RNZ National. 2016-07-07. 00:00-23:59.

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Year
2016
Reference
288271
Media type
Audio
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Rights Information
Year
2016
Reference
288271
Media type
Audio
Item unavailable online
Series
Radio New Zealand National. 2015--. 00:00-23:59.
Categories
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings
Untelescoped radio airchecks
Duration
24:00:00
Credits
RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

07 July 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight;
12:30 Discovery (BBC);
1:05 Sam Hunt at 70 (RNZ);
2:05 The Cultural Frontline
3:05 The Conductor by Sarah Quigley read by Peter Bland (2 of 15, RNZ);
3:30 NZ Books: The Last Time We Spoke by Fiona Sussman (RNZ)
5:10 Witness (BBC);
5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 7 July 2016
BODY:
A seven-year British inquiry into the Iraq war has delivered a crushing assessment of Britain's role in the US-led invasion in 2003. the BBC's Security Correspondent, Frank Gardner, has been reading the Chilcot report. Thirty years on from homosexual law reform the Green MP Kevin Hague has presented a petition to Parliament calling for an official apology to the men who were punished under the pre-1986 regime. He also wants their convictions overturned. Political reporter Benedict Collins reports.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 33'37"

06:08
Sports News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ sport
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'07"

06:14
Auckland transport plans don't consider emissions, say Greens
BODY:
Big plans for Auckland's future roads and public transport projects are under fire from the Greens for not giving top priority to reducing the city's greenhouse gas emissions. Our reporter Michael Cropp investigates.
Topics: transport, politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Green Party, emissions
Duration: 2'56"

06:17
30th anniversay of homosexual law reform marked at Parliament
BODY:
Gay men convicted of homosexuality may be pardoned as the Government considers acknowledging the wrongs of the past. And on the 30th anniversary of homosexual law reform Labour's Grant Robertson remembers growing up during the debate.
Topics: law, history, life and society
Regions:
Tags: homosexuality, law
Duration: 2'52"

06:20
Early Business News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'14"

06:24
Morning Rural News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'11"

06:37
Chilcot inquiry leaves door open to prosecutions over Iraq war
BODY:
One of Britain's best-known commentators on the law Joshua Rozenberg talks to us about the Chilcot reoprt. He says the inquiry is highly critical of Tony Blair and relatives of the victims are now exploring their legal options.
Topics: politics, conflict
Regions:
Tags: Chilcot report, UK, Iraq
Duration: 4'17"

06:43
Surfer Mick Fanning back in water in same spot as shark attack
BODY:
Australian surfer Mick Fanning has gone back into the water today in the exact spot a shark nearly took his life last year.The South African Broadcasting Corporation's Janine Lee was at the scene in Jeffery's Bay last year and like Mick is back there again.
Topics: sport, life and society
Regions:
Tags: surfing, sharks
Duration: 3'08"

06:51
Mike Greer plans to build 1,500 houses a year in Auckland
BODY:
A big Canterbury-based house builder has teamed up a private investment firm to take advantage of the booming residential property market in the upper North Island.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: construction, Mike Greer Homes
Duration: 1'53"

06:52
Sky TV shareholders approve proposed merger with Vodafone
BODY:
The head of Sky Television says the company isn't revising its guidance for the coming financial year, as customer numbers have picked up again.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Sky TV
Duration: 2'09"

06:55
New Casino for Australia
BODY:
Over the Tasman now, and the bright-lights of Sydney are about to get a little brighter.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Casino
Duration: 53"

06:57
Morning Markets for 7 July 2016
BODY:
Global markets are continuing to feel the jitters.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'01"

06:58
Business briefs
BODY:
The Financial Markets Authority and the Serious Fraud Office say they are investigating a Paul Clifford Hibbs and his company Hansa Limited.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'39"

07:07
Sports News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'31"

07:16
Seven-year British inquiry into Iraq invasion released
BODY:
A seven-year British inquiry into the Iraq war has delivered a crushing assessment of Britain's role in the US-led invasion in 2003. the BBC's Security Correspondent, Frank Gardner, has been reading the Chilcot report.
Topics: politics, conflict
Regions:
Tags: Chilcot report, UK, Iraq
Duration: 5'28"

07:21
Government to consider pardons for gay men
BODY:
Thirty years on from homosexual law reform the Green MP Kevin Hague has presented a petition to Parliament calling for an official apology to the men who were punished under the pre-1986 regime. He also wants their convictions overturned. Political reporter Benedict Collins reports.
Topics: law, life and society
Regions:
Tags: homosexuality, Pardons
Duration: 4'12"

07:26
Moko's mum hears of killer's 109 convictions via media
BODY:
The mother of Moko Rangitoheriri first heard of the more than one hundred criminal convictions amassed by his killer through the media yesterday. We talk to the lawyer for Moko's mother Nicola Dally-Paki.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: convictions
Duration: 6'29"

07:36
Dame Tariana Turia backs Tikanga Maori in prisons
BODY:
The Corrections Minister Judith Collins has laid into a Maori-focused prison rehabilitation programme. We talk to former Maori Party co-leader Dame Tariana Turia. She says the comments highlight Ms Collins' lack of respect for tikanga Maori.
Topics: crime, life and society
Regions:
Tags: rehabilitation, prison, tikanga Maori
Duration: 6'04"

07:43
Judge sentences Pistorius to six years in prison
BODY:
The South African Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius has been sentenced to six years in prison for the murder of Reeva Steenkamp The Telegraph's Africa correspondent, Aislinn Laing, has the details
Topics: crime, sport
Regions:
Tags: murder, Sentence
Duration: 2'26"

