RNZ National. 2016-06-13. 00:00-23:59.

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Year
2016
Reference
288247
Media type
Audio
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Rights Information
Year
2016
Reference
288247
Media type
Audio
Item unavailable online
Series
Radio New Zealand National. 2015--. 00:00-23:59.
Categories
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings
Untelescoped radio airchecks
Duration
24:00:00
Credits
RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

13 June 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Dan Slevin (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 The Cave of Winds by Elspeth Sandys (1 of 4, RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ); 5:10 To the Max by Mark Inglis (6 of 10, RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday 13 June 2016
BODY:
European football's governing body UEFA is threatening to expel England and Russia from the Euro 2016 tournament in France if fan violence continues.The police are not giving up the search for a toddler who has been missing for more than three days, after the 4-wheel drive she was in became stranded in a flooded river on the West Coast.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'13"

06:06
Sports News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'00"

06:15
50 dead in Orlando nightclub shooting
BODY:
A gunman has killed 50 people in a crowded gay nightclub in Orlando in Florida. For the latest, we cross to our US correspondent Mimi Chiahemen.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Orlando, Pulse, Florida, Nightclub, shooting
Duration: 5'31"

06:20
Early Business News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'07"

06:27
Morning Rural News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'15"

06:50
NZ Q1 growth and Federal Reserve to set agenda
BODY:
It's another significant week for local economic numbers and central bank action.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 4'48"

06:54
NZX's Smartshares business turns 20
BODY:
The sharemarket operator, NZX, says its Smartshares passive funds are increasingly popular with retail investors, with a far greater range available than there were 20 years ago when they were first launched.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: NZX, Sharefunds, Smartshares
Duration: 1'41"

06:56
Jim Parker in Australia
BODY:
Australia's corporate regulator has launched a landmark case under new laws to protect consumers against bad financial advice.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 56"

06:57
The week ahead
BODY:
A look at this week's business agenda
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'07"

06:58
Morning markets for 13 June 2016
BODY:
The Dow Jones index fell about two thirds of a percent - down 120 points to 17,865.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 54"

07:06
Sports News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'08"

07:18
Florida nightclub shooting leaves 50 dead
BODY:
The latest on the Florida nightclub shooting with, Josh Miranda, an anchor/reporter at News 96-point-five W-D-B-O in Orlando.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Pulse, Nightclub, Orlando, Florida, shooting
Duration: 4'14"

07:18
Violence sparks threat to expel Russia & England from Euro 2016
BODY:
European football's governing body UEFA is threatening to expel England and Russia from the Euro 2016 tournament in France if fan violence continues.
Topics: crime, sport
Regions:
Tags: football, violence, England, Russia, Euro 2016, Marseilles
Duration: 4'52"

07:35
West Coast search to resume today for 2 year old Emily Saunders
BODY:
The police are not giving up the search for a toddler who has been missing for more than three days, after the 4-wheel drive she was in became stranded in a flooded river on the West Coast.
Topics: life and society, rural
Regions: West Coast
Tags: search, Poerua River
Duration: 3'39"

07:37
Leaky homes debacle is set to spread
BODY:
A leading lawyer for owners of leaky homes is warning of a new multi billion dollar construction industry failure, this time involving rusting structural steel used in concrete buildings.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: leaky homes, steel, St Lukes Garden
Duration: 3'55"

07:41
Wales head to the Waikato to take on the Chiefs
BODY:
The Welsh rugby team has headed to Waikato to take on the Chiefs, and to perhaps shake off the feeling that they let a rare chance to beat the All Blacks slip from their grasp.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby, Wales, The Cheifs, All Blacks
Duration: 5'11"

07:46
Public Transport patronage to miss targets in Auckland
BODY:
Aucklander's perceptions of public transport appear to be worsening, and patronage on the biggest part of the network is down on last year.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: public transport
Duration: 3'39"

07:50
Fear of a housing bubble burst bring fears of negative equity
BODY:
As Auckland house prices continue to rise, so too do fears of a bust.
Topics: business, economy, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: house prices, Burst
Duration: 2'56"

07:53
Govt to respond to restrictions on lending to foreign buyers
BODY:
Prime Minister John Key joins Guyon in the Auckland studio.
Topics: housing, economy
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: house prices, Burst, Orlando
Duration: 6'22"

08:06
Sports News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'54"

08:10
U.S. official: No evidence of I.S link to Orlando shooting
BODY:
More details are emerging about the gunman who shot and killed at least 50 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Orlando, Florida, Pulse, Nightclub, shooting
Duration: 5'55"

08:16
LGBT community responds to mass shooting in Florida
BODY:
Rob Domenico is from the L-G-B-T Community Center of Central Florida.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Orlando, Florida, Pulse, Nightclub, shooting
Duration: 3'27"

08:20
Police blunder blamed for fraudster escaping prison
BODY:
A police blunder has been blamed for a convicted fraudster escaping jail for her latest offence.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: fraud, police
Duration: 4'25"

08:24
Norfolk Island officials drumming up support ahead of takeover
BODY:
Norfolk Island leaders are making a last minute bid to stop Australia revoking their independence.
Topics: politics, Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Norfolk Island, Australia, independence
Duration: 5'38"

08:30
Markets Update for 13 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'09"

