RNZ National. 2016-08-18. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

18 August 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Discovery (BBC); 1:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 2:05 The Cultural Frontline; 3:05 The Stove Rake, by Denise Keay, read by Tandi Wright (RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ) 5:10 Witness (BBC) 5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including:
6:16 and 6:50 Business News
6:26 Rural News
6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 18 August 2016
BODY:
Kiwisavers fund cluster bombs, mines and nukes, Lisa Carrington in finals for 500 metre individual kayaking, Water lobby wants chlorination considered for public water, Secondary schools reopen in Havelock North, Gaps in testing of giant sewage tank's steel, and ETS needs tweaking to meet climate change commitments
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 34'10"

06:06
Sports News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'27"

06:10
Lisa Carrington makes 500 metre kayak semi-finals
BODY:
Lisa Carrington was back out on on the water overnight, this time competing in the 500 metre individual kayaking.. Our Olympics repoirter Stephen Hewson
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Lisa Carrington, kayaking
Duration: 3'14"

06:18
Hospital food problems the low point for outgoing Southern DHB chief
BODY:
The departing head of the country's most troubled district health board says she could have handled hospital food problems better but leaves her job in Dunedin with few regrets
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'30"

06:21
Early Business News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'35"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'49"

06:38
Olympic offical arrested over illegal ticket sale scam
BODY:
Brazillian police have arrested the head of the European Olympic Committee over illegal ticket sales in Rio. We cross to the city to find out more.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Rio 2016 Olympics
Duration: 3'59"

06:42
Amnesty appalled Kiwisaver funds being invested in munitions
BODY:
Amnesty International wants Kiwisaver providers barred from investing in munitions companies.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 2'18"

06:44
End in sight to water crisis as some Havelock North schools reopen
BODY:
Secondary schools reopen in Havelock North today as anger continues over the time it's taking to find out what went wrong with the town's water supply.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: water supply
Duration: 3'33"

06:50
Fletcher Building counts on NZ construction sector
BODY:
The country's biggest listed company , Fletcher Building, is counting on its New Zealand operations to help it meet the company's growth targets, with strong contributions from its international portfolio.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Fletcher Building
Duration: 3'03"

06:53
NZX looking for H2 growth from investments
BODY:
Stock exchange operator NZX is hoping for a return to more normal business in the second half of the year after its first half profit was battered by legal costs.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: NZX
Duration: 1'05"

06:54
Earnings calender builds momentum today
BODY:
The big ones to watch out for are the telecommunications company, Spark, and the Port of Tauranga.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'09"

06:55
No change in RBNZ rate policy because of jobs
BODY:
To the economy, where the second quarter employment numbers don't seem to have convinced either the economists or the politicians.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'21"

06:57
Pressure coming from RBA over the state of budget
BODY:
To Australia, where the size of the federal government's budget deficit refuses to go away.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 59"

06:58
Markets
BODY:
An update on the markets
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'13"

06:59
Michael Hill settles tax dispute with Inland Revenue
BODY:
The jewellery retailer, Michael Hill International, has settled its long running tax dispute with a payment of 30-point-3 million dollars to Inland Revenue.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28"

07:06
Sports News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'27"

07:11
Kiwisavers fund cluster bombs, mines and nukes
BODY:
Calls for a review as an RNZ investigation uncovers what some default Kiwisaver schemes are actually investing in. And some investors might be surprised to know the results.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 3'33"

07:17
Lisa Carrington in finals for 500 metre individual kayaking
BODY:
An update from Rio - Gold medallist kayaker Lisa Carrington was back out on the water overnight and golfer Lydia Ko is moving up the leaderboard in the opening round of the women's golf.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Lisa Carrington
Duration: 2'51"

07:20
Water lobby wants chlorination considered for public water
BODY:
Water New Zealand wants a review into nationwide chlorination and whether it should be made compulsory following the gastro-bug outbreak in Havelock North. Morning report speaks to the industry body.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: water supply
Duration: 4'25"

07:26
Secondary schools reopen in Havelock North
BODY:
It's back to school today for secondary students in Havelock North as toxic water fears ease, but primary schools won't reopen until Monday
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'28"

07:28
Gaps in testing of giant sewage tank's steel
BODY:
The quality of steel in one of the country's largest sewage tanks is now in the gun after one expert says the test certificates for the Chinese steel are 'certainly fake.'
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: steel quality, steel
Duration: 4'35"

07:36
D'Agostino's injury knocks her out of 5000 metres final
BODY:
The American runner who ran to the finish line in Rio alongside Nikki Hamblin after they tripped over each other yesterday has pulled out of tomorrow's final - but she'll be in the stands cheering for Hamblin.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio 2016 Olympics
Duration: 1'46"

07:38
ETS needs tweaking to meet climate change commitments
BODY:
The Government says the Emissions Trading Scheme will have to be tweaked if New Zealand is to meet its climate change targets.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: ETS
Duration: 3'32"

07:42
Donald Trump reshuffles campaign team again
BODY:
We cross to Washington for the latest on Donald Trump's campaign team reshuffles.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'08"

07:46
Residents and mayor want sex offender gone
BODY:
Lower Hutt's mayor is backing a group of residents who want a child sex offender moved from his new home in their neighbourhood.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'04"

07:49
Fifty years on, Vietnam War commemorated
BODY:
New Zealand and Australia mark the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War today but plans for a service at the site of the Battle of Long Tan were cancelled abruptly yesterday by the Vietnam government.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Veitnam War
Duration: 4'07"

