground breaking research that uses government-held data to try and stop child abuse before it happens.
But an Insight investigation has found this form of profiling is also raising questions about some of the things people hold most dear: their children and their privacy and of unintended consequences.
We consider the key questions below.
Listen to Insight: Child Abuse or Big Brother?
In 2012, as part of its crusade against child abuse and following recommendations from the White Paper for Vulnerable Children, the National government commissioned Auckland University to undertake groundbreaking research to try to find out if information it holds about citizens could be used to predict whether a children might be abused or neglected.
The initial research, done by Professor Rhema Vaithianathan, is being closely followed by international researchers. The idea of profiling, or Predictive Risk Modelling, is not new. But basing the model on information held by the government in order to predict child maltreatment is.
The latest research suggests it is fairly accurate. Of the top 1 percent of children it predicted to be at high risk, 42.2 percent were found to have have been maltreated by the age of 5.
But opponents say that's not accurate enough and families will be harmed if they are identified incorrectly.
Patrick Kelly is a paediatrician and the clinical director of Auckland Hospital's child abuse unit. He is involved with police on a daily basis trying to make collaborative decisions about what risk a child might be in.
I am well aware of the deficiencies in risk assessment and I think that if you are going to introduce a tool like this based on population data into front line practice there's a real, serious risk of unintended consequences."

The likelihood of beneficiaries being singled out is a worry for advocate, Kay Brereton, who believes such profiling would stigmatise beneficiaries as child abusers.
She said there is more data held on beneficiaries because they use more social services and that means they are more likely to be picked up by the system.
The Head of Philosophy at Auckland University, Tim Dare, did an ethics review of the research and he said it could stigmatise Māori too, but he thinks the stigma could be minimised if it's handled properly.
THE KEY QUESTIONS
How would the profiling work?
There isn't a set system yet because it is still being decided if or how it would be used. But in the latest research the Ministry of Social Development used 13 indicators or pieces of information about a child's family to work out what it calls a 'risk score' of 1 to10. Those with a score of 1 were at less risk of abuse, those with a score of 10 were more likely to be harmed.
What government information would it use?
So far the researchers have used benefit data, from all the forms and information people hand over when they get support or services from Work and Income. They also look at Department of Corrections data to see if you've been in prison, medical records and Child, Youth and Family files to see if any of the parents of other children have been in care, or if the parents themselves have been in care, as well as Births, Deaths and Marriages information.
What information about me that the government holds could 'red-flag' me as a potential child abuser?
Here's the full list of indicators from the Ministry of Social Development's most recently published research:
Predictor Variables (Source: Ministry of Social Development)

Variable
Variable values

Gender of child
1=male
2=female

Low birth weight or pre-term
1=yes
2=no/unknown

Parenting demands
1=high parenting demands1,
2=no other children
3=other children but not high demands

Other children with care and protection history
1= yes
2= no

Police family violence notifications/contacts
1=events in one of the last 12 months
2=events in more than one of the last 12 months
3=no events

Caregiver's age
1=under 20 years
2=aged 20-24 years
3=aged 25-29 years
4=aged 30-34 years
5=aged 35-39 years
6=aged 40 or above

Benefit caregiver is not a birth registration parent
1=yes
2=no birth registration
3=no

Single parent
1=single parent
2=single parent and no father listed on birth registration
3=not a single parent or partnership status unknown

Time on benefit in the last 5 years
1=more than 80%
2=between 20% and 80%
3=up to 20%
4=no time

Caregiver with care and protection history
1=yes
2=no

Benefit address changes in the last year
1=no address changes
2=1 or 2 address changes
3=3 or more address changes
4=missing

Mental health in the last 5 years2
1=substance abuse issues
2=persistent substance abuse issues
3=mental health issues other than substance abuse
4=persistent mental health issues other than substance abuse
5=no known mental health or substance abuse issues

Behavioural or relationship difficulties as a child3
1=yes
2=no

Corrections history in the last 5 years
1=non-custodial sentence
2=custodial sentence for non-violent crimes
3=custodial sentence for violent crimes
4=no history