07:45
Fate of Redcliffs School decided today
BODY:
The Redcliffs School community is nervously awaiting a decision today about whether it will remain open or not. We talk to a Redcliffs School board trustee, Mark Robberds.
Topics: education, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Redcliffs school
Duration: 3'27"

07:48
Mihingarangi Forbes answers questions on Te Reo Maori
BODY:
It's Thursday today and Guyon is joined again by Mihingarangi Forbes for Te Wiki o te reo Maori.
Topics: te ao Maori, language
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'53"

07:54
Local groups wary of DHB plans to sell prime Auckland land
BODY:
Local groups in south Auckland are wary of a district health board proposal to sell nearly 11 hectares 10.85 of prime land back to the Government for a possible housing development. Nick Smith says the land could have space for up to 250 new houses. Kate Newton reports.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'39"

07:58
Police operation in Auckland targets dangerous driving
BODY:
Police are out in force in Auckland this morning cracking down on dangerous driving. The officer in charge of the operation gives us more details.
Topics: transport, life and society
Regions:
Tags: dangerous driving
Duration: 2'06"

08:07
Sports News for July 7 2016
BODY:
An update form the team at RNZ sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'49"

08:12
British army officer says Chilcot report outlines many failings
BODY:
A British officer who was on the front lines in Iraq says the Chilcot report is very candid and outlines the many failings of those behind the decision to go to war. We review the inquiry with Colonel Tim Collins.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, Chilcot report, Iraq
Duration: 5'25"

08:18
Petition calls for an official apology to gay men
BODY:
The Government will consider overturning hundreds of convictions handed down to gay men for consensual sex. the former Labour Cabinet Minister Fran Wilde, who introduced the Homosexual Law Reform Bill, says
Topics: law, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Homosexuality Law
Duration: 4'40"

08:23
Wellington police investigating attempted abduction
BODY:
Primary schools in Wellington's western suburbs have warned parents of three men behaving suspiciously towards children - including a recent attempted abduction. Our reporter Emile Donovan reports.
Topics: crime, education
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: schools, kidnapping
Duration: 2'46"

08:26
RBNZ to speak on measures to cool red hot housing market
BODY:
House prices are on a tear. The Reserve Bank's deputy governor Grant Spencer will speak this evening about measures to cool the market. Our economics correspondent, Patrick O'Meara looks at his options.
Topics: economy, housing
Regions:
Tags: house prices
Duration: 3'00"

08:29
Markets Update for 7 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'07"

08:36
Chilcot Harvey
BODY:
The inquiry into the Iraq war has also left the door open for former UK prime minister Tony Blair to be prosecuted. The Chilcot inquiry has delivered a damning verdict on the decision by Tony Blair to commit British troops to the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. Families of the British soldiers who died in Iraq have expressed their anger with Mr Blair and are exploring their legal options. Theresa Evans' son Lance Bombardier Llewelyn Evans was the first Welsh soldier to be killed in Iraq. Reaction to the report has been somewhat muted in Iraq but in the US, former president George Bush has defended the decision to invade Iraq. A retired US colonel and a senior fellow at the Global Initiative for Civil Society and Conflict , Derek Harvey, served in Iraq on a number of tours.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'16"

08:40
Court Martial
BODY:
An army instructor accused of hitting recruits' testicles and making rape threats during training will learn his fate today. Staff Sergeant Glen Edward Roberts is on trial before a court martial at Linton Army Camp, he has pleaded not guilty to 13 charges of ill treatment of a person of lower rank, assault and committing an act likely to prejudice service discipline.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'49"

08:43
MTS Council
BODY:
Members of Maori Television's Elders' Council feel sidelined and left out by the station's senior executives. A member of the Council, Huata Holmes says the group used to meet the executives to discuss important issues, including language and identity, but he hasn't been contacted for two years. Another member of the kaunihera kaumatua told RNZ he was approched by two members of the executive to meet earlier this year. He says he was concerned it was just him at the meeting and questioned why they weren't meeting with the entire council. He said it felt secretive and has concerns about the future of the elders council at Maori TV.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

08:52
Pacific feels the strain of increased demand for kava
BODY:
Increased demand, severe drought and the impact of Cyclone Winston are being blammed for a shortage of kava in the Pacific and beyond.
Topics: Pacific, environment
Regions:
Tags: kava
Duration: 3'22"

08:55
Murray, Federer through to semi-finals at Wimbledon
BODY:
Andy Murray and Roger Federer are through to the Wimbledon semi-finals. we head courtside to talk to our tennis correspondent, Dave Luddy.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Wimbledon, tennis
Duration: 2'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: My Father's Ears by Karen Goa, read by Michelle Amas (9 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:10
Clare Short on Blair: "He misled people, there's no question"
BODY:
The long-awaited inquiry into the UK's role in the invasion and occupation of Iraq paints a damning picture of the innermost workings of the British government. Sir John Chilcot says that the former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair and his government went to war against Saddam Hussain before peaceful options were exhausted. He says Mr Blair overstated the threat posed by Saddam Hussein, and relied on flawed intelligence and unsatisfactory legal advice. The former Labour MP and cabinet minister Clare Short who finally resigned in protest, tells Kathryn Ryan, there's no doubt in her mind that Tony Blair misled the cabinet, parliament and the British people.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK politics, invasion of Iraq
Duration: 15'59"

09:20
The state of Te Reo
BODY:
Currently in New Zealand there are about 48 thousand people fluent in Te Reo and the figure is falling steadily. Rawinia Higgins is at the forefront of efforts to preserve Te Reo as a living language. She's just taken up the role of deputy vice chancellor for Maori studies at Victoria University and had previously chaired a review of the government's Maori language bill.
Topics: te ao Maori, education, life and society
Regions:
Tags: te reo, education
Duration: 11'24"