07:53
Veteran protestor Tim Shadbolt recalls Vietnam War
BODY:
A student protestor-turned mayor recalls how bitterly divisive the Vietnam war was for New Zealand, as today marks the 50th anniversary of the battle of Long Tan. We speak to Tim Shadbolt.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Vietnam War
Duration: 3'15"

07:57
Movie Museum design will representTe Upoko o te Ika Maui
BODY:
Morning Report speaks to the architects behind the 150 million dollar convention centre and movie museum given unanimous support by Wellington city councillors yesterday.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

08:06
Sports News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'55"

08:12
Lawrence Yule defends response to Havelock North outbreak
BODY:
Hastings mayor Lawrence Yule says Havelock North water supply will be chlorinated for the foreseeable future.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: water supply
Duration: 9'02"

08:20
Ireland reeling after arrest of Irish Olympic leader
BODY:
The head of the European Olympic Committee has been arrested by police after being linked to a major ticket touting operation
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Patrick Hickey
Duration: 3'38"

08:25
Kiwisaver members unaware of cluster bomb investments
BODY:
RNZ uncovers what some Kiwisaver providers are actually investing in and it's prompted calls for a review of the system. We reveal some default schemes are investing in companies producing weapons.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 4'09"

08:29
No pressure to remove lost luggage members' bill
BODY:
A National backbencher's bill about the sale of lost baggage has been roundly mocked in parliament...and blocked by NZ First. But the Government is forging ahead with it anyway.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: lost luggage
Duration: 2'17"

08:32
Markets Update for 18 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'15"

08:37
Analyst confident economy creating jobs, despite survey caution
BODY:
Analysts are confident the economy is creating more jobs, though they say new figures showing a slight drop in unemployment need to be treated with care.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: jobs
Duration: 3'23"

08:41
Lack of job opportunities hitting Northland hard
BODY:
We cross to Northland where Statistics NZ figures show unemployment is running at double the national average - at 10.6 percent. New figures show 131 thousand people were unemployed in the three months to June.
Topics:
Regions: Northland
Tags: jobs
Duration: 4'19"

08:46
Southern DHB plan to end money woes without cuts
BODY:
Debt-ridden Southland District Health Board vows to get its finances back on track and says it can do it without slashing services.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Southern DHB
Duration: 4'01"

08:50
Falling female enrolments at Canterbury University
BODY:
University of Canterbury's enrolment figures show for the first time in a decade, the rate of women students has dropped below half.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: University Of Canterbury
Duration: 3'01"

08:54
Road repair work in Lyttelton - Sumner corridor
BODY:
Christchurch gets cracking on repairs to the quake-damaged road linking Sumner to Lyttelton.
Topics: transport
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Sumner corridor
Duration: 3'28"

08:57
Fiji tourism revels in first ever Olympics gold
BODY:
Fiji's Rugby Sevens won gold in Rio and now it's casting a golden glow over the country's tourism industry.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio 2016 Olympics
Duration: 2'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including:
10:45 The Reading: Snapper in a Landscape (Part-2), written and told by Declan O'Neill. Irish New Zealand "snapper" and raconteur Declan O'Neil reads from the blog he kept detailing his back country photographic road trips accompanied by dogs Toby and Rufus. (Part 2 of 6, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Interest-free student loans: success or failure?
BODY:
A new report by the think tank The New Zealand Initiative finds that the scheme has failed to help students from poorer backgrounds access tertiary education. Kathryn Ryan speaks to head of research the the NZ Initiative, Dr Eric Crampton.
EXTENDED BODY:
The government should start charging interest on new student loans, the New Zealand Initiative think tank says.
In a new report, 'Decade of Debt: The cost of interest-free student loans', the group said the no-interest policy did not help poor students and had cost nearly $6 billion in written-off interest since it was introduced in 2006.
The savings made by charging interest could be used to provide more means-tested financial help for students from poor families and to better prepare poorly-performing secondary school students for tertiary education, it said.
New Zealand Initiative head researcher Eric Crampton said the zero-interest policy was an expensive failure.
"If the scheme [was] intended to improve tertiary accessibliity for low-income communities or non-traditional tertiary communities, it's failed magnificently in achieving that end, and it's failed to the tune of about $600 million per year in interest write-offs."
Charging interest on the loans was a "no brainer", he said.
Students paid about 18 percent of the cost of their education as a result of the policy, the report said.
That benefited rich and middle income families that could afford to pay more for their children's tertiary education, it said.
Tertiary institutions could be required to cover some of the cost of defaulted loans in order to encourage them to ensure their courses led to employment, it suggested.
As of June 2015, 730,000 people owed money to the loan scheme and by March this year, the total debt owed to the scheme was $15 billion.
The Child Poverty Action Group also recently suggested a rethink of interest on student loans.
Too many students, especially those with children, were in hardship and the government should increase both the number of students eligibile for allowances and the amount paid to them, the group said.
It might be worth considering whether interest should be charged on student loans as a trade-off for providing those increases, it said.
The no-interest policy had made it easier for governments and tertiary institutions to put more of the cost of studying onto students, the group said.