Child, Youth and Family site
43 Child, Youth and Family sites

Notes:
1 - The child is a multiple birth child, there are three or more other children in the family, or one or more other child aged under 3 years in the family.
2 - Based on incapacity codes recorded for caregivers who had received incapacity-related benefits.
3 - Based on substantiated findings recorded for the parent or caregiver in Child Youth and Family data.
Could the government use it to take my children off me, before I've even done anything?
No, the Ministry of Social Development says it would only be used to help families with a high risk score by giving extra help and social services. It says it would be completely up to the family to decide if they want to get involved and take that extra help.
What sort of help would a family be given?
The Ministry is still trying to figure out how social workers might use it to help high risk families. It is running some trials at the moment and will be reporting back the results at the end of the year.
Would the score replace a social workers judgment of how a family is doing?
The Ministry says no, it wouldn't. It says social workers look at the whole picture and the profiling model is only limited to the data that is held. Also, people's family situations are changing all the time and social workers can get the best and most up to date understanding of any potential risks.
Research on profiling for child abuse from The Ministry of Social Development's website
Follow Insight on Twitter

Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: child abuse, profiling, data collection, privacy, stigma
Duration: 26'29"

08:40
Brando Yelavich - coastal expert
BODY:
Brando Yelavich on his successful 6-month, which turned into 2-year, coastal quest to circumnavigate Aotearoa.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Brando Yelavich, New Zealand Coastline
Duration: 16'47"

09:06
Mediawatch for 21 June 2015
BODY:
The return of a Māori TV scoop; military mistakes exposed on TV3; digital transition gathers speed at our big media companies; local cartoons cut from local papers, and; stories about diets high in fat - but low on facts.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 32'16"

09:40
Toby Morris - Privilege Goes Viral
BODY:
Last month Auckland cartoonist Toby Morris penned a comic exploring the issue of privilege - it has been read by more than 1.5 million people around the world and there's talk about turning it into a short film. The comic, On a Plate, was part 10 of his Pencilsword series published on Radio New Zealand's youth-orientated website The Wireless.
EXTENDED BODY:
Last month Auckland cartoonist Toby Morris penned a comic exploring the issue of privilege – it has been read by more than 1.5 million people around the world and there’s talk about turning it into a short film. The comic, On a plate, was part 10 of his Pencilsword series published on Radio New Zealand’s youth-orientated website The Wireless.
Picture: Toby Morris
Topics: arts, inequality
Regions:
Tags: Toby Morris, cartoons, Pencilsword
Duration: 12'17"

10:10
Snooping on Jurors
BODY:
Jury Selection Services is a new company offering to trawl the social media profiles of jurors, and carry out surveillance on their homes. The company says it wants to help eliminate biased jurors but some academics and lawyers say the idea is alarming.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: jury selection, justice
Duration: 27'47"

10:35
Jacob Tomuri - Stunt Man
BODY:
The recent success at the box office of 'Mad Max: Fury Road' has not just been good for the career of actor Tom Hardy - but also for the career of his New Zealand born stunt double Jacob Tomuri. Jacob joins Wallace to talk about life on set and just what it's like to be the doppelganger of one of the world's hottest actors.
EXTENDED BODY:

Tom Hardy (left) and stunt double, Jacob Torumi (right).
The recent success at the box office of Mad Max: Fury Road has not just been good for the career of actor Tom Hardy – but also for the career of his New Zealand-born stunt double Jacob Torumi.
Jacob joins Wallace to talk about life on set and just what it’s like to be the doppelganger of one of the world’s hottest actors.
Related stories

Simon Morris reviews Mad Max: Fury Road
Film Reviewer Dan Slevin on Mad Max: Fury Road, Pitch Perfect 2 and Slow West
Mad Max museum - An enduring craze for the iconic films has moved a family from Bradford, Yorkshire to the Aussie outback.

Topics:
Regions:
Tags: film, Mad Max: Fury Road, stunt double, doppelganger
Duration: 17'17"

10:55
Strange Day's Night
BODY:
The Play it Strange project held the Strange Day's Night concert in Auckland where youngsters took to the stage to put their own spin on some old Rolling Stones numbers.
Topics: music
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Play It Strange, Auckland
Duration: 5'04"

11:10
Ahi Karunaharan - The Mourning After
BODY:
Wallace speaks with playwright Ahi Karunaharan about his play The Mourning After - a moving tale about love, loss and life reclaimed in Sri Lanka after the devastating Boxing Day tsunami of 2004.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre, Boxing Day tsunami, Sri Lanka
Duration: 12'26"