08:35
Lydia Ko chasing third straight major win
BODY:
Lydia Ko is maintaining her lead in the final round of the Women's PGA Championship in Washington state as she chases her third straight major win.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: golf
Duration: 2'01"

08:38
Leaky St Lukes apartment owners fight back
BODY:
Residents of an Auckland apartment complex seeking the largest leaky-homes claim ever filed in New Zealand have spoken of the anger and despair that's driven them to court.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: St Lukes Garden Apartments, Leaky Buildings
Duration: 3'40"

08:41
Asian-focused trade talks underway in Auckland
BODY:
The Trade Minister, Todd McClay is backing controversial rules for an Asian focused trade deal that allow foreign corporations to sue governments.
Topics: economy, politics
Regions:
Tags: R-Cep, trade, Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership
Duration: 4'19"

08:46
University promotions under scrutiny
BODY:
Research released to RNZ News has detailed the huge pay gap between top male and female academics at New Zealand universities.
Topics: inequality
Regions:
Tags: Gender Bias, Universities, sexism
Duration: 5'38"

08:54
Last of Maori Battalion's A company has died
BODY:
Charlie Petera fought with the the 28th Maori Battalion's A Company or "Gum-Diggers", in North Africa and Italy between 1941 and 1945.
Topics: history, defence force, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Gum-Diggers, Maori Battalion
Duration: 2'34"

08:57
Phil Kafcaloudes with news from Australia
BODY:
Time to chat to our Melbourne correspondent Phil Kafcaloudes.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 2'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The War in Sardinia, by Lloyd Jones, read by William Kircher. The story of a New Zealander with German parents interned on Somes Island in Wellington harbour during World War II. (1 of 5)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Mass shooting in an Orlando nightclub
BODY:
The latest from the mass shooting at a nightclub in Orlando, Florida where 50 people have been killed.
Topics: crime, security
Regions:
Tags: Pulse, Nightclib, Orlando, Florida, shooting
Duration: 19'13"

09:27
Is a bumper year for tourism paying off & what are the costs?
BODY:
Since 2013 visitor arrivals to New Zealand have jumped from 2.6 million to 3.26 million in 2016. Analysis indicates these numbers will increase significantly by 2020 - potentially to 4.2 million or more. Are we ready?
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: tourism
Duration: 24'40"

09:52
Building Sustainable Homes
BODY:
Housing in New Zealand faces many challenges - not least reversing the health impacts of low-quality homes while meeting exploding demand. How do we resolve these thorny issues to create resilient, liveable homes and communities?
EXTENDED BODY:
Housing in New Zealand faces many challenges - not least reversing the health impacts of low-quality homes while meeting exploding demand. How do we resolve these thorny issues to create resilient, liveable homes and communities?
Kathryn Ryan talks to Andrea Reimer who was a driving force behind Vancouver becoming the world's fourth greenest city. As part of the city's goal to become the world's greenest city by 2020, Andrea says that only seven years into it, Vancouver has already reduced waste production and water consumption by 18 percent and greenhouse gas emissions have dropped 8 percent in the city, despite a rising population.
As in New Zealand, building medium-density, quality, affordable housing is an issue for Vancouver. Andrea says a thoughtful approach is necessary.
"If you're planning well what you do get is a community where seniors can find housing in as they age out of their single-family homes, you've got housing for families, you've got a rental market that's more accessible for people.
Andrea is sharing her ideas to Auckland's Sustainable Housing Summit.
Topics: housing, environment
Regions:
Tags: housing market, sustainability, Vancouver
Duration: 7'50"

10:08
Museums: portals to the past, windows to the future
BODY:
From pop-up exhibits to helping people get tattoos of artworks, museums are making a big effort to keep up with the digital age, but US museum guru and futurist Elizabeth Merritt says we shouldn't get too obsessed with technology.
EXTENDED BODY:
From pop-up exhibits to helping people get tattoos of artworks, museums are making a big effort to keep up with the digital age, but US museum guru and futurist Elizabeth Merritt tells Kathryn Ryan that we shouldn't get too obsessed with technology.
Elizabeth Merritt is founding director of the Centre for the Future of Museums and the American Alliance of Museums' Vice President of Strategic Foresight.
Interview highlights
Elizabeth Merritt: Museums still have audiences that are predominantly white, wealthy and older, so we have a lot of work to do to diversify our audiences to ensure we remain relevant.
There’s been some very interesting research done in the US… that finds that people that are devoted museum-goers, most of them have a very clear memory of their youth, sometime between the ages of 7 and 9 years old, of having a transformative museum experience, being bowled over by a dinosaur or being immersed in a historic house or seeing a beautiful painting.
The ‘cabinets of curiosity’ in the 19th century were in some ways the progenitors of the modern museum where things are displayed in a temple-like atmosphere with glass cases and labels… There’s been much more of a shift in the last 100 years towards the more democratic community based models of museum saying ‘What are the needs of the community? How can we help them? If this is a working community what do people need to help educate them for better jobs? What are things they want to know about to become better citizens?’ This kind of shift to museums being service-oriented rather than necessarily the purveyors of high culture and teaching what people ought to know is one of the things that are helping them win new audiences.
Traditionally, the people who have run museums and curated museums come out of academia and the tradition that they were promoted in and the tradition that values their work is an academic tradition of behaving and talking a certain way in synch with your peers and being recognised by your peers.
There’s this false dichotomy we’ve created between something being fun and exciting and intriguing and interesting and things that are true and important and people ought to know. I think there’s no reason not to merge those two things and the best museums do that. They create educational experiences that are fun and addictive and intriguing that people really enjoy and they become popular by word of mouth.
Topics: life and society, history, technology
Regions:
Tags: museums, experience
Duration: 28'02"