Topics: education, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20'12"

09:29
When tiredness is dangerous
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan talks to worker fatigue expert Professor Drew Dawson, who says organisations need to be aware that sleeplessness can affect performance as much as alcohol. So just how much sleep do you need before going to work? And what are the consequences of not getting enough?
EXTENDED BODY:
Worker fatigue expert Professor Drew Dawson says businesses need to be aware that the effects of fatigue on performance are similar to the effects of alcohol.
Professor Dawson is the director of the Appleton Institute at the Central Queensland University campus in Adelaide - one of the largest behavioural sleep research groups in Australia.
His research focuses on the effects of shift work and sleep loss on the health and well-being of employees.
One of the problems with fatigue-related errors is that they don't occur often enough for someone to change their behaviour.
“For example when you interview people who have fallen asleep driving, they’ll say ‘I’ve driven this tired plenty of times before and I’ve never died before’. So while people are quite good at estimating how fatigued they are, they are very poor at their capacity to judge how safe they are because the frequency of incidents is very low.”
Like taking drugs or alcohol, the effect of sleep deprivation starts off at low levels builds up over time.
“[With] drugs and alcohol, the more impaired you are, the poorer your decision making, but it can be quite different behavioural manifestations of that at low, moderate and high levels of fatigue.”
There has been a decline in the average number of hours of sleep over the last century, with a drop of around an hour and a half to two hours per night, Dawson says.
“I think we are facing an increasing generation of people who never catch up and because of the combination of work, family life and shall we say, the attraction of the options other than sleeping…”
“People will say to me how come people were getting 10 hours of sleep every night 100 years ago, and part of me will say, ‘Well, there wasn’t anything else to do’.”
Modern cultural expectations are also having an effect on the amount of sleep people get.
“A short sleeper is read in ways that make you seem more motivated, more likely to succeed. The sad reality is the facts don’t actually support that to the extent that people believe.”
“When we ask first year university students how much sleep they get and then they actually measure it on them, they tend to under estimate their sleep a lot because they want you to believe that they’re up partying every night and they’re living fabulous social lives.”
Topics: business, economy, health, life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'19"

09:47
Illegal ticketing scandal rocks Rio
BODY:
The head of the European Olympic Committee Irishman Patrick Hickey, has been arrested in Rio. It's the culmination of over a week of accusations and investigations. Nine to Noon talks to Irish sports journalist Niall Kelly who's in Brazil.
EXTENDED BODY:
The head of the European Olympic Committee Irishman Patrick Hickey, has been arrested in Rio. It's the culmination of over a week of accusations and investigations. Nine to Noon talks to Irish sports journalist Niall Kelly who's in Brazil.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, Ireland, Rio
Duration: 4'06"

09:51
UK correspondent Dame Ann Leslie
BODY:
Self-declared sports-hater Dame Ann Leslie on being glued to the Olympics and the arrest of London Islamist preacher Anjem Choudary.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 8'19"

10:10
Are you ready for self-driving cars?
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan speaks to futurist and autonomous vehicle expert Brad Templeton who says it's only a matter of a few years before cars, taxis, busses and trucks can drive themselves, park, recharge and deliver, saving millions of lives and the planet. The Silicon Valley entrepreneur spent two years advising Google's self-driving car team, and is involved in developing a small robotic delivery vehicle. Brad Templeton will be in Christchurch in November speaking at the Singularity University Summit.
Topics: media, business, economy, environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'52"

10:42
Book review - The Black Widow by Daniel Silva
BODY:
Reviewed by Gina Rogers, published by HarperCollins.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'02"

11:06
Havelock North High principal on water crisis
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan talks to Havelock North High School principal Greg Fenton about the water contamination crisis in the town, as the local council reveals a tanker used to supply clean drinking water, has been found to have e-coli bacteria.
Topics: environment
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: Havelock North, water
Duration: 8'49"

11:15
New technology with Robbie Allan
BODY:
Robbie Allan on the use of technology at the Olympics.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'55"

11:31
Preschool speech and language development
BODY:
How and when do pre-schoolers develop speech sounds? What is 'normal', and when should parents be concerned. Speech and Language therapist Christian Wright explains.
EXTENDED BODY:
What are 'normal' language skills for a preschooler? And when should parents be concerned?
Wellington speech and language therapist Christian Wright talks first first words and sounds with Kathryn Ryan.
At around 3 months months old, a baby will open their mouth and sound comes out - usually vowel sounds, with consonants coming at around 6 months old, says Christian.
By 12 months a baby will usually have played around with a small group of consonants and vowels and be ready to produce their first word.
In rough order, humans first form sounds at the front of the mouth with the lips, because lips are easy to bring together – Bs, Ps, Ms, Ns, Ds and Hs.
Over time, the tongue, teeth and lips start to interact, until at 1.5 to 2 years old Ks, Gs and sometimes F sounds are produced, followed a little bit later on by ‘shuh’ and ‘juh’, Rs and Ss.
At roughly 3.5 years, a child shouldn’t be making sounds at the back of their mouth. For example they shouldn’t still be making Ks and Gs into Ts and Ds.
When a child reaches 4 years old, an unfamiliar listener should understand two thirds or more of what the child is saying, says Christian.
If parents are concerned, it’s a good idea to write down some of the words your child is saying and how are they saying them, then look for what the sound change was. For example, if they’re saying ‘dun’ for ‘sun’ you know they’re turning Ss into Ds and can start to work with that.
Despite these recommendations, Christian says speech and language development is often not linear.
“I believe that parents always know when it’s not right.”
Christian Wright recommends parents refer to the language development charts on the website Little Bee Speech.
Related links
How to stimulate young children's languge (Nine to Noon, 26 May 2016)
Supporting your child's understanding of spoken language (Nine to Noon, 3 March 2016)
Topics: education, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'28"