11:30
Brin Jonathan Butler - Boxing and Castro
BODY:
Brin Jonathan Butler is a journalist and former amateur boxer. His memoir The Domino Diaries has just been released which chronicles his time in Cuba following some of the world's greatest boxers - and he's got plenty to say about former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson too.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Cuba, Mike Tyson, boxing
Duration: 29'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:08 Current affairs
In this hour: A new flag – for Fiji; update on housing; a 14-year-old from Gisborne has been spending hours in his family's garden shed making spinning tops for children in cyclone devastated Vanuatu; the Catholic Bishop of Palmerston North, Charles Drennan, on the Pope’s call for urgent action to save the planet; and The Week in Parliament. Right: Fiji's current flag
[image:40919:full]
8:12 Insight
Every year Child Youth and Family takes about 150,000 calls from people worried about a child – just over 20,000 turn out to be proven cases of abuse or neglect. But imagine if we could do away with the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff and predict who might hurt their children before it's even happened. Government-commissioned research into using personal data to forecast possible abuse has proven to be fairly accurate. Teresa Cowie asks where should the line be drawn between protecting children and keeping private, personal information?
Produced by Philippa Tolley.
8:40 Brando Yelavich – Around the Coast
Twenty-one-year-old Brando Yelavich has seen more of New Zealand than most people twice his age. When he was just a teenager – a fast-going-off-the-rails teenager – he decided to walk around the entire NZ coastline. It was supposed to take six months but it took more than two years, and was the first time it had ever been done. Brando speaks to Wallace about his amazing adventure and what he learned on the way.
9:06 Mediawatch
Mediawatch looks at two hard-hitting TV investigations, and local cartoons in local newspapers. Also: The media’s digital transformation is gathering steam, and stories about food high in fat which were low on facts.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Toby Morris – Privilege Goes Viral
Last month Auckland cartoonist Toby Morris penned a comic exploring the issue of privilege – it has been read by more than 1.5 million people around the world and there’s talk about turning it into a short film. The comic, On a plate, was part 10 of his Pencilsword series published on Radio New Zealand’s youth-orientated website The Wireless.
Picture: Toby Morris
10:06 Snooping on Jurors
Jury Selection Services is a new company offering to trawl the social media profiles of jurors and carry out surveillance on their homes. The company says it wants to help eliminate biased jurors but some academics and lawyers say the idea is alarming.
10:40 Jacob Torumi – Stunt Man
The recent success at the box office of Mad Max: Fury Road has not just been good for the career of actor Tom Hardy – but also for the career of his New Zealand-born stunt double Jacob Torumi. Jacob joins Wallace to talk about life on set and just what it’s like to be the doppelganger of one of the world’s hottest actors.

Tom Hardy (left) and stunt double, Jacob Torumi (right)
11:05 Ahi Karunaharan – The Mourning After
Wallace speaks to playwright Ahi Karunaharan about his play The Mourning After – a moving tale about love, loss and reclaiming life in Sri Lanka after the devastating Boxing Day tsunami of 2004.
The Mourning After is on at The Basement Theatre in Auckland from June 30 – July 3.

11:30 Brin Jonathan Butler – Boxing and Castro
Brin Jonathan Butler is a journalist and former amateur boxer. His memoir The Domino Diaries has just been released and it chronicles his time in Cuba following some of the world’s greatest boxers – and he’s got plenty to say about former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson too. Brin’s story is fascinating, particularly when it comes to the story of Cuban boxer Guillermo Rodingeaux. He speaks to Wallace about boxing, Castro and the art of dance.
PLAYLIST:
Miss Li - My Heart Goes Boom
Depeche Mode - Enjoy the Silence
Prince - Purple Rain

=PLAYLIST=

Miss Li - My Heart Goes Boom
Depeche Mode - Enjoy the Silence
Prince -Purple Rain

===12:12 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

Josie Lancaster has converted the basement of her Porirua home into a Koha Shed where people bring all manner of goods - clothes, toys, books, furniture, the list is long - to help those in need in the community. Spectrum's Jack Perkins finds out how it all works and talks to the givers and receivers of koha (Māori for gift) (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:05
The Koha Shed
BODY:
Josie Lancaster has converted the basement of her Porirua home into a Koha Shed where people bring all manner of goods - clothes, toys, books, furniture, the list is long - to help those in need in the community. Spectrum's Jack Perkins finds out how it all works and talks to the givers and receivers of koha (Māori for gift).
EXTENDED BODY:

Josie Lancaster with daughter and main helper Donna Mikaere. Josie dubs Donna the Koha Shed's mascot.
I just love helping people and that’s why I set up the Koha Shed.