10:40
Book review - The Last Painting of Sara De Vos by Dominic Smith
BODY:
Reviewed by Jenna Todd, published by Allen Unwin.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

11:10
Political commentators Stephen Mills and Rob Hosking
BODY:
How the parties are postioned midway through the electoral cycle and how important leadership styles will be going into election year.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'36"

11:37
Food: Baking with Cricket Flour
BODY:
Christopher Wilson runs Live Longer where he's baking with a sustainable form of protein - cricket flour. He'll share a recipe for Cricket Carrot Cake.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: insects, Crickets, cake, flour
Duration: 9'59"

11:47
Urbanist Tommy Honey
BODY:
While we wrestle with migrant issues here in New Zealand we should be mindful that we don't share a border with anyone and its along way to swim: effectively migration can be controlled through policy levers (should we shoose to do so). Not so in the US where they have a particularly porous border to the South and one presidential candidate who is pledging to build the largest infrastructure project since the U.S. highway system. And it makes no sense at all…
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: borders, immigration
Duration: 12'01"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 News and current affairs
09:15 Is a bumper year for tourism paying off & what are the costs?
[image:71085:half] no metadata
Since 2013 visitor arrivals to New Zealand have jumped from 2.6 million to 3.26 million in 2016. Analysis indicates these numbers will increase significantly by 2020 - potentially to 4.2 million or more. Are we ready?
David Simmons is a Tourism professor from Lincoln University, Dave Bamford is an independent tourism advisor and co-founder of TRC Tourism, and Jeroen Jongejans is a director of Northland's Dive! Tutukaka. He's been involved with the adventure tourism and outdoors industry for over 20 years.
09:30 Building Sustainable Homes
Housing in New Zealand faces many challenges - not least reversing the health impacts of low-quality homes while meeting exploding demand. How do we resolve these thorny issues to create resilient, liveable homes and communities? Andrea Reimer - a driving force behind Vancouver becoming the world's fourth greenest city comes to Auckland's Sustainable Housing Summit to share her ideas.
09:45 Europe correspondent Seamus Kearney
10:05 Museums: portals to the past, windows to the future
From pop-up exhibits to helping people get tattoos of artworks, museums are making a big effort to keep up with the digital age, but US museum guru and futurist Elizabeth Merritt says we shouldn't get too obsessed with technology.
[gallery:2086]
10:35 Book review - The Last Painting of Sara De Vos by Dominic Smith
reviewed by Jenna Todd, published by Allen Unwin
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Political commentators Stephen Mills and Rob Hosking
11:30 Food: Baking with Cricket Flour
Christopher Wilson runs Live Longer where he's baking with a sustainable form of protein - cricket flour. He'll share a recipe for Cricket Carrot Cake.
Cricket Carrot Cake
Ingredients
4 small grated carrots
1 & 1/3 cup sultanas
1 & 1/3 cup long thread coconut
2/3 cup raw walnut pieces
2/3 cup melted coconut oil
4 free-range eggs
1/2 cup & 1/3 cup xylitol (or your choice of sugar substitute)
2/3 & ½ cups gluten free baking mix
3 Tbsp Live Longer Cricket Flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon mixed spice
Method
Preheat the oven to fan bake 130C. Grease and line a large cake tin.
Mix carrot, sultanas, coconut and walnuts in a bowl.
Beat eggs and xylitol until thick and creamy (about 5 minutes) and then slowly add coconut oil.
Add the wet mixture to the sultana bowl, and sift dry ingredients until everything is combined well.
Bake for 2 hours (or until a skewer comes out clean).
Leave in tin for 30 minutes, and then transfer to a cooling rack.
When completely cool, dust with icing sugar.
[image:70958:full]

11:45 Urbanist Tommy Honey

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Florence and the Machine
Song: Ship to Wreck
Composer: Welch
Album: How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful
Label: Island
Played at: 10:40

Artist: Roseanne Cash
Song: World of Strange Design
Composer: Cash
Album: The River and the Thread
Label: Universal
Played at: 11:07

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
Hate crime or terrorism? Authorities hunt for a motive in the worst mass shooting in US history and the search continues for a missing two-year-old girl on the West Coast.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'21"

12:17
Singapore Airlines says Wellington bookings strong
BODY:
Singapore Airlines is reporting a strong takeup of its new service from Wellington to Canberra and then Singapore.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Singapore Airlines
Duration: 54"

12:18
Airwork Holdings expects a 41% increase in FY net profit
BODY:
The air freight carrier, Airwork Holdings, says its full year net profit is expected to be up by 41 percent on the year earlier, as the expansion of its fleet is almost complete.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Airwork Holdings
Duration: 48"

12:19
Fliway says FY17 will be material impacted by customer loss
BODY:
The freight transport company, Fliway Group, says next year's revenue and sales will be significantly less than expected after losing a major customer in a competitive bid.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fliway Group
Duration: 1'34"