11:50
Viewing with Duncan Greive
BODY:
Duncan Greive on NZ on Air funding of current affairs and two new HBO series - The Night Of, starring John Turturro and Vice Principals.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'41"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Interest-free student loans: success or failure?
[image:78356:third] no metadata
A new report by the think tank The New Zealand Initiative finds that the scheme has failed to help students from poorer backgrounds access tertiary education. Kathryn Ryan speaks to head of research the the NZ Initiative, Dr Eric Crampton.
09:20 When tiredness is dangerous
[image:53186:half]
Kathryn Ryan talks to worker fatigue expert Professor Drew Dawson, who says organisations need to be aware that sleeplessness can affect performance as much as alcohol.
So just how much sleep do you need before going to work? And what are the consequences of not getting enough?

09:30 Illegal ticketing scandal rocks Rio
The head of the European Olympic Committee Irishman Patrick Hickey, has been arrested in Rio. It's the culmination of over a week of accusations and investigations. Nine to Noon talks to Irish sports journalist Niall Kelly who's in Brazil.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGINTltIxqo
09:45 UK correspondent Dame Ann Leslie
Self-declared sports-hater Dame Ann Leslie on being glued to the Olympics and the arrest of London Islamist preacher Anjem Choudary.
10:05 Are you ready for self-driving cars?
[image:78063:half] no metadata
Kathryn Ryan speaks to futurist and autonomous vehicle expert Brad Templeton who says it's only a matter of a few years before cars, taxis, busses and trucks can drive themselves, park, recharge and deliver, saving millions of lives and the planet. The Silicon Valley entrepreneur spent two years advising Google's self-driving car team, and is involved in developing a small robotic delivery vehicle. Brad Templeton will be in Christchurch in November speaking at the Singularity University Summit.
10:35 Book review - The Black Widow by Daniel Silva
Reviewed by Gina Rogers, published by HarperCollins.
10:45 The Reading
Snapper in a Landscape written and told by Declan O'Neill. (Part 2 of 6)
11:05 New technology with Robbie Allan
Robbie Allan on the use of technology at the Olympics
11:25 Parenting with Christian Wright
[image:78360:half] no metadata
How and when do pre-schoolers develop speech sounds? What is 'normal', and when should parents be concerned. Speech and Language therapist Christian Wright explains.
http://littlebeespeech.com/resources/pdf/phonological_processes.pdf
11:45 Viewing with Duncan Greive
Duncan Greive on NZ on Air funding of current affairs and two new HBO series - The Night Of, starring John Turturro and Vice Principals

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Golden Harvest
Track: I Need Your Love
Composer: Kaukau
Album: Kiwi Gold Disc
Label: NZ on Air
Time:10.07

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
Government confirms Child Youth and Family's replacement and E-coli is found in water tanker stationed at a Havelock North high school.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'34"

12:17
Spark reports flat FY result, expects slow rate of growth ahead
BODY:
Telecommunications company Spark has reported a flat full-year profit -- with stronger mobile phone, IT and internet revenues offsetting a fall in fixed landline and a higher tax bill.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Spark
Duration: 1'57"

12:18
Port of Tauranga profit dips on weaker log traffic
BODY:
The Port of Tauranga has reported a slight fall in its annual profit on the back of higher costs and a fall in log exports.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Port of Tauranga
Duration: 1'09"

12:19
Trade Me profit dips on weak dating site
BODY:
Online trading and advertising platform Trade Me has seen its profit fall, after it wrote down the value of its poor performing dating website.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Trade Me
Duration: 1'25"

12:21
Skellerup FY result meets guidance, has positive growth outlook
BODY:
The industrial rubber manufacturer, Skellerup's net profit fell six percent to 20-point-5 million dollars, which was in line with guidance it gave earlier in the year.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Skellerup, Precinct, AMP
Duration: 1'11"

12:22
Job advertising rises again
BODY:
Job advertising is on the rise again, which an economist says points to solid economic growth.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Job advertising, jobs
Duration: 1'08"

12:23
Midday Markets for 18 August 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie from Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'50"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
Fonterra is paying out another 10 cents a share dividend for the 2015/16 season, taking the full pay out to 50 cents a share.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'02"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand women's hockey coach, Mark Hager, says Great Britain's grit and determination was too good for his team.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'50"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 18 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'33"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Havelock North Contamination Crisis widens
BODY:
The water contamination scare in Havelock North continues, with news a tanker delivering 'clean' water to residents, is also suspected of containing E coli.
EXTENDED BODY:
The water contamination scare in Havelock North continues, with news a tanker delivering 'clean' water to residents, is also suspected of containing E coli.
This morning, it was revealed by Mayor Lawrence Yule, said there could be a potential cross contamination with a piggery and mushroom farm, in the area.
Hastings District Council, has held a press conference this morning, with an update on the health and water situation. RNZ's Hawke's Bay reporter, Peter Fowler, was at the conference and has all the latest details.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: Havelock North
Duration: 9'14"

13:24
Anger over Vietnam's cancellation of war commemoration service
BODY:
Today is the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, and Vietnam has abruptly banned the commemoration service.
EXTENDED BODY:
Today is the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, and Vietnam has abruptly banned the commemoration service. The service took eighteen months of planning, and there are a dozen New Zealand veterans in Vietnam for the occasion, with about one thousand Australian veterans and their families .