09:25
Healthy Star Ratings - 'not perfect but the best we've got'
BODY:
Winsome Parnell is a dietician and a member of the advisory committee to MPI on Health Star ratings. She says despite some flaws the five scale front-of-pack labels are helping consumers make healthier choices while encouraging the industry to produce foods that are lower in saturated fat, sugar or salt.
Topics: food, health
Regions:
Tags: health star ratings, sugar, health, obesity
Duration: 15'52"

09:50
UK correspondent Jon Dennis
BODY:
Jon Dennis on the Chilcot report about Britain's involvement in the Iraq war and the latest action in UK politics post the Brexit referendum
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK politics, Chilcot report, Brexit, Tony Blair
Duration: 7'41"

10:10
Danielle Cormack: success on screen and stage
BODY:
New Zealand actress Danielle Cormack has forged a hugely succesful career on screen and stage, largely in Australia in recent years. She's about to return to TV here in season 4 of the acclaimed Australian prison drama Wentworth - where she plays Bea Smith, the prison's top dog. She's also been in Rake, Underbelly: Razor, as well as numerous films, and continues to perform on stage for the Melbourne Theatre Company and Sydney Theatre Company, among others. Last year she won a Logie award for most outstanding actress and most outstanding performace by a female actress at the Australian Subscription Television Industry awards.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand actress Danielle Cormack has forged a hugely succesful career on screen and stage, largely in Australia in recent years. She's about to return to TV here in season 4 of the acclaimed Australian prison drama Wentworth - where she plays Bea Smith, the prison's top dog.
She's also been in Rake, Underbelly: Razor, as well as numerous films, and continues to perform on stage for the Melbourne Theatre Company and Sydney Theatre Company, among others.
Last year she won a Logie award for most outstanding actress and most outstanding performace by a female actress at the Australian Subscription Television Industry awards.
Read an edited excerpt of their interview below:
You’ve been very affected by playing this role on Wentworth haven’t you? You’ve got involved with organisations working with young people in the fringes of the justice system or whose parents are in prison. Are you surprised how much the research for, and then playing this role got a grip on you?
I think more than anything it was a joy to have my perspective broadened. To understand that not everyone who ends up a part of the criminal justice system is a really bad bugger. There’s been a series of events and the circumstances surrounding primarily their childhood has had a really strong impact and defined the choices that they make as adults. Just to be a little bit more compassionate about that.
Of course that is not for everyone, there are some people who stand outside of that and they are beyond help, but there are some others, especially part of the youth justice system, that you can really hopefully capture these young minds and hearts before they continue along that path and help redirect them to make choices for their lives that are going to be better in the long run.
The brain and the nervous system can fail to distinguish between reality and fantasy. When you got so involved in this character, were you finding yourself with a lasting stress from it?
I was, that’s exactly it. It took me a while to really be truly cognitive about what was going on between my body and my brain. And to understand, once again, to look at neural pathways that were being formed and when I had to act a scene of utter grief or act in an incredibly violent scene, that in actual fact my body could not distinguish between whether it was true or not. It was registering as I was actually having that experience, and it took me a while to realise that I was being affected by the experience of shooting Wentworth, so I had to do something about that and I went and spoke to someone and found that I had to warm down at the end of the day.
Actors are told to warm up all of the time, but there’s not a lot of weight even in training to warm down from playing a role. At the end of every day I would have to debrief with myself and find my own body again. Just to leave the characters at the door.
You can never lose a sense of anticipation as a performer, either. Because otherwise you’re not going to draw the performance out of yourself. It’s something you literally do have to live with.
Well you live with it, but you also learn how to manage it and use what’s going on. The chemistry of your body and the energy of that and use it to move forward and enhance the performance, rather than restrict you. If you understand the chemistry of the body, the minute we get hit with that cortisol and adrenaline it shuts down everything apart from the parts of us that need to survive, and that’s what it’s about survival. Being an actor is all about survival!
What is it that drives this in you? When I look back over your career, the body of work is extraordinary, including work that is simultaneous. You had a pretty classic beginning... around 10 you were a storyteller... you were writing and performing plays, but not a lot of formal training early on was there, and then just this tremendously full career in all forms – stage, television and film. What was the energy that drove the output do you think?
From a very young age like you said I was writing and performing things. The desire to perform has always been there for me. I don’t remember thinking, ‘I would like to do that’, because I was always doing it.
And now, it must have been in the last couple of years, I’ve really regretted that I haven’t done any formal training. So I’ve gone back to training and I’ve signed up for every single masterclass and acting workshop that I am available for. I feel like I can never stop learning.
Even though I might be working on critically successful shows and win awards and everything, I still don’t feel like I have learned as much as I can. I don’t think you ever stop learning and I still feel like such a novice and I guess that is what keeps driving me as well. The investigation of human psychology is endlessly fascinating for me.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: TV, film, theatre, Danielle Cormack
Duration: 32'33"

10:40
Book Review - The Fire Child by S K Treymayne
BODY:
The Fire Child by S K Treymayne. Reviewed by Lisa Finucane and published by HarperCollins.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'23"

11:05
New Technology with Sarah Putt
BODY:
Sarah Putt discusses the Vodafone and Sky TV merger, debate on why digital technology is STILL a vocational subject, and a contraceptive app.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Vodafone, Sky TV, digital technology, contraception, Facebook
Duration: 15'43"