12:20
Brierley admits defeat of Kirk's takeover
BODY:
Veteran corporate raider, Sir Ron Brierley, has admitted defeat over his company's takeover attempt of the former Wellington posh-shop, Kirkcaldie & Stains.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Kirkcaldie & Stains
Duration: 1'00"

12:21
Jim Parker in Australia
BODY:
To Australia, where debate about the property market is no less heated and protracted than the debate here.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Australiia
Duration: 1'01"

12:23
Midday Markets for 13 June 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'28"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
The resins maker, Nuplex, is urging shareholders - big and small - to be sure to vote on the billion-dollar takeover by Allnex, which is being made by way of a scheme of arrangement.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'10"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand golfer Lydia Ko is tied for the lead with a couple of holes to play in the PGA Championship in Washington.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'37"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 13 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'16"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Waiheke Island and North Rodey want to cut ties with Supercity
BODY:
Both districts have applied to the Local Government Commission to establish their own unitary authority. And now any area in Auckland, has until June 24, to apply to the commission to break away. Massey University local government expert, Andy Asquith assesses their chances
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Waiheke Island, North Rodey
Duration: 9'47"

13:25
A third of people on earth can no longer see the Milky Way
BODY:
A new study has revealed a third of people on earth can not see the milky way at night due to light pollution. An international team of scientists have created The New World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness - which shows 99 percent of those living in the United States and Europe live under light-polluted skies. Emeritus Professor of Astronomy, John Hearnshaw say this is a growing problem here, mainly due to the way we light our streets.
EXTENDED BODY:
A new study has revealed a third of people on Earth can't see the Milky Way at night, due to light pollution.
An international team of scientists has created The New World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness - which shows 99 percent of those living in the United States and Europe live under light-polluted skies
University of Canterbury Emeritus Professor of Astronomy John Hearnshaw says this is a growing problem in New Zealand as well, mainly due to the way we light our streets.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: light pollution
Duration: 10'59"

13:39
Reviewing the country's public toilets
BODY:
If you're heading to a restaurant it's probably second nature for you to go online and read a couple of reviews. Likewise most of us will find out what the critics think before spending money on a movie. But have you ever considered reading a review of a toilet before you use it? You might be able thanks to the team behind Bog Standard Toilet News, a group of New Zealanders committed to improving our facilities. The group are anonymous but we've managed to obtain an interview with a representative we're calling "Deep Flush".
EXTENDED BODY:
If you're heading to a restaurant it's probably second nature for you to go online and read a couple of reviews.
Likewise most of us will find out what the critics think before spending money on a movie.
But have you ever considered reading a review of a toilet before you use it?
You might be able thanks to the team behind Bog Standard Toilet News – a group of New Zealanders committed to improving our facilities.
The group are anonymous, but Jesse Mulligan managed to obtain an interview with a representative we're calling 'Deep Flush'.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: public toilets
Duration: 7'31"

13:44
Favourite album
BODY:
London Calling, by The Clash
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'20"

14:10
Television Critic Alex Casey
BODY:
Reviewing 'Westside'. 'Why Am I?' and 'UnREAL'.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: television
Duration: 10'14"

14:24
A bug's life: sex and fighting
BODY:
Leilani Walker is a Doctoral student at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, where she researchers bug and spider behaviour. She'll give listeners a bug quiz, and answer questions about sexual cannabilism, why males bugs fight and why bigger isn't always better when it comes to winning a mate.
EXTENDED BODY:
Bug behaviour expert Leilani Walker answers questions about sexual cannabilism, why males bugs fight and why bigger isn't always better when it comes to winning a mate.
Leilani Walker is a doctoral student at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, where she researches bug and spider behaviour.
Quiz
Q: When a male spider enters a female's web, how does he stop her from immediately eating him?
A: He drums on the web in a specific way to let her know that he's of the same species.
Q: Why do male mantises and moths have such large antennae?
A: To help them find females in the dark.
Q: According to the Endangered species foundation, what are two of our most endangered New Zealand species after the Maui's dolphin?
A: The Canterbury knobbled weevil and the Mokohinau stag beetle.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: spiders
Duration: 36'07"