– Josie Lancaster
A Koha Shed is a kind of op shop where everything is free and no money is involved. Of course, the Koha Sheds have sprung up out of severe need in these hard times. Koha Sheds have generated good will and trust in the community – those receiving also give when they can, so the system is not exploited.

The Koha Shed's always overflowing storage area.
Josie’s Koha Shed in Ascot Park is one of a growing network in the Porirua region. People bring all manner of goods to the shed – clothes, toys, books, furniture, the list is long – to help those in need in the community.

People meet and chat as well give and receive.
Of course, the shed is a boon for beneficiaries and the low-paid. But people show up in Josie’s basement for all kinds of reasons. A teenage girl sifts through the clothes hangers, she’s had her luggage stolen while bussing down from Hamilton and has no money to buy new clothes.

This teenager had her luggage stolen and is looking for things to ward off the winter chills.
Spectrum’s Jack Perkins finds out how it all works and talks with the givers and receivers of koha (Māori for gift).

She's grateful for this boxful of pre-loved clothes to replace her stolen wardrobe.
Topics: life and society, te ao Māori
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: poverty, koha, giving, Porirua, community
Duration: 23'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:40 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 3:04 The Drama Hour: Undercover Mumbai, by Ayeesha Menon (Omnibus) A police thriller following a young woman inspector in the Mumbai Police Force as she attempts to solve a series of crimes, make sense of her troubled past and cope with being a woman in a male-dominated and chauvinistic police force (F, Goldhawk)

=AUDIO=

12:39
Lucien Rizos
BODY:
When Lucien Rizos isn't rehearsing or playing with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra he's wielding a telephoto lens. He's been taking photographs on the country's streets for several decades… now he's zooming in on people in their cars at traffic lights. His exhibition Unposed Portraits is on at the Anna Miles Gallery.
Topics: arts, music
Regions:
Tags: photography, Lucien Rizos, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
Duration: 8'13"

12:47
Arts Attitudes
BODY:
Creative New Zealand's released the results of its three-yearly survey into New Zealanders' attitudes, attendance and participation in the arts in 2014. Nine out of ten Kiwis have either attended or participated in at least one arts event in the past 12 months - the highest level of engagement since the surveys began in 2005. But in Christchurch, despite a lot of lobbying and a lot of art being produced, fewer people there now believe art has a vital role in the city's post-earthquake rebuild. CEO Stephen Wainwright explains how the questions were framed, because that plays a big part in how people answer, and what he hopes will come of the survey.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'31"

12:47
Arts attitudes
BODY:
Creative New Zealand's released the results of its three-yearly survey into New Zealanders' attitudes, attendance and participation in the arts in 2014. Nine out of ten Kiwis have either attended or participated in at least one arts event in the past 12 months - the highest level of engagement since the surveys began in 2005. But in Christchurch, despite a lot of lobbying and a lot of art being produced, fewer people there now believe art has a vital role in the city's post-earthquake rebuild. CEO Stephen Wainwright explains how the questions were framed, because that plays a big part in how people answer, and what he hopes will come of the survey.
EXTENDED BODY:

Creative New Zealand's released the results of its three-yearly survey into New Zealanders' attitudes, attendance and participation in the arts in 2014. Nine out of ten Kiwis have either attended or participated in at least one arts event in the past 12 months - the highest level of engagement since the surveys began in 2005.
But in Christchurch, despite a lot of lobbying and a lot of art being produced, fewer people there now believe art has a vital role in the city's post-earthquake rebuild.
CEO Stephen Wainwright explains how the questions were framed, because that plays a big part in how people answer, and what he hopes will come of the survey.
Topics: arts, life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'31"

13:30
Micro Madness
BODY:
National Flash Fiction Day is a celebration of extremely short fiction (works consisting of 1000 words or less), and this year micro fiction - works consisting of a word count of 100 words or less, puts writers through their paces in a category called ‘Micro Madness,’ run by writers Eileen Merrimen and Nod Ghosh.
EXTENDED BODY:

Eileen Merriman and Nod Ghosh
National Flash Fiction Day is a celebration of extremely short fiction (works consisting of 1000 words or less), and this year micro fiction—works consisting of a word count of 100 words or less, puts writers through their paces in a category called ‘Micro Madness,’ run by writers Eileen Merrimen and Nod Ghosh.
Shoulder tapped by the founder of National Flash Fiction Day Michelle Elvy, the two women say that the micro series has given writers the opportunity to put their skills to the test and produce some extraordinary work.
Ghosh says they had a list of criteria for which to judge the 145 submissions from around the country. The chosen pieces would then be published on the NFF website, with a new one featured each day.
Both women agree that there were pieces that grabbed them straight away, as well as a number of writers who submitted more than one piece of writing, but who could only be featured on the website once.
“We set about designing a scoring system at first [for instance ; how attention grabbing it was, originality of the story and characterisation, consistency of point of view, imagery…There were some mighty fine writers,” says Ghosh and she cites that the best pieces of work immediately created an atmosphere and mood.
“ If it’s done well it can be extremely beautiful,” says Merriman, a Doctor by day and avid writer by night. Like Nod, she completed a writing course many years ago. Both writers have been published and believe that it is the distilled essence of the writing that can makes a piece worthy of publication.
U.S born, now Wellington-based Sally Houtman has been published numerous times in NZ journal “Flash Frontier” and has a natural ability to bring her reader directly into a time and place, of which she says: “the descriptions end up telling the story.”
Her story ‘At Barrett Reef’ was inspired by the Wahine disaster and the idea of what it means to return to a place of tragedy. In the story she quickly establishes two characters and their relationship to one another and the mood that belies their connection is as dark as the disaster itself.
She adds that when dealing with a real event or history that one has to be very careful and respectful, so as not to become trite or glib. She has a strong connection to her internal, emotional world which shows in her work. A point of difference for her as a writer that as someone who is also legally blind, she claims she makes full use of her imagination to bring these characters and their worlds to life. “I don’t want to write what’s too easy. I don’t want to write what everybody else writes, I don’t want to write what everybody else sees. I want you to know what I experience, or what the character I created experiences.”
Having worked in addiction services for 21 years in the United States, Houtman has come to writing late in her life. But asked whether she draws some of her ability and emotional intensity from that experience, she says: “It was always in me, [that] ability to piece together those voices and snippets of what people are saying, and trying to make meaning out it.”
More information can be found on the National Flash Fiction day website.
Micro Fiction featured in the audio story:
At Barrett Reef by Sally Houtman, read by Sonia Sly and Maggie Hedge
Rose-Tinted World on Winter-Licked Sheets by Patrick Pink, read by Adrian McKenzie
Blind Tasting, by Heather McQuillan, read by Helena Nimmo
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: literature, writing
Duration: 14'25"

13:48
Séraphine Pick
BODY:
Séraphine Pick has been painting for more than 20 years and she has a distinctive, lyrical style. Now she's doing something that could be seen as dangerous... going in a new direction. Her works often meditate on dreams, memory and psychology. For her new exhibition called White Noise, she's painted images she's found trawling the internet and set them in dreamlike landscapes. White Noise opens at The Dowse gallery this Saturday.
EXTENDED BODY:
Séraphine Pick has been painting for more than 20 years and she has a distinctive, lyrical style... now she's doing something that could be seen as dangerous... going in a new direction. Her works often meditate on dreams, memory and psychology.
For her new exhibition called White Noise, she's painted images she's found trawling the internet and set them in dreamlike landscapes.
White Noise by Séraphine Pick opens at The Dowse gallery Saturday 27 June 2015.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Séraphine Pick, painting
Duration: 9'10"

14:26
Evan Roth
BODY:
Evan Roth is an artist and researcher and also defines himself as a hacker. He's based in Paris and is heading our way to take part in the Semi-Permanent Design conference in Auckland in a couple of weeks. He's collaborated with Jay-Z on the first open source rap video. He's the co-founder of the Graffiti Research and Free Art & Technology Labs which web-based, open source research and development laboratories. Evan also teaches urban hacking, a course a New York City councilman has declared "an invitation to break the law".
EXTENDED BODY:
Evan Roth is an artist and researcher and also defines himself as a hacker. He's based in Paris and is heading our way to take part in the Semi-Permanent Design conference in Auckland in a couple of weeks.
He's collaborated with Jay-Z on the first open source rap video. He's the co-founder of the Graffiti Research and Free Art & Technology Labs which web-based, open source research and development laboratories.
Evan also teaches urban hacking, a course a New York City councilman has declared "an invitation to break the law".