11:25
Parenting: Five 'E's for body positivity
BODY:
Auckland writer Angela Barnett, founder of the body positivity website F**king Awesome Bulimics I Know, or FABIK, talks to Kathryn about raising children with positive body image.
EXTENDED BODY:
How do we raise girls and boys to feel good about their bodies when they’re bombarded daily with images of photoshopped models and celebrities?
Writer Angela Barnett founded the body positivity website F**king Awesome Bulimics I Know, or FABIK.
She shares with Kathryn Ryan five 'E's for parents to keep in mind – Enjoy, Eat, Educate, Embrace and Empathise.
Related audio: Angela Barnett on body image (Nine to Noon, 3 July 2014)
Edited interview highlights
E - Enjoy
Angela Barnett: One thing we can do is think about how we are as role models ourselves. It’s so important that we exist in our bodies and we’re happy in our bodies and we don’t ever say derogatory things about our bodies. It’s also really important to not talk about ‘Oh, I’m getting older…’ because we only get one body and one chance to enjoy it.
I’m not saying it’s easy to live like that, and we all have our moments. We all have our off days where we don’t feel great. But if possible think about when you’re around your children, how you behave with them. Be the mum that goes for the swim, if you can. Or if you don’t want to get in your swimming togs get in a wetsuit, which is quite good in New Zealand oceans.
If you talk about exercise, talk about why you do it – ‘cause it makes you feel good as opposed to change your body or lose weight.
E – Eat
Angela Barnett: Cynthia Bulik – I call her the godmother of eating disorders – was in New Zealand a couple of months ago and she was talking about dieting and how we thought dieting was something that went out with big hair in the ‘80s. There’s still a lot of dieting that goes on, but it has changed its name now. It’s paleo or it’s gluten-free or it’s sugar-free. Everyone has a right to their own eating regime, but it’s so important around children to not talk about a diet in terms of ‘I’m eating this food to try and change my body’.
Cynthia Bulik was talking about a classroom of 11 year old kids who were all put on a diet for a week. At the end of the week 70% of them will go back to eating normally, for 25% something in the depriving of food will trigger a binge, so they’ll eat more, then a very small percentage will get sort of a high off the starvation and the deprivation. The starvation high [creates] a risk of anorexia and [the binge-triggering creates] a risk of bulimia or binge eating.
E – Educate
Angela Barnett: This is something I encourage parents to do at home. Thank goodness for the internet now, it’s so easy if you want to get into this subject. Say in a magazine, you flick to an ad that’s got your average typical beautiful model staring vacuously out selling whatever it is, a skin lotion… Start a conversation about it and try and get [your child] to move away from the focus on appearance. Say ‘What do you think her favourite movie is?’ What do you think she wants to be when she grows up? What’s her favourite sport?’
Try and get them to think critically about the messages thrown at them. There’s so many YouTube examples that explain how advertising is made. You can show them how an ad is photoshopped. It’s helping educate them that the world that they see is often a fantasy world, it’s a glamour world, and it’s not based in reality. Lots of studies show that if you teach teens how to be critical of what they’re looking at they’re a little bit less affected by it.
E - Embrace
Angela Barnett: If I do talks with teens I show them what Lorde did a couple of years ago when she was in Chile. There was a photo that came out that had her looking flawless with makeup. She tweeted the photoshopped photo and the real photo that showed the side of her face, the skin was bumpy, with the line "flaws are ok". Show them role models like that.
If your child wants to have an Instagram account – if they’re of an age where you’ve deemed that’s okay – look at Instagram accounts that are full of really creative photography. Encourage them – if they want to document their life and put it online – to find a really expressive way to be creative with it. Don’t just take photos of yourself, but take beautiful photos of things that you see and encourage the creativity. Show them great things to aspire to in that world.
E – Empathy
Angela Barnett: Remember it’s really hard as a teenager. There’s a lot going on and there is a lot of focus on appearance – there is. Everyone is talking about how everybody else looks. A lot of anxiety around then is ‘Am I okay? Will I be accepted? Do I look okay? What is okay?’ The other thing I think everyone worries about is ‘Will I be loved?’
One thing you can help do is explain that love is not about being the hottest person in the room. That might get you attention, but it won’t necessarily get you love. Tell stories of how you fell in love. Obviously there’s chemistry, but there’s other reasons why we fall in love with people.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'10"

11:45
Viewing with Paul Casserly
BODY:
TV and Film writer Paul Casserly reviews musical-comedy-drama Sing Street and the remake of the 70s miniseries Roots.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags: Sing Street, roots, Paul Casserly
Duration: 13'24"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:73723:third] no metadata
09:05 Clare Short on Blair: "He mislead people, there's no question"
"A bit of a lunatic asylum" - that's how Clare Short described the mood of the UK cabinet in the lead up to the Iraq War. Ms Short was the international development secretary in the UK government from 1997-2003 and quit shortly after the invasion. Nine to Noon gets her analysis of the Chilcot Report and what will happen next.
09:20 Health Star Ratings, 'not perfect but the best we've got'
[image:73665:third] no metadata
Winsome Parnell is a dietician and a member of the advisory committee to MPI on Health Star ratings. She says despite some anomalies the five scale front-of-pack labels are helping consumers make healthier choices while encouraging the industry to produce foods that are lower in saturated fat, sugar or salt.
09.30 The state of Te Reo
Currently in New Zealand there are about 48 thousand people fluent in Te Reo and the figure is falling steadily. Rawinia Higgins is at the forefront of efforts to preserve Te Reo as a living language. She's just taken up the role of deputy vice chancellor for Maori studies at Victoria University and had previously chaired a review of the government's Maori language bill.
09:45 UK correspondent Jon Dennis
Jon Dennis on the Chilcot report about Britain's involvement in the Iraq war and the latest action in UK politics post the Brexit referendum
10:05 Danielle Cormack on finding success in Australia
[image:73737:full]
New Zealand actress Danielle Cormack has forged a hugely successful career on screen and stage, largely in Australia in recent years. She's about to return to TV here in season 4 of the acclaimed Australian prison drama Wentworth, where she plays Bea Smith the prison's top dog. She's also been in Rake, Underbelly: Razor, as well as numerous films, and continues to perform on stage for the Melbourne Theatre Company and Sydney Theatre Company, among others. Last year she won a Logie award for most outstanding actress and most outstanding performance by a female actress at the ASTRA awards.
10:35 Book review - The Fire Child by S K Treymayne
reviewed by Lisa Finucane, published by HarperCollins
10:45 The Reading
My Father's Ears, by Karen Goa read by Michele Amas (Part 9 of 10)
11:05 New technology with Sarah Putt
Sarah Putt discusses the Vodafone and Sky TV merger, the debate around digital technology still being a vocational rather than an academic topic, and a contraceptive app.
11:25 Raising girls & boys to feel good about their bodies
Auckland writer Angela Barnett, founder of the website F**king Awesome Bulimics I Know, or FABIK, talks to Kathryn about raising children with positive body image. Angela writes for a range of New Zealand publications and also blogs here.
11:45 Viewing with Paul Casserly
Paul Casserly on the new musical Sing Street set in 1980s Dublin and the new version of Roots