John Bell, the New Zealand owner of Belly's Watering Hotel bar, in Vung Tau says the veterans are very upset after making the trip to Vietnam.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: Vietnam War, Vietnam
Duration: 11'59"

13:36
10,000 new blood donors needed
BODY:
The New Zealand blood service wants 10 thousand new donors so it can continue to meet demand.
EXTENDED BODY:
The New Zealand blood service wants 10 thousand new donors so it can continue to meet demand. Every year the 28 thousand people come off the registry for various reasons, such as age, and illness.
Asuka Burge from the Blood Service says new sign ups are needed
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: blood, New Zealand blood service
Duration: 5'00"

13:41
Favourite album: John Martyn - Solid Air
BODY:
Chosen by Nik Curry.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'52"

14:07
Katherine Mansfield Menton Fellowship Saved
BODY:
After an intensive fundraising effort - the Winn-Manson Menton Trust, and the Arts Foundation have managed to raise 800 thousand dollars, which means the Katherine Mansfield Menton fellowship has been saved.
EXTENDED BODY:
Since 1970 the prestigious Katherine Mansfield Menton fellowship has been awarded to a New Zealand writer each year. They get 6 months or more to the writing room in the Villa Isola Bella where Katherine Mansfield once lived in South Eastern France.
But when new Zealand Post pulled its sponsorship four years ago - the trust that administered the fellowship could not find a new one. But after an intensive fundraising effort - the Winn-Manson Menton Trust, and the Arts Foundation have managed to raise 800 thousand dollars, which means the Menton fellowship will continue.
Simon Bowden is the Executive Director of the Arts Foundation
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Katherine Mansfield Menton fellowship
Duration: 8'07"

14:16
Theatre Critic, Terry MacTavish
BODY:
Reviewing 'Grounded' By George Brant, directed by Jonathon Hendry and on at the Fortune Theatre, Dunedin.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Grounded, theatre
Duration: 8'49"

14:31
Money with Mary Holm
BODY:
Mary Holm discusses kiwisaver and ethical investment, and her approach to investing in shares - is it really 'dangerous'.
Topics: money
Regions:
Tags: Mary Holm
Duration: 14'01"

15:06
Masterpieces with Vincent Ward
BODY:
Each week we get a well known guest on the show to nominate what they consider to be a masterpiece in their field. This week that masterpiece is a person, who has been nominated by Vincent Ward, the New Zealand filmmaker and artist.
EXTENDED BODY:
Each week we get a well known guest on the show to nominate what they consider to be a masterpiece in their field. This week that masterpiece is a person, who has been nominated by Vincent Ward, the New Zealand filmmaker and artist.
Vincent Ward has an exhibition opening this month at the Trish Clark gallery in Auckland, in which his canvas is the human body.
But it is another artist he has nominated as his masterpiece: landscape photographer, Laurence Aberhart
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Vincent Ward
Duration: 17'40"

15:24
The Expats: Nathan Morris, NYC film-maker
BODY:
Filmmaker Nathan Morris is a lad from the Hutt Valley now based in New York, and his first short film is making critical waves there.
EXTENDED BODY:
Filmmaker Nathan Morris is a lad from the Hutt Valley now based in New York, and his first short film is making critical waves there.
Nathan has only been in New York for eight months, after 16 years in London, but is already enjoying life there.
His film At Dawn has just won the directors’ choice award at the Rhode Island international film festival.
He sank his life savings into the film, which he says has been a useful calling card as he works to break into the New York industry.
“There’s a lot of work here, but it’s very hard as a director to get your foot in the door.”
Nathan says his reasons for moving to New York weren’t entirely professional.
“My heart, it was for a girl that I met.”
And so far he has had no regrets about the trans-Atlantic move.
“New York is a very, very convenient city; the people are lovely, intelligent, smart and super friendly.”
He spent 2 to 3 years writing At Dawn.
“I’m a very slow writer, I thought about it a lot. It’s about an insomniac who drives around London at night delivering ice to bars and cafes and night clubs.”
He was struck by that nocturnal service when he lived in London.
“I thought that was very odd. Why don’t they just have ice machines? And then I met a guy, he was an insomniac, insomnia ruined his life couldn’t hold down a job."
So he put the two things together to make the central character in At Dawn.
New York isn’t without challenges, Nathan says.
"It’s hard to break into the industry here, there’s so much trust involved in directing, you’ve got to prove yourself - even though I’ve been doing it for 20 years.”
Although being a Kiwi in New York is no disadvantage, he says.
“You meet people in New York and they say, ‘Where are you from?’ and you say ‘New Zealand’ and they say, ‘that’s amazing’
“I’ve even achieved something here just by being born!”
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: expats
Duration: 10'27"

15:35
This Way Up
BODY:
This Way Up's Simon Morton met some of the dogs being trained to assist people with epilepsy.
EXTENDED BODY:
Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterised by recurrent seizures that affects up to 2 percent of the population here in New Zealand, and about 50 million people worldwide.
As well as taking medication to manage their symptoms, some people with epilepsy are also getting help from trained dogs.
These epilepsy assist dogs can help people through a seizure, protect them from injury, and can even act as an early warning system. This Way Up's Simon Morton met some of the dogs.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'06"