Topics: arts, technology, internet
Regions:
Tags: Evan Roth, Semi-Permanent Design conference, urban hacking
Duration: 11'08"

14:38
The Invisible Mile
BODY:
Competitive team cycling and warfare are inextricably linked in David Coventry's debut novel, The Invisible Mile, set during the 1928 Tour de France. This was the first time an English-speaking team had taken part in the gruelling competition, and it was made up of New Zealanders and Australians.There were no lightweight super-fast bikes back then. They competed on heavy fixed-wheel bikes with temperamental brakes and no lights. David has imagined what it would have been like being part of that team, but the story goes beyond the pain of his narrator during the long and arduous trip. David Coventry's novel The Invisible Mile is published by Victoria University Press.
EXTENDED BODY:

Competitive team cycling and warfare are inextricably linked in David Coventry's debut novel, The Invisible Mile, set during the 1928 Tour de France.
This was the first time an English-speaking team had taken part in the gruelling competition, and it was made up of New Zealanders and Australians.There were no lightweight super-fast bikes back then. They competed on heavy fixed-wheel bikes with temperamental brakes and no lights.
David has imagined what it would have been like being part of that team, but the story goes beyond the pain of his narrator during the long and arduous trip.
The Invisible Mile is published by Victoria University Press.
Topics: author interview, sport, books, arts
Regions:
Tags: Tour de France, The Invisible Mile, literature, David Coventry
Duration: 10'16"

14:49
The Year of Falling
BODY:
Wellington writer Janis Freegard gives her protagonist Selina a great life - she's dating a hot celebrity chef and her career as a graphic designer is going well. Then she has a spectacular fall from grace, despite the best efforts of her supportive big sister Smith. And what's with the mysterious china dolls that keep arriving on Selina's doorstep? The Year of Falling is published by Makaro Press, while Janis' new Poetry Collection The Glass Rooster is published by Auckland University Press.
Topics: author interview, books
Regions:
Tags: The Year of Falling
Duration: 9'10"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:39 Lucien Rizos
When Lucien Rizos isn’t rehearsing or playing with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra he’s wielding a telephoto lens. He’s been taking photographs on the country’s streets for several decades… now he’s zooming in on people in their cars at traffic lights. His exhibition Unposed Portraits is on at the Anna Miles Gallery.

12:47 Arts Attitudes
Creative New Zealand's released the results of its three-yearly survey into New Zealanders' attitudes, attendance and participation in the arts in 2014. Nine out of ten Kiwis have either attended or participated in at least one arts event in the past 12 months - the highest level of engagement since the surveys began in 2005.
But in Christchurch, despite a lot of lobbying and a lot of art being produced, fewer people there now believe art has a vital role in the city's post-earthquake rebuild.
CEO Stephen Wainwright explains how the questions were framed, because that plays a big part in how people answer, and what he hopes will come of the survey.
1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris
Simon Morris reviews the all-conquering Jurassic World, and the rather more minor hit Hot Pursuit, starring Reese Witherspoon. And the Spanish Oscar-nominated Marshlands delivers to the True Detective audience.
1:34 Flash Fiction
National Flash Fiction Day is a celebration of extremely short fiction (works consisting of 1000 words or less), and this year micro fiction, works consisting of a word count of 100 words or less, puts writers through their paces in a category called ‘Micro Madness', run by writers Eileen Merrimen and Nod Ghosh.

Eileen Merriman and Nod Ghosh
1:47 Séraphine Pick
Séraphine Pick has been painting for more than 20 years and she has a distinctive, lyrical style......now she's doing something that could be seen as dangerous... going in a new direction. Her works often meditate on dreams, memory and psychology.
For her new exhibition called White Noise, she's painted images she's found trawling the internet and set them in dreamlike landscapes. White Noise opens at The Dowse gallery this Saturday.

2:05 The Laugh Track
Web series creater, Sally Bollinger has made Nothing Much To Do, an Much Ado About Nothing adaption, it's 76 episodes long, with episodes of different lengths. Now she's working on a sequel called Lovely Little Losers, based on Love's Labours Lost, that comes out mid July. Visit the Nothing Much To Do playlist on YouTube.
2:26 Evan Roth
Evan Roth is an artist and researcher and also defines himself as a hacker. He's based in Paris and is heading our way to take part in the Semi-Permanent Design conference in Auckland in a couple of weeks. He's collaborated with Jay-Z on the first open source rap video. He's the co-founder of the Graffiti Research and Free Art & Technology Labs which web-based, open source research and development laboratories. Evan also teaches urban hacking, a course a New York City councilman has declared "an invitation to break the law."