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
Labour claims New Zealand's vindicated for staying out of Iraq. A multi-million dollar Wellington crackdown on P.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'14"

12:17
Nuplex special meeting on takeover
BODY:
The takeover of Nuplex by the Belgian chemical manufacturer, Allnex New Zealand, looks set to go ahead after the company recieved enough proxy votes in favour of the deal.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Nuplex
Duration: 2'50"

12:20
Economy shows some pep down the track
BODY:
The economy has solid momentum, which it is expected to maintain, if truck movements are to be believed.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Truckometer index
Duration: 1'37"

12:23
Midday markets for 7 July 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie at Craigs Investment Partners
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'10"

12:26
Business briefs
BODY:
New Zealand King Salmon says it's reviewing capital options to support its future growth and the development of its three new farms in the Marlborough Sounds consented in 2014.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
Cristiano Ronaldo scored one goal and inadvertently set up the other as Portugal claimed a 2-0 win over Wales to advance to the final of the European football champs.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'54"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 7 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:16
Redciffs school to remain open
BODY:
Education Minister, Hekia Parata, has announced the fate of Christchurch's Redcliffs School this morning. It will stay open. The school has been operating out of a temporary location, since aftershocks caused rockfall from the cliff behind the school, in 2011. The government announced it was planning on closing the school down but since then, the school commissioned a new geotechnical report on the site, in an attempt to get the government to reconsider. We spoke to Principal, Rose McInerney, just after she got the good news from the Minister.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'10"

13:20
Shoebox Christmas
BODY:
When Wellington man, Pera Barrett was 21 he woke up in hospital with serious injuries and head trauma. He was told he had been in a serious car crash.
EXTENDED BODY:
When Wellington man, Pera Barrett was 21 he woke up in hospital with serious injuries and head trauma. He was told he had been in a serious car crash. Even worse, it was his fault, and he had killed a woman when his car crossed the centre line on State Highway One.
The guilt and trauma has remained with him for many years since - but he says it has also taught him many lessons about life, and the importance of giving back to those in need. Two years ago he set up the Wellington Shoebox Christmas project, which involves giving Christmas gifts to children in need in the region.
Pera Barrett talks to Jesse Mulligan about the project and what lead to it.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Wellington Shoebox Christmas
Duration: 10'53"

13:31
Hotel Coolgardie - backpacker hell
BODY:
On a dusty outback highway near Australia's largest gold pit, sits the Hotel Coolgardie. Every three months a new pair of foreign female backpackers arrives to work there. Each arrival is a big deal for the locals in this isolated community.
EXTENDED BODY:
On a dusty outback highway near Australia's largest gold pit sits the Hotel Coolgardie. Every three months a new pair of foreign female backpackers arrive to work there. Each arrival is a big deal for the locals in this isolated community.
In the documentary Hotel Coolgardie filmmaker Peter Gleeson follows the story of two Finnish backpackers sent to work at the pub. The women are harangued by their new boss, relentlessly pursued and verbally abused by the pub's drunk and hard-as-nails patrons - and resulting the film is funny, shocking and very disturbing.
Hotel Coolgardie is screening in the New Zealand International Film Festival.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Hotel Coolgardie
Duration: 9'54"

13:41
Favourite album
BODY:
'Moondance' by Van Morrison, chosen by Ruth Kerr.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'40"

14:09
Theatre Critic - John Smyth
BODY:
John reviews 'La Casa Azul' and 'Stage Kiss'.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre
Duration: 9'50"

14:20
Money with Mary Holm
BODY:
Mary Holm has tips for first home buyers , including how to time the market and the two ways Kiwisaver can help you with the purchase.
Topics: money, housing
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'35"

15:07
Masterpieces with Peter Dowling
BODY:
Editor and publisher Peter Dowling is our guest on masterpieces this week and is here to talk about his favourite maori place names.
EXTENDED BODY:
Editor and publisher Peter Dowling is our guest on masterpieces this week and is here to talk about his favourite maori place names.
Peter Dowling's publishing company is re-releasing what he considers among the most enduring book ever published in this country, A.W. Reed's Dictionary of Māori Place Names.
It was first published in 1950 and had remained in print over several editions, but has not been available for a number of years... until this week
Peter Dowling used to work for Reed Publishing and now runs Oratia Media, which is releasing the new edition - which includes some important place name updates as well re-including some of the original drawings.
Topics: books, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: place names
Duration: 14'01"

15:22
The Expats: Caitlin Smith on living in Northern Iraq
BODY:
Caitlin Smith lives in the city of Sulimaniya which is near the Iranian border
EXTENDED BODY:
Caitlin Smith lives in the city of Sulimaniya which is near the Iranian border.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Iraq
Duration: 8'48"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 7 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'26"