15:48
One Quick Question for 18 August 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'33"

15:51
The Panel pre-show for 18 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Havelock North Contamination Crisis widens
The water contamination scare in Havelock North continues, with news a tanker delivering 'clean' water to residents, is also suspected of containing E coli. And this morning, it was revealed by Mayor Lawrence Yule, said there could be a potential cross contamination with a piggery and mushroom farm, in the area. Hastings District Council, has held a press conference this morning, with an update on the health and water situation.
RNZ's Hawke's Bay reporter, Peter Fowler, was at the conference.
1:25 Anger over Vietnam's cancellation of war commemoration service
[image:19412:full]
Today is the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, and Vietnam has abruptly banned the commemoration service. The service took eighteen months of planning, and there are a dozen New Zealand veterans in Vietnam for the occasion, with about one thousand Australian veterans and their families .

John Bell, the New Zealand owner of Belly's Watering Hotel bar, in Vung Tau says the veterans are very upset after making the trip to Vietnam.
1:30 10,000 new blood donors needed
[image:78402:full]
The New Zealand blood service wants 10 thousand new donors so it can continue to meet demand. Every year the 28 thousand people come off the registry for various reasons, such as age, and illness.
Asuka Burge from the Blood Service says new sign ups are needed
1:40 Favourite album: John Martyn - Solid Air
2:10 Katherine Mansfield Menton Fellowship Saved
[image:78399:full]
Since 1970 the prestigious Katherine Mansfield Menton fellowship has been awarded to a New Zealand writer each year. They get 6 months or more to the writing room in the Villa Isola Bella where Katherine Mansfield once lived in South Eastern France.
But when new Zealand Post pulled its sponsorship four years ago - the trust that administered the fellowship could not find a new one. But after an intensive fundraising effort - the Winn-Manson Menton Trust, and the Arts Foundation have managed to raise 800 thousand dollars, which means the Menton fellowship will continue.
Simon Bowden is the Executive Director of the Arts Foundation
2:20 Theatre Critic, Terry MacTavish
2:30 Money with Mary Holm
Mary Holm discusses kiwisaver and ethical investment, and her approach to investing in shares - is it really 'dangerous'.
3:10 Masterpieces with Vincent Ward
Each week we get a well known guest on the show to nominate what they consider to be a masterpiece in their field. This week that masterpiece is a person, who has been nominated by Vincent Ward, the New Zealand filmmaker and artist.
Vincent Ward has an exhibition opening this month at the Trish Clark gallery in Auckland, in which his canvas is the human body.
[image:78414:full]
But it is another artist he has nominated as his masterpiece: landscape photographer, Laurence Aberhart
[image:78412:full]
3:25 The Expats: Nathan Morris, NYC film-maker
Our expat this week is a former Hutt Valley lad who is now a New York based director whose first short film At Dawn has just won the directors choice award at the Rhode Island international film festival.
[gallery:2384]
3:30 This Way Up
Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterised by recurrent seizures that affects up to 2 percent of the population here in New Zealand, and about 50 million people worldwide.
As well as taking medication to manage their symptoms, some people with epilepsy are also getting help from trained dogs.
These epilepsy assist dogs can help people through a seizure, protect them from injury, and can even act as an early warning system. This Way Up's Simon Morton met some of the dogs.
[gallery:2377]
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:48
One Quick Question for 18 August 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'33"

15:51
The Panel pre-show for 18 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'31"

16:03
The Panel with Julia Hartley-Moore and Tony Doe (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Julia Hartley-Moore and Tony Doe have been up to. Lisa Carrington, Lydia Ko, Ryan Lochte and Emma Trott. Irish boxer Michael Conlan hasn't held back on amateur boxing cheats. We talk to former champ Billy Graham. Law lecturer Marcelo Rodriquez-Ferrere of Otago talks about why Corrections doesn't want Mike White there when Gerald Hope meets Scott Watson.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'50"

16:05
The Panel with Julia Hartley-Moore and Tony Doe (Part 1
BODY:
Is love never having to say you're sorry - as the character in the film Love Story says? What the Panelists Julia Hartley-Moore and Tony Doe have been thinking about. The re-fit of the TVNZ building in Auckland has cost more than double the original budget. New research finds interest-free student loans have led to increased borrowing and students taking longer to pay them off. A High Court judge says the safety risk of foreign drivers is an issue of "widespread public concern
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'12"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Julia Hartley-Moore and Tony Doe have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'45"

16:10
Rio update
BODY:
Lisa Carrington, Lydia Ko, Ryan Lochte and Emma Trott. Irish boxer Michael Conlan hasn't held back on amateur boxing cheats. We talk to former champ Billy Graham.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, Rio
Duration: 18'29"

16:28
Journalist barred from Scott Watson meeting
BODY:
Law lecturer Marcelo Rodriquez-Ferrere of Otago talks about why Corrections doesn't want Mike White there when Gerald Hope meets Scott Watson.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: Scott Watson
Duration: 3'16"

16:34
Love and romance
BODY:
Is love never having to say you're sorry - as the character in the film Love Story says?
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: love
Duration: 3'22"

16:37
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Julia Hartley-Moore and Tony Doe have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: love
Duration: 6'07"

16:43
TVNZs $60m revamp
BODY:
The re-fit of the TVNZ building in Auckland has cost more than double the original budget.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: TVNZ
Duration: 2'17"