15:07
Clint Hill: Protecting Presidents
BODY:
Clint Hill was the secret service agent charged with protecting Jackie Kennedy, and was there on that fateful day her husband, President John F Kennedy was assasinated in Dallas. He details his 17 years protecting the most powerful people in the world in his book Five Presidents: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon and Ford. Clint Hill talks to Jesse Mulligan about his work during that tumultuous era.
EXTENDED BODY:
Clint Hill was the secret service agent charged with protecting Jackie Kennedy, and was there on that fateful day her husband, President John F Kennedy was assasinated in Dallas.
He details his 17 years protecting the most powerful people in the world in his book Five Presidents: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon and Ford.
Clint explains what he saw on the day President Kennedy was assasinated:
"We were travelling in the motorcade and we were travelling down Elm st. in Dallas and we went by a building called the Texas School Book Depository.
I was in a left-hand car, the car immediately behind the Presidential vehicle and I was in the forward position on the left-hand side and I was scanning an area to my left that was a grassy area. There were some people there, not a great number and I was also scanning an area called a triple underpass. We had to go underneath a railroad bridge to get to a highway.
All of a sudden I heard an explosive noise over my right shoulder.
I did not immediately recognise it as a gunshot. I thought at first it might have been a fire cracker. I started to turn toward the noise and in so doing my eyes passed the back of the Presidential vehicle, which was immediately in front of us, and I saw the President’s reaction.
I saw him grab at his throat and he started to fall to his left, I realised that it had to have been a gunshot and I jumped from my position in the car and ran towards the Presidential vehicle in an attempt to get on top of the back of the car to form a shield there, to protect both the President and Mrs Kennedy, but just before I got to the presidential car, the third shot rang out.
That shot hit the president in the head. President Kennedy then started to fall to his left. I got up on the back of the car, and Mrs Kennedy came out of her seat, up onto the trunk. She was trying to retrieve some of the material that had erupted out of the president’s head from the gunshot wound and then I grabbed a hold of her and put her in the back seat again and when I did that, the president’s body fell farther to its left and his head was in her lap and the right side of his face was up, I could see that his eyes were fixed.
There was a hole in the skull and I could see that most of the brain area had gone from that area. I assumed that there was a fatal wound.
I turned and gave a thumbs down to the follow up car to indicate that this was a very devastating situation we were in and I screamed at the driver to get us to the hospital."
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: Clint Hill
Duration: 27'38"

15:30
African Youth Speak Out
BODY:
A report on encounters between African youth and police in Auckland sought to highlight bias in the justice system. But negative backlash from the public in social media after its release has shocked many of the youth.
EXTENDED BODY:
A report on encounters between African youth and police in Auckland sought to highlight bias in the justice system. But negative backlash from the public in social media after its release has shocked many of the youth who feel the police have dismissed their claims. Lynda Chanwai-Earle took a closer look.
In a small Mt Roskill recording studio Mahad Yusef, aka rapper Syco Yusef, performs his song Contemplating. The lyrics paint a picture of a conflicted young man choosing his path in life.
I’m just contemplatin’, yeah my mind be racing, losing concentration, man I must be patient.

“I wrote this song when I was in a place in life where I wanted to do a lot of bad things but I knew the outcome of those bad things,” he says. “It’s a song that got me through that time and pushed me on to be the person I am today.”
Mahad, 21, is a local of Mt Roskill and dreams of becoming a counsellor helping youth in his neighbourhood.
“A lot of young teenagers in our neighbourhood are on home detention, bracelets, my friends are in jail...all for misunderstandings, all for little things” says Mahad.
“All for things that could have been dealt with in the community, without police -” Mushtaq,18, and Koolay, 16, agree.
“Who deserves to be 21 and in prison you know?” Mahad adds.
“It’s pretty annoying to be stopped by a police officer just for walking on the road based on how you’re dressed...to see if we have bail conditions, because we’re black.”
African youth are the fastest growing minority population in Auckland and make-up the largest percentage of their community. In the 2013 census 13,464 people identified with an African ethnic group, the majority of which live in Auckland.
The African Youth Forum research report released in February, 2016, deployed a mixed methods research approach containing both qualitative and quantitative methods by the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) featuring 84 respondents and interviews with 32 young Africans aged 16 to 31.
Participants said they'd been racially profiled, harassed and, in some instances, beaten by police.
Mahad is one of those who was interviewed. His family fled civil war in Mogadishu, Somalia, in 1996 when he was 10 months old moving to New Zealand for a better life.
“I’m pure Kiwi, Kiwi-pride!” he says, “New Zealand is my home. It’s done so much for me, gave me an education, a stable home. When I came from Africa I had nothing... She (my mother) raised us on her own. My whole life I’ve been on a mission to make my mother proud.”
But he has had some run-ins with the police.
“Physical violence, fighting,” he says. “I don’t mean to be racist but if I got into a fight with a white kid - I’d be the one copping it harder.”
Mahad says he was left to bleed in a police cell overnight after a tooth was knocked out by a security guard in a scuffle. His gap-tooth grin is the legacy of this experience.
“The thing that really bothers me is that they make it seem like New Zealand is such a peaceful country and there is no such thing as racism, no such thing as police prejudice, abuse, but there is. It’s real, it’s happening.”
The aim of the report was to highlight issues youth were experiencing and create dialogue with the police. However the negative responses from both the police and public after its release have left the youth who participated were left feeling even more stigmatised.
“If a group of police are targeting our youth it reverberates into the community and into society and the last thing we want is to marginalise this group of people,” principal author of the report Dr Camille Nakhid says.
“Seventy five percent of our African youth have university degree qualifications and above. At the moment we can reach the youth. We don’t want to push them so far away that it’s hard to get to them.”
Members of the African Youth Forum (AYF) and one of the researchers met at the Wesley Community Centre in Mt Roskill to discuss the negative backlash they experienced after the report’s release. Fatumah Bah, Nunu, and Ali all insist they felt targeted because of their ethnicity.
“I think it’s about colour.” says Nunu, as a young Muslim woman says she’s felt singled out by front-line police when she and her friends are simply enjoying an evening out in public. “How would you feel safe about going back to the police and saying - the police did this to me?”
Twenty two-year-old Ali agrees. As a Tunisian African with a fair complexion he notices how his dark-skinned friends are questioned when he is not. "I'm a white African and proud of my colour, but when we're on Queen Street and get stopped by police I've noticed I get treated differently than Nunu, I get treated so differently, it's not subtle, you feel it."
“The whole point of the research report was to start the discussion,” says Researcher Mohamud Mohamed, “The report aimed to address issues and then move forward. It was solution based. Moreover the police were invited to participate in the research and on the panel discussion [at the report’s launch]. It was not meant as a finger pointing exercise.”
“When you look at people in authority condemning what the youth have said, you’ve just made it very unsafe for them,” Dr Nakhid says. “They came forward - they gave their stories and then these same people said these claims are unsubstantiated. How unsafe is this for them?”
It’s a catch-22 situation.
The police can’t investigate without a complaint, but the report’s participants do not trust the police to investigate themselves.
The deputy chief executive of Maori, Pacific and ethnic services, Superintendent Wally Haumaha says everyone has the right to raise issues of safety and it’s important that ethnic communities trust the police.
“If these youth have legitimate claims then I would expect they come directly to the police. If evidence was given we would look further into these allegations. Hence why I [regard] these allegations as unsubstantiated.”
“I have every confidence that the [Independent Police Conduct] Authority sets out to do the right thing. Nobody in the New Zealand Police deliberately goes out to commit any form of abuse. We now have 70 to 100 Ethnic Liaison Officers working across the country, the voice of the communities is reflected through them."
He also defends policing generally saying that the police do not target people based on the colour of their skin and he detests the term racial profiling.
But Fatumata Bah from the AYF counters this, "When we dismiss "racial profiling" which is defined as the use of race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of having committed an offence, we know we have an issue."
The ethnic liaison officers illustrate a way forward for both sides of this conflict developing relationships within the communities that allow bridges of trust to develop.
“I’ve only come across one cop that I like.” Mahad says emphatically. "Constable Rob Stanton. He’s the only one I trust.”
Before working in Mt Roskill, Ethnic Liaison Officer Constable Rob Stanton did two stints of volunteer work in Africa, taught English in Korea and travelled widely throughout China and Southeast Asia.
“If you come from a former-refugee background you might have reason to be fearful of police. Some of these youth have come from countries in Africa where if you complain about police you will go missing and that’s no exaggeration.”
Hear more about Rob here in A Most Diverse Beat
Members of the Somali community who participated in the report also note the experiences of former refugees might colour their perceptions of police.
“Our youth are not bad kids, you have civil wars and your psyche changes for a lot of things you’ve witnessed.” says Kenadid Siyad.
“Over in Africa our police officers have guns and AK-47’s.You will respect him because you will fear him. In the Middle East there are certain special forces that are allowed to shoot you on sight. So when you compare him to a Kiwi police officer with no gun, coming out with his little notebook - what a joke!”
Mohamed Geele felt some aspects were exaggerated.
“If you’ve come from a country where it’s shoot first and ask questions later then you don’t want to complain about police,” Mohamed Geele says.
“Here it’s assume first and ask questions later. We just got to work on the assumption part.”