21:06
Wairau Bar: How it all began
BODY:
Veronika Meduna joins Rangitane iwi members and scientists at Wairau Bar, New Zealand's most significant archaeological site, to find out about the place and its people, who were among the first to step ashore in Aotearoa.
EXTENDED BODY:
Wairau Bar is arguably New Zealand’s most important archaeological site, recognised as one of the earliest places of settlement. But it is also an inspiring example of collaboration between iwi and scientists, who together are revealing a story of beginnings.
Wairau Bar is a gravel spit at the mouth of the Wairau River, in Marlborough’s Cloudy Bay. It’s a forlorn place, windswept and barren, but some 700 years ago, it would have been bustling with people.
“It’s a village site and a village is where a community lives,” says Richard Walter, an archaeologist at the University of Otago who has spent the last few summers digging up traces of village life at Wairau Bar.
He thinks at least 200 people may have settled there not long after the first navigators set foot on land, and it became the most important village, a central place.
Over several seasons, the archaeological team has unearthed dwellings, cooking and food preparation areas, communal sites and a place where a scattering of stone chips provides evidence that tools were made there.
Several middens contain bones from “virtually every animal that has ever been eaten in New Zealand”, including moa and pilot whales.
With the help of geomagnetic techniques, the team also identified several structures, which turned out to be large stone-lined hangi pits, measuring five to six metres across.
"Various types of analyses make a strong argument that the food remains are from a single event, and not an accumulation over time. So simply the size of these features and the scale of the food remains leads us to think that these were communal activities, and whenever there are large-scale communal activities involving food preparation in Polynesian communities, you usually have some sort of ceremonial activity.”
He says these hangi pits could have been used for tangi, chiefly succession ceremonies, marriages or seasonal rituals that we don’t have any record of. “These are Polynesians, they’ve come from tropical Polynesia, and we can’t assume that the ceremonies and practices of modern times are the same that they would have had in the 1300s.”
Painful history
Back in 1939, a 13-year-old school boy named Jim Eyles made the first discoveries at Wairau Bar. He found moa eggs, necklaces, a sperm whale tooth and human remains. During the next 20 years, pioneering archaeologist Roger Duff and Canterbury Museum-led expeditions unearthed 44 skeletons and hundreds of artefacts – and tension built up between the local iwi Rangitane o Wairau and the archaeologists.
It wasn’t until 2009 that the tangata whenua were able to return their tipuna to their final resting place, but before the koiwi tangata were repatriated, iwi agreed that scientists could study the bones and take samples for genetic analysis. Archaeologists were also able to return to the site to excavate and to investigate the details of the village, in collaboration with Rangitane members.
Bones and genes
University of Otago anthropologist Hallie Buckley has spent months inspecting the bones of the people who were buried at Wairau Bar, including a woman who is now known as Aunty.
“When Aunty died, she was probably no older than 30, but she was a strong women, she had fine features and was gracile.”
Her teeth tell of childhood stresses, possibly periods of food shortages or infections, during which the enamel stopped developing. They also hold clues of a diet that suggests that Aunty had grown up elsewhere. “She wasn’t born here. Her teeth had taken on a geological signature that’s very different from here so it’s likely that she was among the first group of people that came and settled in this area.”
The bones also tell of physically hard work and disease, including gout and possibly even tuberculosis.
Aunty is also one of the people whose mitochondrial genome has been sequenced by a team led by fellow Otago anthropologist Lisa Matisoo-Smith. The genetic diversity found among the Wairau Bar tipuna suggests that this founding population must have been much larger than previously thought, and that the first group to arrive in Aotearoa probably included hundreds of women.
Topics: te ao Maori, science, environment, history
Regions: Marlborough
Tags: Wairau Bar, archaeology, settlement of New Zealand, burials, koiwi tangata, mitochondrial genome, Polynesian migration
Duration: 26'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Redciffs school to remain open
Education Minister, Hekia Parata, has announced the fate of Christchurch's Redcliffs School this morning. It will stay open. The school has been operating out of a temporary location, since aftershocks caused rockfall from the cliff behind the school, in 2011. The government announced it was planning on closing the school down but since then
The school commissioned a new geotechnical report on the site, in an attempt to get the government to reconsider
We spoke to Principal, Rose McInerney, just after she got the good news from the Minister.
1:20 Shoebox Christmas
When Wellington man, Pera Barrett was 21 he woke up in hospital with serious injuries and head trauma. He was told he had been in a serious car crash. Even worse, it was his fault, and he had killed a woman when his car crossed the centre line on State Highway One.
The guilt and trauma has remained with him for many years since - but he says it has also taught him many lessons about life, and the importance of giving back to those in need. Two years ago he set up the Wellington Shoebox Christmas project, which involves giving Christmas gifts to children in need in the region.
[gallery:2233]
1:30 Hotel Coolgardie - backpacker hell
A documentary about a pub in a small remote Western Australian town is ruffling feathers. Hotel Coolgardie is a feature length documentary film, showing here as part of the New Zealand International film festival. It follows two young female Finnish backpackers who are sent to work at the Coolgardie pub.
The film highlights the ugliest side of the nation's drinking culture, and shows the nightmare the girls lived through during their brief stay there.
Pete Gleeson shot and directed the film which makes for some tough viewing in its final 90 minute version.
[embed] https://vimeo.com/164355144
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Theatre Critic
2:20 Money with Mary Holm
3:10 Masterpieces with Peter Dowling
Editor and publisher Peter Dowling is our guest on masterpieces this week and is here to talk about his favourite maori place names.
Peter Dowling's publishing company is re-releasing what he considers among the most enduring book ever published in this country, A.W. Reed's Dictionary of Māori Place Names.
It was first published in 1950 and had remained in print over several editions, but has not been available for a number of years... until this week