16:46
Interest-free student loans
BODY:
New research finds interest-free student loans have led to increased borrowing and students taking longer to pay them off.
Topics: politics, education
Regions:
Tags: loans
Duration: 7'43"

16:53
Foreign drivers
BODY:
A High Court judge says the safety risk of foreign drivers is an issue of "widespread public concern".
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: loans
Duration: 3'19"

16:56
Beneficiaries debt
BODY:
The Government has no idea how much money it lends to beneficiaries to stay in motels, the Ministry for Social Development has admitted
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'04"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Thursday 18th August 2016
BODY:
Watch Thursday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:09
Hawke's Bay water crisis escalates
BODY:
Thousands of people in the Hastings District are now under a boil water notice after an E coli 'indicator' was found in a water tanker that took water from the Hastings aquifer.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: water, E coli, Hastings
Duration: 4'20"

17:13
Hastings District Mayor Lawrence Yule on water crisis
BODY:
Hastings District Mayor Lawrence Yule joins Checkpoint to discuss the latest on the region's drinking water crisis.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: water, Hastings, E coli
Duration: 8'41"

17:21
Full investigation into water crisis needed - Health Minister
BODY:
Health Minister Jonathan Coleman, who has just returned from Rio, joins Checkpoint to discuss the Havelock North water contamination crisis and the government inquiry announced today.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: water, Hastings, E coli
Duration: 3'36"

17:25
New Ministry for Vulnerable Children raises doubts
BODY:
There's no evidence the new Ministry for Vulnerable Children - Oranga Tamariki will do a better job than Child, Youth and Family, Labour says.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: vulnerable children
Duration: 4'11"

17:29
PM dismisses concerns about KiwiSaver investments
BODY:
The government is dismissing concerns about some KiwiSaver funds being invested in companies making bombs and mines.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 3'15"

17:35
Evening business for 18 August 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Spark, TradeMe, Port of Tauranga, markets
Duration: 2'10"

17:38
High hopes Walsh and Carrington will win medals overnight
BODY:
New Zealanders didn't win any medals at the Olympics in Rio today, but there are high hopes overnight for Tom Walsh in the shotput and Lisa Carrington on the water.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio 2016 Olympics, Tom Walsh, Lisa Carrington
Duration: 2'36"

17:44
Kapiti Coast council proposal on ashes 'bonkers'
BODY:
A proposed ban on scattering ashes in public places in Kapiti, north of Wellington, is being called "stupid" and "unworkable".
EXTENDED BODY:
A proposed ban on scattering ashes in public places in Kapiti, north of Wellington, is being called unnecessary and unworkable.
The Kapiti Coast District Council's draft bylaw, expected to be approved next month, proposes to ban people from emptying urns on beaches, rivers and parks.
The council's website already states that scattering ashes in public places is not permitted.
Funeral Directors Association chief executive Katrina Shanks said it was "bonkers" that grieving families should be required to get a permit if they wanted to scatter their loved one's ashes.
The council has responded by saying the bylaw was more of a guide than a decree that they would actively enforce.
But Ms Shanks said she wasn't convinced.
"Actually, I think it goes a bit further than that proposed bylaw. I think it's actually intending to be that if you're a greiving family and you'd like to scatter the ashes of your loved one, you have to go to the council and receive written approval to do that."
About 70 percent of New Zealanders were cremated, although many were interred into plots, she said.
It was a private and respectful time and most mourners were sensitive to environmental and cultural considerations, she said.
"I don't believe that you need to regulate if there is no evidence of harm, and we haven't seen any evidence of harm in this instance."
Guidelines would be more appropriate than formal regulations, she said.
"When the families come in and say 'we're going to scatter our ashes', the funeral directors can give them some expert advice in how to do that and the sensitive issues around [it]."
Earlier this year, several iwi said they should be consulted on where ashes could be scattered to avoid it happening in sacred areas or places were seafood was gathered.
Related

Topics: life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: funerals, Ashes, Kapiti Coast
Duration: 3'01"

17:47
Music industry wants TPP copyright phase in to be dropped
BODY:
The music industry says the phase in period to extend copyright from 50 to 70 years under the Trans Pacific Partnership agreement is cumbersome and costly.
Topics: music, politics, law
Regions:
Tags: copyright, TPP
Duration: 2'55"

17:52
Music centre The Piano opens in Christchurch
BODY:
A world class centre for music and the arts has opened in Christchurch, after The Music Centre of Christchurch was damaged beyond repair in the 2011 earthquakes.
EXTENDED BODY:
Performers in Christchurch are rejoicing over the opening of a world-class centre for music and the arts in the city.
The building, known as The Piano because its design was inspired by the curves of a grand piano, has replaced The Music Centre of Christchurch, which was damaged beyond repair in the 2011 earthquakes.
Small finishing touches are still being added to the $16.8 million facility, which doesn't officially open until next month.
Topics: music
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Music Centre of Christchurch
Duration: 3'03"

17:55
Dancing baby kiwi video goes viral
BODY:
The night-time habits of a dancing baby kiwi caught on camera at Dunedin's Orokonui Ecosanctuary is going viral.
Topics: environment
Regions: Otago
Tags: Orokonui Ecosanctuary, dancing baby kiwi
Duration: 3'14"