Topics: identity, inequality
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: youth, police, crime, justice, African New Zealanders, racial profiling, culture, faith, community.
Duration: 30'07"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 13 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'25"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Waiheke Island and North Rodey want to cut ties with Supercity
Both districts have applied to the Local Government Commission to establish their own unitary authority.
And now any area in Auckland, has until June 24, to apply to the commission to break away.
Massey University local government expert, Andy Asquith assesses their chances
1:20 A third of people on earth can no longer see the Milky Way
A new study has revealed a third of people on earth can not see the milky way at night due to light pollution.
An international team of scientists have created The New World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness - which shows 99 percent of those living in the United States and Europe live under light-polluted skies
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Emeritus Professor of Astronomy, John Hearnshaw say this is a growing problem here, mainly due to the way we light our streets.
1:30 Reviewing the country's public toilets
If you're heading to a restaurant it's probably second nature for you to go online and read a couple of reviews.
Likewise most of us will find out what the critics think before spending money on a movie.
But have you ever considered reading a review of a toilet before you use it?
You might be able thanks to the team behind Bog Standard Toilet News, a group of New Zealanders committed to improving our facilities.
The group are anonymous but we've managed to obtain an interview with a representative we're calling "Deep Flush".
[gallery:2126]
1:40 Favourite album: London Calling, by The Clash
2:10 Television Critic Alex Casey
2:20 A Bug's Life: Sex and Fighting
Leilani Walker is a Doctoral student at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, where she researchers bug and spider behaviour.
[gallery:2127]
She'll give listeners a bug quiz, and answer questions about sexual cannabilism, why males bugs fight and why bigger isn't always better when it comes to winning a mate.
[embed] https://youtu.be/dsMUDFJ6pMU
[image:70924:half]
3:10 Clint Hill:protecting presidents
Clint Hill was the secret service agent charged with protecting Jackie Kennedy, and was there on that fateful day her husband, President John F Kennedy was assasinated in Dallas
He details his 17 years protecting the most powerful people in the world in his book Five Presidents: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon and Ford.
Clint Hill talks to Jesse Mulligan about his work during that tumultuous era.
3:35 Voices
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1- 4pm
Monday 13th June
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Andrew White
TITLE: Climbing Stars
COMP: Andrew White
ALBUM: Beautiful Trouble (Unreleased)
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: The Clash
TITLE: London Calling
COMP: Joe Strummer, Mick Jones
ALBUM: London Calling
LABEL: Epic
ARTIST: The Clash
TITLE: Revolution Rock
COMP: Jackie Edwards, Danny Ray
ALBUM: London Calling
LABEL: Epic
ARTIST: The Clash
TITLE: The Guns of Brixton
COMP: Paul Simonon
ALBUM: London Calling
LABEL: Epic
ADDITIONAL MUSIC:
ARTIST: The Last Shadow Puppets
TITLE: My Mistakes Were Made For You
COMP: Alex Turner, Miles Kane
ALBUM: The Age of the Understatement
LABEL: Domino
PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Grammaropolis
TITLE: Best Noun Song ever
COMP: Grammaropolis
ALBUM: The School Rocks
LABEL: Download