Peter Dowling used to work for Reed Publishing and now runs Oratia Media, which is releasing the new edition - which includes some important place name updates as well re-including some of the original drawings.
[gallery:2226]
3:25 The Expats: Caitlin Smith on living in Northern Iraq
Caitlin Smith lives in the city of Sulimaniya which is near the Iranian border
[gallery:2230]
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 7 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'26"

16:03
The Panel with Nicky Pellegrino and Patrick Morgan (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Nicky Pellegrino and Patrick Morgan have been up to. .Al Gillespie discusses the Chilcott report into the British invasion of Iraq in 2003. The Green Party wants gay men who were criminalised prior to 1986 to receive an offical apology. The paralympian has been sentenced to six years in prison for murdering Reeva Steenkamp. The wife of former Auckland mayor John Banks has received an apology from the Judge in the criminal case against her husband. Is it usual for a judge to apologise? A listener says in New Zealand there's a lot of talk and not enough action.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'07"

16:05
The Panel with Nicky Pellegrino and Patrick Morgan (Part 2)
BODY:
People who expect their relationships to be happy are more committed and are kinder to their partner. What the Panelists Nicky Pellegrino and Patrick Morgan have been thinking about. Acting chief economist of Westpac Michael Gordon talks about what's anticpated in this afternoon's Reserve Bank announcement. What should Police be cracking down on on our roads? Should we have more $1m-plus Lotto prizes rather than one giant jackpot? Some are calling for an end of the use of the term ex-pat saying it's mainly used to describe white, Western immigrants.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'35"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Nicky Pellegrino and Patrick Morgan have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'13"

16:11
Chilcott report
BODY:
Al Gillespie discusses the Chilcott report into the British invasion of Iraq in 2003.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Iraq
Duration: 10'20"

16:21
Apology for gay men
BODY:
The Green Party wants gay men who were criminalised prior to 1986 to receive an offical apology.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'12"

16:22
Oscar Pistorious
BODY:
The paralympian has been sentenced to six years in prison for murdering Reeva Steenkamp.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Oscar Pistorious
Duration: 1'40"

16:24
Judge apologies to Amanda Banks
BODY:
The wife of former Auckland mayor John Banks has received an apology from the Judge in the criminal case against her husband. Is it usual for a judge to apologise?
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: John Banks, apology
Duration: 5'00"

16:29
Is NZ all talk no action?
BODY:
A listener says in New Zealand there's a lot of talk and not enough action.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: talk
Duration: 1'09"

16:33
Optimism makes for a happy relationship
BODY:
People who expect their relationships to be happy are more committed and are kinder to their partner.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'30"

16:35
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Nicky Pellegrino and Patrick Morgan have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'43"

16:41
Cooling the housing market
BODY:
Acting chief economist of Westpac Michael Gordon talks about what's anticpated in this afternoon's Reserve Bank announcement.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'53"

16:48
Police targetting dangerous drivers
BODY:
What should Police be cracking down on on our roads?
Topics: crime, transport
Regions:
Tags: police
Duration: 6'22"

16:54
Another Lotto jackpot
BODY:
Should we have more $1m-plus Lotto prizes rather than one giant jackpot?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Lotto
Duration: 2'08"

16:56
Are you offended by the word ex-pat?
BODY:
Some are calling for an end of the use of the term ex-pat saying it's mainly used to describe white, Western immigrants.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: ex-pats
Duration: 2'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Thursday 7th July 2016
BODY:
Watch Thursday's full programme here. It begins 5 minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:09
Did Corrections know Ngapari Nui was a gang member?
BODY:
Lifelong Black Power member Ngapari Nui says Corrections was aware of his gang associations and Head of Corrections Ray Smith personally signed off his Kaiwhakamana volunteer card.
Topics: te ao Maori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Ngapari Nui, Corrections, gangs
Duration: 9'05"

17:18
John Key quizzed on Collins' involvement with Nui
BODY:
Asked today whether it was appropriate for Corrections Minister Judith Collins to get involved in operational issues, Prime Minister John Key said he could not comment.
Topics: te ao Maori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Ngapari Nui, Corrections, gangs
Duration: 58"

17:24
Chilcot report seen as justifying NZ govt stance in 2003
BODY:
New Zealand pundits and politicians have interpreted the Chilcot inquiry's report as vindication of Helen Clark's Labour government choosing not to send combat troops to Iraq.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Iraq
Duration: 2'51"

17:27
Redcliffs community relieved school will stay in suburb
BODY:
The principal of a Christchurch school facing closure - Redcliffs - says the community is relieved the Minister of Education has had a change of heart.
Topics: politics, education
Regions:
Tags: Redcliffs school
Duration: 3'14"

17:32
Evening Business for 7 July 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'52"

17:36
Labour pledges $15m a year for 1400 emergency housing places
BODY:
The Labour Party has marked its centenary today by pledging to pump $15m a year into doubling the number of emergency housing places, if it's elected.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Labour Party
Duration: 3'02"

17:40
Breakdown of top 10 biggest debts to Work and Income.
BODY:
Checkpoint asked the Ministry of Social Development for the 10 biggest individual debts to WINZ - broken down by type of debt.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: WINZ
Duration: 1'01"

17:41
Judge apologises to former Act leader's wife
BODY:
A High Court judge has publicly apologised to former Act leader John Banks's wife after questioning her crediblity as a witness.
Topics: politics, law
Regions:
Tags: John Banks
Duration: 3'40"

17:44
RBNZ may tighten LTR ratios further
BODY:
The RBNZ is considering tightening Loan-to-Value Ratios further to counter the growing influence of investor demand in Akld and other regions.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 4'34"