18:09
Te Mata Mushrooms owner open to investigations
BODY:
Te Mata Mushrooms is near the bores where Havelock North's water comes from and forms part of the council's investigation. Its owner Michael Whittaker joins Checkpoint.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: water, Hastings, E coli
Duration: 8'36"

18:18
Chch locals fed up with late night noise
BODY:
The agency in charge of fixing earthquake damaged pipes and roads in Christchurch was last night issued an excessive noise notice after keeping residents awake in the early hours.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: noise, roadworks, Christchurch, earthquakes
Duration: 3'29"

18:24
Think tank calls for interest on student loans
BODY:
Public policy think tank New Zealand Initiative is calling on the government to start charging interest on new student loans from 2018.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: student loans, interest write-offs
Duration: 2'13"

18:50
Today In Parliament Thursday 18 August 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
The Government announces an inquiry into the contamination of drinking water in Havelock North, but only after Labour's deputy leader and health spokeswoman, Annette King, raises the issue again in the House. Speaker upholds complaints from New Zealand First leader, Winston Peters, and Labour's chief whip, Chris Hipkins, about the Prime Minister's delay in correcting a mistake in an answer to a correction. Instead of making the correction by way of a personal statement, Mister Key waited to include it as a clarification when answering another question the following day. But the Speaker rules that Social Development Minister, Anne Tolley, was in order to refuse to admit the imminent creation of a ministry for vulnerable children the day before the official announcement of its formation.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'06"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Darcy Richardson: third-party candidates

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:10
Alicia Sudden, Researcher
BODY:
Victoria University Student Alicia Sudden has looked at the changes to the welfare system introduced in July 2013 and beneficiaries told her the reforms are failing to help them get into quality employment. Alicia Sudden is with Bryan Crump to discuss her research and what the beneficiaries told her.
Topics: life and society, politics, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'26"

20:08
Nights' Culture - Charlotte Wilson
BODY:
Tonight Charlotte covers the inuaugural Maori Music Month and Dame Gillian Whitehead, currently in the UK for the world premiere of her new opera. She also looks at a new venue in in Christchurch, The Piano and her favourite New Zealand piano music album, Lilburn by Michael Houston, who also has a Bach concert in Wellington this weekend. She's also looking at the great classical musical festival - the 122nd season of The BBC Proms.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'10"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Alicia Sudden, Researcher
[image:78054:full]
Victoria University Student Alicia Sudden has looked at the changes to the welfare system introduced in July 2013 and beneficiaries told her the reforms are failing to help them get into quality employment. Alicia Sudden is with Bryan Crump to discuss her research and what the beneficiaries told her.

7:35 New Horizons
[image:76948:half]
After viewing the opening ceremony of the Rio Olympics, William Dart checks out the great Brazilian musicians featured there: Paulinho da Viola, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and Elza Soares.

8:12 Nights' Culture - Charlotte Wilson
[image:64835:third]

Tonight Charlotte covers the inuaugural Maori Music Month and Dame Gillian Whitehead, currently in the UK for the world premiere of her new opera. She also looks at a new venue in in Christchurch, The Piano and her favourite New Zealand piano music album, Lilburn by Michael Houston, who also has a Bach concert in Wellington this weekend.
She's also looking at the great classical musical festival - the 122nd season of The BBC Proms.

8:30 Window on the World
BBC World service has a rare encounter with one of Brazil's most extraordinary poets. Adélia Prado has shunned the spotlight since her discovery in 1976 - then a 40-year-old mother of five living in the interior state of Minas Gerais. Now aged 80, her sensual, devout, sometimes provocative poetry is read and admired around the world.
9:07 Our Changing World
[image:78116:third]
Tonight Alison Ballance looks into Geonet. She heads to the briefing room at GNS Science to find out from Ken Gledhill and Caroline Little how earthquake detection has improved from something that used to take weeks to becoming a sophisticated network of seismic monitors and GPS stations that can pinpoint the exact location, size and depth of a shake within a few seconds. Also on Our Changing World Sonia Sly looks at online dating and the promises to guarantee finding love, with research showing that 1 in 5 new relationships and 1 in 6 marriages are through online dating. She looks at how to navigate the pitfalls of meeting Mr or Mrs Right in the virtual world, when she meets Martin Graff, a reader in Psychology at the University of South Wales.

9:30 This Way Up
Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles are another piece of technology- like GPS, the microwave, nylon and the wristwatch before them- that have migrated from the military to the mainstream.Powered by cheap electronic componentry and controlled using smartphones, one day they could deliver the goods you buy online straight to your door. And in the meantime you can race them too! A New Zealand team is headed for the Olympics of drone racing, the World Drone Racing Championships, that take place in Hawaii in October. This Way Up's Simon Morton sampled the local RotorCross scene.
[gallery:2361]

10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 Music 101 pocket edition
[image:77540:quarter]
In this week's Music 101 Pocket Edition Arrested Development talk social activism, Australian sample heavy hip-hop trio The Avalanches on why it took 16 years to make an album, and a look back at The Reduction Agents, ten years on.

===7:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music commentator and critic William Dart offers fascinating insights and surprising links across contemporary music.

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | Our Changing World===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlights from the world of science and the environment, with Alison Ballance

===9:30 PM. | This Way Up===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring the things we use and consume. Some content may offend. (RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

Getting the right amount of sleep on Nine to Noon and Morning Report goes to the movies..
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on New Zealand/Aotearoa (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288313

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 18 Aug 2016

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