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 13 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'25"

16:03
The Panel with Stephen Franks and Chris Gallavin (Part 1)
BODY:
.What the Stephen Franks and Chris Gallavin have been up to. .The terrible slaughter at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando. The gunman, who was Moslem, had pledged allegiance to ISIS, possibly just invoking the name; it's not known for sure. .Increasingly younger victims, with resulting low self-esteem and depression. Now celebrities are going public with their own bullying stories.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'43"

16:05
The Panel with Stephen Franks and Chris Gallavin (Part 2)
BODY:
There are questions to be asked about why the "internet" is no longer considered a noun and commonly written with out a capital "I". What Stephen Franks and Chris Gallavin have been thinking about. .There's a new website, New Zealand Asks God. It's the initiative of the Greenlane Christian Centre. Anyone can ask a question of God. The most popular will be answered by a theologically-trained team, who presumably know what is in the mind of the Almighty. Raising the age of adult criminal responsibility and over representation of Maori in the system.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'38"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Stephen Franks and Chris Gallavin have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'58"

16:09
Slaughter at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando
BODY:
The terrible slaughter at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando. The gunman, who was Moslem, had pledged allegiance to ISIS, possibly just invoking the name; it's not known for sure.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, terrorism, mass murder
Duration: 17'41"

16:27
Rise in cyberbullying
BODY:
Increasingly younger victims, with resulting low self-esteem and depression. Now celebrities are going public with their own bullying stories.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: cyberbullying
Duration: 3'37"

16:32
The internet is no longer a noun in the English language
BODY:
There are questions to be asked about why the "internet" is no longer considered a noun and commonly written with out a capital "I".
Topics: language
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'07"

16:37
Panel Says
BODY:
What Stephen Franks and Chris Gallavin have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'37"

16:49
Rev Dr Helen Jacobi
BODY:
There's a new website, New Zealand Asks God. It's the initiative of the Greenlane Christian Centre. Anyone can ask a question of God. The most popular will be answered by a theologically-trained team, who presumably know what is in the mind of the Almighty.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: God, New Zealand Asks God
Duration: 5'06"

16:54
Age of adult criminal responsibility
BODY:
Raising the age of adult criminal responsibility and over representation of Maori in the system.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Monday 13 June 2016
BODY:
Watch Monday's full programme here. It begins five minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
50 dead in Orlando massacre
BODY:
After gunman Omar Mateen opened fire in a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, over 50 people are dead and many more injured.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 9'09"

17:17
Orlando death toll could rise with 53 injured
BODY:
The mass shooting in Orlando has the greatest casualties of any in American history. Correspondent Nick Harper joins Checkpoint.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 6'35"

17:24
John Key gives condolences following shooting
BODY:
The Prime Minister has expressed his condolences on behalf of New Zealand to the United States in the wake of last night's massacre in Orlando. .
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 45"

17:25
Refugee quote to go up to 1000 from 2018
BODY:
For the first time since 1997, New Zealand's refugee quota will be increased from 750 to 1000, starting in 2018.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'55"

17:28
Teenage attacker used wrestling move on Stephen Dudley
BODY:
An inquest into a teenager who died after being punched has described how his attacker used a clothesline wrestling move on him before he fell.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Stephen Dudley
Duration: 3'14"

17:34
Evening Business for 13 June 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'53"

17:36
RCEP economic benefits criticised
BODY:
The government is rejecting claims from critics that a proposed Asian-focused trade pact, the RCEP, would have minimal economic benefits.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: RCEP, trade
Duration: 3'39"

17:40
Lydia Ko outplayed by youngster at third major
BODY:
Golf's number one, Lydia Ko, has been beaten by an even younger woman in a sudden-death playoff at the Women's PGA championship in Washington.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Lydia Ko, golf
Duration: 5'01"

17:44
Fears about water supply contamination in Canterbury
BODY:
Canterbury residents are worried their drinking water could be contaminated if an application by ten quarries to dig even deeper is granted.
Topics: environment
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Drinking Water
Duration: 3'06"

17:48
Pulse nightclub regulars say it was a safe place
BODY:
Pulse, the nightclub, where 50 people were murdered overnight, is an institution in Florida. Its owner, Barbara Poma, released a statement saying she was "devastated about the horrific events that have taken place today.' .
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 4'10"

17:52
Orlando still in shock after shooting
BODY:
Ray Caputo is a reporter and news anchor for WDBO, in Orlando. .
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 2'36"