2:38 The Invisible Mile
Competitive team cycling and warfare are inextricably linked in David Coventry's debut novel, The Invisible Mile, set during the 1928 Tour de France. This was the first time an English-speaking team had taken part in the gruelling competition, and it was made up of New Zealanders and Australians.There were no lightweight super-fast bikes back then. They competed on heavy fixed-wheel bikes with temperamental brakes and no lights. David has imagined what it would have been like being part of that team, but the story goes beyond the pain of his narrator during the long and arduous trip. David Coventry's novel The Invisible Mile is published by Victoria University Press.

2:49 The Year of Falling
Wellington writer Janis Freegard gives her protagonist Selina a great life - she's dating a hot celebrity chef and her career as a graphic designer is going well. Then she has a spectacular fall from grace, despite the best efforts of her supportive big sister Smith. And what’s with the mysterious china dolls that keep arriving on Selina’s doorstep? The Year of Falling is published by Makaro Press, while Janis’ new Poetry Collection The Glass Rooster is published by Auckland University Press.

3:05 The Drama Hour
The second omnibus edition of Goldhawk Essential's Indian police thriller - Undercover Mumbai.

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

4:06 The Sunday Feature 5:00 The 5 O'clock Report A roundup of today's news and sport 5:11 Spiritual Outlook Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ) 5:40 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi Māori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ) 6:06 Te Ahi Kaa Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ) 7:06 One in Five The issues and experience of disability (RNZ) 7:35 Voices Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ) 7:45 The Week in Parliament An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical for 21 June 2015 ( Part 1 )
BODY:
Stories of yesteryear from around New Zealand
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 53'39"