17:50
MP and ratepayers object to Council government minder
BODY:
The leaders of the Mangawhai rates rebellion - and the Northland MP Winston Peters - are condemning the appointment of a Government minder for the Kaipara District Council.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
Tags: Mangawhai
Duration: 3'27"

17:55
Eugene councillor explains why Uber isn't welcome
BODY:
Alternative taxi service Uber has come under fire from the Transport Agency who says many of its drivers are driving illegally.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Uber, US
Duration: 4'06"

18:09
Patched Black Power prison volunteer stood down
BODY:
Did the Corrections Department know that Ngapari Nui was a gang member when it allowed him to volunteer in prisons?
Topics: politics, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Corrections, Ngapari Nui, gangs
Duration: 4'12"

18:13
Will RBNZ restrictions help solve Akld's housing crisis?
BODY:
Bernard Hickey, Leroy Beckett & Andrew King talk to John Campbell about the RBNZ Deputy Governor's speech.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 12'50"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 7 July 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Parliamentary messengers farewelled; Health Minister Jonathan Coleman rebuked for comments about his Labour shadow Annette King; Opposition continues to question Government claims that its housing programme is comprehensive; Foreign Affairs Committee briefed on Space treaty with the USA; Commerce Committee briefed by Auditor-General's office on its report on the roll-out of broadband.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'11"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Political Commentators Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Moneyshots - Rob Suisted
BODY:
Most of us have an example of nature photographer Rob Suisted's work in our wallets - his images feature on New Zealand banknotes and stamps. He has a blog at naturespic.com
EXTENDED BODY:
There's a very good chance you're familiar with Rob Suisted's work – his nature photos appear on current New Zealand banknotes and stamps.
"The [banknote photo] I'm proudly most proud of is the one of Mt Aoraki, Mt Cook, next to Sir Ed [Hillary]. He's been a mentor of mine, so that's pretty cool. Campbell Island, the lagoon on the $50 note, the Kaikoura mountains on the $20... even down to the blue magic mushrooms on the $50 note, which people like commenting about" - Rob Suisted
Rob's blog is naturespic.
Topics: arts, environment
Regions:
Tags: photography, outdoors, nature
Duration: 22'53"

20:12
Nights' Culture - Hip Hop
BODY:
Can you spot a whip from a nae-nae? University of Auckland ethnomusicologist Dr Kirsten Zemke looks at recent dance crazes.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: hip hop, dance
Duration: 25'54"

=SHOW NOTES=

[gallery:2235]
7:12 Moneyshots - Rob Suisted
Most of us have an example of nature photographer Rob Suisted's work in our wallets - his images feature on New Zealand banknotes and stamps. He also has a blog: naturespic.

7:35 At the Movies
Simon Morris talks to American director Whit Stillman (The last days of disco) about his take on a never-filmed Jane Austen novella, Love and Friendship. He also looks at another golden oldie - the new film The Legend of Tarzan, and a small, feelgood movie, Dough.

8:12 Nights' Culture - Hip Hop
Can you spot a whip from a nae-nae? University of Auckland ethnomusicologist Dr Kirsten Zemke looks at recent dance crazes.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjW8wmF5VWc
8:30 Window on the World
The Accrington Pals - The story of the Accrington Pals, a battalion of East Lancashire volunteers who joined the so-called 'Big Push' against the German front line at the Battle of the Somme. On July the first they marched into a hail of German machine gun fire. An allied artillery bombardment was meant to have destroyed all resistance. But the Germans were well armed and well dug-in. In less than 30 minutes more than 580 of the 720 Accrington Pals were killed, injured or missing in action. Lyse Doucet explores the pride and sadness of local people as they prepare to mark the centenary of the day that nearly wiped out the Accrington Pals and she reflects on modern attitudes to war and remembrance.

9:07 Our Changing World
Early Maori settlement at Wairau Bar, the threats facing New Zealand sea lions, and Taniwha - a human-powered submarine
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 Music 101 pocket edition
In the Music 101 Pocket Edition tonight…Rob Ruha gives an insight into this latest track Kariri, Nick D of Weird Together presents a primer on Pakistani and Indian electronic music. And new tunes from GL, BV, Angel Olsen, Miss June and Deerhoof.

===7:30 PM. | At The Movies===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly topical magazine about current film releases and film related topics

=AUDIO=

19:31
The Legend of Tarzan
BODY:
100 years old and still going strong, this version comes from the producer and director of the Harry Potter films.
Topics: arts, movies
Regions:
Tags: The Legend of Tarzan, film
Duration: 5'36"

19:32
Dough
BODY:
An odd-couple comedy-drama, starring Jonathan Price (Game of Thrones) as a Jewish Baker forced to employ a young, African, Muslim kid.
Topics: movies, arts
Regions:
Tags: Dough, film
Duration: 3'53"

19:33
Love and Friendship
BODY:
An extended interview with director Whit Stillman, about his adaptation of an unpublished - and very sexy! - novel by Jane Austen.
Topics: movies, arts
Regions:
Tags: film, Love and Friendship, Jane Austen
Duration: 14'05"

=SHOW NOTES=

Featured this week – The Legend of Tarzan, 100 years old and still going strong.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dL1srqGvMVI
Dough is another food-movie, where an old Jewish baker hires a young Muslim boy as his unlikely apprentice.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7b4IoNRhtk
And American film-maker Whit Stillman talks about Love and Friendship, a hitherto unfilmed story by Jane Austen.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpGzmvUVBGI

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | Our Changing World===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlights from the world of science and the environment, with Alison Ballance and Veronika Meduna

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===

Late Edition for 7 July 2016
Britain's mistaken war - according to an official inquiry. The government spares a Christchurch school and in Dateline Pacific, Norfolk Island continues its push for the return to self government.

=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on New Zealand/Aotearoa (RNZ)