17:55
NZ mechanic first woman to head V8 pit crew
BODY:
New Zealand mechanic Frances Buckley will become the first woman to head-up a pit lane crew in the Australasian V8 Supercar competition this weekend.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Frances Buckley
Duration: 3'57"

18:08
Omar Mateen shot more than one-hundred patrons
BODY:
The ex-wife of the gunman who killed at least 50 people in a Florida nightclub, has spoken of the abuse she suffered at the hands of her former partner. .
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 6'38"

18:15
Pulse - loved and celebrated by the LGBT community
BODY:
Equality Florida is an advocacy and support group for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community in the State. Amongst its immediate responses has been to launch a fundraising campaign on the GoFundMe site. .
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, omar mateen, masacre, Florida, terrorism
Duration: 5'47"

18:21
Catholic church loosing New Zealand-born church go-ers.
BODY:
The Catholic Church is struggling to attract and keep New Zealand-born worshippers, with fewer than ever going to church.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'00"

18:24
A Dunedin Gymnastics Academy writes off 100k of equipment
BODY:
A Dunedin Gymnastics Academy will have to write off more than $100,000 worth of equipment after health and safety tests last week revealed traces of asbestos on the rafters and window sills.
Topics: sport
Regions: Otago
Tags: Gymnastics Academy
Duration: 4'04"

18:28
One man dead, another overboard in the Pacific
BODY:
One man is dead and another has been lost at sea after strong winds damaged the rigging on a yacht about 550-kilometres north of New Zealand.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: yacht, rescue
Duration: 1'45"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:10
Snapping at all stations
BODY:
David Brewer has photographed every train station in Great Britain, all 2500 of them. He also has a fondness for the small and least used ones.
Topics: arts, transport
Regions:
Tags: photography, trains, trainspotting
Duration: 21'43"

20:10
Nights' Science - Computer Science
BODY:
Prof. Mark Apperley from the University of Waikato shares examples of how science fiction sometimes becomes science fact.
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: science fiction
Duration: 20'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Snapping at all stations
David Brewer has photographed every train station in Great Britain, all 2500 of them. He also has a fondness for the small and least used ones.
[gallery:2130]
7:35 Upbeat
A feature interview encore from RNZ Concert. Tonight, jazz guitarist Larry Koonse chats to Eva Radich during his visit to New Zealand for the Wellington Jazz Festival.
[image:71297:half] no metadata
8:12 Nights' Science - Computer Science
Prof. Mark Apperley from the University of Waikato shares examples of how science fiction sometimes becomes science fact.
8:30 Window on the World
Turnaround - How do you set a losing company back on the right track? Matthew Gwyther of the BBC 'Global Business' team speaks to leaders who've turned around businesses in financial difficulty and finds out how they did it, what inspired them and what lessons they can pass on.
9:20 ROTN
Will it be Right on the Night? Join us for the first episode of RNZ's experimental instant serial. This week we travel back to the Neolithic era...

9:30 Insight
Eric Frykberg heads to Leipzig, in Germany, to find out how technology might be able to help people maintain their current way of life, without damaging the environment.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 Folk Alley
New music from Willie Sugarcapps, Kaia Kater, Chaim Tannenbaum, Loudon Wainwright III, Leyla McCalla, Evie Ladin Band; plus a set featuring Canadian songwriter David Francey's latest album, 'Empty Train'; we'll experience some grace with Fairport Convention and Kasey Chambers; plus favorites from Harry Manx & Kevin Breit, Crooked Still, Martin & Eliza Carthy, and more.

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

Monday 13 June – Turnaround
How do you set a losing company back on the right track? Matthew Gwyther of the BBC 'Global Business' team speaks to leaders who've turned around businesses in financial difficulty and finds out how they did it, what inspired them and what lessons they can pass on.
Tuesday 14 June – Bones (2 of 2)
Since the early 1980’s, a ground-breaking Argentine forensics team known as the EAAF, has advised and taught other teams working across Latin America, to unearth the bones that provide clues to South America's 'disappeared'. Our ‘Window on the World' feature tonight follows them to Colombia and the search for victims of the country's 50-year-long armed conflict. We also hear the voices of families looking for missing young students in Mexico.
Wednesday 15 June – Deobandis (2 of 2)
The BBC's former Pakistan correspondent Owen Bennett Jones continues his exploration of South Asia’s Deobandi Muslim movement. He heads across the border to Pakistan, where Deobandi ideology has provided spiritual guidance for both militant groups like the Taliban and a strictly non-violent missionary movement. So how can a single school of thought follow such different paths?
Thursday 16 June Bangladesh Shame
Lipika Pelham travels to a remote part of south eastern Bangladesh to report on claims of human rights abuses against indigenous inhabitants of the area. The Chittagong Hill Tracts are home to thirteen indigenous groups with the Chakma, Marma, Chak and Mro mostly practising Theravada Buddhism. Thousands were forced off their lands from the 1960s until the 1990s. An insurgency that started in the mid 1970s ended in a peace settlement in 1997 under which the army was supposed to withdraw but it continues to maintain a tight grip on the area. The resettlement of tens of thousands of Bengalis from other parts of the country has only added to tensions.

===9:30 PM. | Insight===
=DESCRIPTION=

An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Elena See presents a selection of traditional and contemporary folk, Americana and roots music from classic and new releases, as well as in-studio and live concert recordings. (PRX)