21:05
Sounds Historical for 21 June 2015 ( Part 2 )
BODY:
Stories of yesteryear from around New Zealand
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 53'36"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:08 Today in New Zealand History
A Literary Marriage, 21 June 1865. Lady Barker and Frederick Broome. 4'34"
8:14 Artist: The Song Spinners
(solos Neil Colquhoun, Arthur Weller, John Godden and Jack Murphy)
Song: Trade of the Kauri Gum
Composer: White
Label: Kiwi EA 58 3'29"
The words are a poem written by Samuel White which appeared in the Bulletin in 1896. It was recited widely in Northland in those days. The Song Spinners recorded several collections of New Zealand folk music in the 1960s.
Dick - when get started in gum
8:19 The Kauri Gum Industry in Northland
Selwyn Muru interviews son and father Dick Jurlina and Clem Jurlina at their gum store at Sweetwater in Northland. Recorded about 1970, they talk about the gum industry and the good relations between the Yugoslav gum diggers and Māori. Clem says many older diggers spoke Māori fluently and many Māori picked up the Yugoslav language also. Part One
Artist: Sons of the Gumdiggers
Song: Kolo
Composer: Trad
Album: Kolo
Label: Kiwi EA 170 10'07
8:31 The Yates Garden Guide - 120 years old
In a 1999 interview Yates New Zealand Limited managing director, Michael Skeggs, talks about the success of the Yates Garden Guide book, which was first published in
1895. He explains how the company knows when the millionth copy will be
Sold, and talks about the celebration of that fact. Kim Hill introduces the item. 4'08"
1998 Acquisition of Watkins New Zealand Ltd
2001 Scheme of Arrangement with Norgard Clohessy Equity Limited. NCE changed its name to Yates Limited.
2002 Transferred to purpose-built property in Neilson, St Onehunga
2003 Sale of Yates Vegetable Seeds
2003 Yates Limited sold Yates Australia & New Zealand to Orica Australia Pty Ltd
8:35 Artist: Suzanne Prentice
Song: The White Cliffs of Dover
Composer: Burton/Kent (1941)
Album: Memories are Made of This
Label: Manuka 2'42"
8:41 The Crystal Ball News Bulletin
From 1992 a spoof news bulletin written and read by Hewitt Humphrey in which he gives the news of the day as it might be in 2021. 4'08"
8:46 Artist: Rim D Paul and the Quin Tikis
Song: That Lucky Old Sun
Album: The Glamour
Label: Zodiac Hertage Vol 10 3'07"
8:51 War Report 41 21 June 2015
Newspaper reports of the first Lyttelton boy to be killed in action (59 more would follow during the rest of the war); Ernest Harston and Jim Meek complain about the food at Gallipoli while Jerry Duffull bemoans the lack of sleep there. Bank of New Zealand chairman Harold Beauchamp is reported as urging young bank staff to join up.
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There's a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It's a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
Artist: John McCormack
Song: Keep the Home Fires Burning
Album: Oh, It's a Lovely War Vol 1
Label: CD41 486286
8:57 Artist: Radio New Zealand Studio Orchestra
Song: I'll Put You Together Again
Composer: Black/Steven
Album: Orchestral Gold Vol 2
Label: Tartar TRL 005
9:07 As I Remember
The Jet Boat marathon on the 1970s by Allan Smith of Christchurch. Read by Duncan Smith. 3'41"
9:12 Artist: Ana Hato
Song: Home Sweet Home
Composer: Bishop/Payne
Album: Ana Hato
Label: Kiwi Pacific CD SLC 242 3'40"
Recorded at the opening of 1YZ Rotorua in April 1949.
9:16 Artist: The Beatles
Song: She Loves You
Composer: Lennon/McCartney
Album: The Beatles 1
Label: Parlophone 2'30"
9:19 Peter Sellers (who turned 94 last week) talks to fencer Brian Pickworth in 1969
Brian Pickworth was a one-armed Olympic fencer. He talks about how he got in fencing; sports he played at school - rugby and boxing. When he lost his arm he found fencing was similar to boxing in the footwork. He takes all of his sports seriously. He is proficient in all three weapons; he started with foil and progressed to the other weapons later. He won a Master of Arms trophy which is awarded to the most proficient in all weapons. 6:25
Pickworth competed individually and in teams in the sabre, épée and foil at the 1958, 1962, 1966, and 1970 Commonwealth Games. He competed at the 1960 Summer Olympics in all three disciplines.
9:26 Artist: The Hi Brows
Song: Two Timin' Lover
Composer: Galsner/Solomon
Album: For the Glamour
Label; Zodiac 1963 1'46"
9:29 Writer Dan Davin talks about his life in conversation with James McNeish.
Part 2 13'39"
This is the second part of the interview, the first having been broadcast in May.
9:42 Artist: Paul Lestre Group Paul Lestre, violin, sax, clarinet), Lyall Laurent (piano), Bob Ofsoki (bass) and Ray Gunter (guitar).
Song: Lullaby of Birdland
Composer: Shearing
Album: A Nite at the Hi Diddle Griddle
Label; Stebbing 1003 CD Recorded 1959 3'02"
From Chris Bourke' "Blue Smoke'
The Hi Diddle Griddle was once considered Auckland's "plushest nightclub". Opened in 1952, it introduced an alternative for cosmopolitan adults: a restaurant with live music. The owner was a man-about-town called Jim Jennings who had an obscure background: some thought he was an American expatriate, a South Pacific beachcomber who had 'washed ashore' after the war. Billy Farnell was certain he was from Tauranga. But he knew how to set up a room with class. Situated at 507 ('food from heaven') Karangahape Road, hospitality pioneer Otto Groen could be seen cooking in the window; chicken-in-a-basket made a change from colonial goose. On the dimly lit walls inside were black velvet murals of Polynesian maidens and a mythical Pacific, painted by Kristen Zambucka. The Hi Diddle Griddle had no dance floor and a tiny stage that showcased small combos led by Lew Campbell, Crombie Murdoch and Nancy Harrie. It would open late, and close even later - sometimes 4.00 am - and visiting musicians such as Nat King Cole might drop in. Late in the 1950s, Paul Lestre - a reed player and violinist from the East End of London - began a residency that led to the 1959 album A Night at the Hi Diddle Griddle, with pianist Lyall Laurent, bassist Bob Ofsoski and the city's leading jazz guitarist, Ray Gunter. The Hi Diddle Griddle inspired many other venues offering food garnished with music.
9:46 Book of the Week
Hocken, Prince of Collectors by Donald Jackson Kerr
Otago University Press
ISDN 9781877578663
Donald Kerr discusses his biography of Dr Thomas Hocken one of New Zealand's great book collectors. 14'00"
9:59 Artist: Radio New Zealand Studio Orchestra
Song: You Needed Me
Composer: Goodrum
Album: Orchestral Gold Vol 2
Label: Tartar TRL 005

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Sounds of the Spirit and of Satan: Five narratives drawing largely on the medieval world to explore sound as a battleground between good and evil - and as a hidden aspect of our daily struggle to achieve the 'life well-lived'. In a world dominated by religion, faith and hierarchy where the church's influence covers every aspect of how we 'hear' and shape the immediate world around us (3 of 6, BBC)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274368

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 21 Jun 2015

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